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AEG
Allgemeine Elektricitäts-Gesellschaft AG[1] (AEG) (German: "General electricity company") was a German producer of electrical equipment founded as the Deutsche Edison-Gesellschaft für angewandte Elektricität in 1883 in Berlin
Berlin
by Emil Rathenau. After World War II its headquarters moved to Frankfurt
Frankfurt
am Main. In 1967 AEG
AEG
joined with its subsidiary Telefunken
Telefunken
AG creating Allgemeine Elektricitäts-Gesellschaft AEG-Telefunken. In 1985 Daimler-Benz
Daimler-Benz
purchased the AEG- Telefunken
Telefunken
Aktiengesellschaft, which was renamed to AEG
AEG
Aktiengesellschaft
Aktiengesellschaft
and wholly integrated the company in 1996 into Daimler-Benz
Daimler-Benz
AG (1998:DaimlerChrysler)
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Berlin Nordbahnhof
Berlin
Berlin
Nordbahnhof (formerly Stettiner Bahnhof) is a railway station in the Mitte
Mitte
district of Berlin, Germany
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EADS
Civilian A300, A310, A318, A319, A320, A321, A330, A340, A350, A380Revenue €66.767 billion[3] (FY 2017)Operating income €4.253 billion[3] (FY 2017)Net income €2.873 billion[3] (FY 2017)Total assets €111.13 billion[4] (FY 2016)Total equity €3.65 billion[4] (FY 2016)OwnerAs of September 2016:[5] France
France
– 11.1% Germany
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Artificial Waterfall
An artificial waterfall is a water feature or fountain which imitates a natural waterfall.[1] Artificial waterfalls have long been featured in traditional Japanese gardens, where they can serve to highlight a scene or to provide focus. The classic gardening manual Sakuteiki, written in the mid-to-late 11th century, lists nine different types.[2][3] The Cascata delle Marmore
Cascata delle Marmore
is an example of a man-made waterfall created by the ancient Romans. Artificial waterfalls were popular in Europe in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including the famous waterfall in Viktoriapark in Berlin.[1] An early American example is Huntington Waterfalls in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, California
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Frankfurt
Frankfurt, officially Frankfurt
Frankfurt
am Main (German: [ˈfʁaŋkfʊɐ̯ t am ˈmaɪn] ( listen); lit. ' Frankfurt
Frankfurt
on the Main'), is a metropolis and the largest city in the German state of Hesse
Hesse
and the fifth-largest city in Germany. Frankfurt
Frankfurt
was a city state, the Free City of Frankfurt, for nearly five centuries, and was one of the most important cities of the Holy Roman Empire; it lost its sovereignty in 1866. In 2015, Frankfurt
Frankfurt
has a population of 732,688 within its administrative boundaries,[4] and 2.3 million in its urban area.[2][5] The city is at the centre of the larger Frankfurt Rhine-Main Metropolitan Region, which has a population of 5.5 million[1] and is Germany's second-largest metropolitan region after Rhine-Ruhr
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Lauffen Am Neckar
 Lauffen am Neckar (help·info) (Lauffen) is a town in the district of Heilbronn, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It is situated on the river Neckar, 9 kilometres (6 miles) southwest of Heilbronn
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Electric Motor
An electric motor is an electrical machine that converts electrical energy into mechanical energy. The reverse of this is the conversion of mechanical energy into electrical energy and is done by an electric generator, which has much in common with a motor. Most electric motors operate through the interaction between an electric motor's magnetic field and winding currents to generate force. In certain applications, such as in regenerative braking with traction motors in the transportation industry, electric motors can also be used in reverse as generators to convert mechanical energy into electric power. Found in applications as diverse as industrial fans, blowers and pumps, machine tools, household appliances, power tools, and disk drives, electric motors can be powered by direct current (DC) sources, such as from batteries, motor vehicles or rectifiers, or by alternating current (AC) sources, such as from the power grid, inverters or generators
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Berlin-Gesundbrunnen
Gesundbrunnen (colloquially Plumpe, i.e. pump) is a locality (Ortsteil) of Berlin
Berlin
in the borough (Bezirk) of Mitte. It was created as a separate entity by the 2001 administrative reform, formerly the eastern half of the former Wedding district (merged into Mitte) and locality. Gesundbrunnen has the highest percentage of non-German residents of any Berlin
Berlin
locality, at 35.1% as of the end of 2008.[1]Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Transportation 4 Famous people 5 Photo gallery 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit] The locality is situated in Berlin's inner city, at the north-eastern rim of the central Mitte
Mitte
borough. Bernauer Straße
Bernauer Straße
separates it from the locality of Mitte
Mitte
in the south and Reinickendorfer Straße from Wedding in the west
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Incandescent Light Bulb
An incandescent light bulb, incandescent lamp or incandescent light globe is an electric light with a wire filament heated to such a high temperature that it glows with visible light (incandescence). The filament is protected from oxidation with a glass or fused quartz bulb that is filled with inert gas or a vacuum. In a halogen lamp, filament evaporation is slowed by a chemical process that redeposits metal vapor onto the filament, thereby extending its life. The light bulb is supplied with electric current by feed-through terminals or wires embedded in the glass. Most bulbs are used in a socket which provides mechanical support and electrical connections. Incandescent
Incandescent
bulbs are manufactured in a wide range of sizes, light output, and voltage ratings, from 1.5 volts to about 300 volts. They require no external regulating equipment, have low manufacturing costs, and work equally well on either alternating current or direct current
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Switch
In electrical engineering, a switch is an electrical component that can "make" or "break" an electrical circuit, interrupting the current or diverting it from one conductor to another.[1][2] The mechanism of a switch removes or restores the conducting path in a circuit when it is operated. It may be operated manually, for example, a light switch or a keyboard button, may be operated by a moving object such as a door, or may be operated by some sensing element for pressure, temperature or flow. A switch will have one or more sets of contacts, which may operate simultaneously, sequentially, or alternately. Switches in high-powered circuits must operate rapidly to prevent destructive arcing, and may include special features to assist in rapidly interrupting a heavy current. Multiple forms of actuators are used for operation by hand or to sense position, level, temperature or flow
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Fuse (electrical)
In electronics and electrical engineering, a fuse is an electrical safety device that operates to provide overcurrent protection of an electrical circuit. Its essential component is a metal wire or strip that melts when too much current flows through it, thereby interrupting the current. It is a sacrificial device; once a fuse has operated it is an open circuit, and it must be replaced or rewired, depending on type. Fuses have been used as essential safety devices from the early days of electrical engineering. Today there are thousands of different fuse designs which have specific current and voltage ratings, breaking capacity and response times, depending on the application. The time and current operating characteristics of fuses are chosen to provide adequate protection without needless interruption
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Thomas Edison
Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor.[1][2][3] He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park",[4] he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.[5] Edison was a prolific inventor, holding 1,093 US patents in his name, as well as many patents in the United Kingdom, France, and Germany. More significant than the number of Edison's patents was the widespread impact of his inventions: electric light and power utilities, sound recording, and motion pictures all established major new industries worldwide
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Resistor
A resistor is a passive two-terminal electrical component that implements electrical resistance as a circuit element. In electronic circuits, resistors are used to reduce current flow, adjust signal levels, to divide voltages, bias active elements, and terminate transmission lines, among other uses. High-power resistors that can dissipate many watts of electrical power as heat, may be used as part of motor controls, in power distribution systems, or as test loads for generators. Fixed resistors have resistances that only change slightly with temperature, time or operating voltage. Variable resistors can be used to adjust circuit elements (such as a volume control or a lamp dimmer), or as sensing devices for heat, light, humidity, force, or chemical activity. Resistors are common elements of electrical networks and electronic circuits and are ubiquitous in electronic equipment. Practical resistors as discrete components can be composed of various compounds and forms
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Corporate Identity
A corporate identity or corporate image is the manner which a corporation, firm or business presents themselves to the public (such as customers and investors as well as employees). Corporate identity
Corporate identity
is a primary goal of the corporate communications, for the purpose to maintain and build the identity to accord with and facilitate the corporate business objectives. The corporate identity is typically visualized by way of branding and the use of trademarks, [1]but it can also include things like product design, advertising, public relations etc.. . In general, this amounts to a corporate title, logo (logotype and/or logogram) and supporting devices commonly assembled within a set of corporate guidelines
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Transformer
A transformer is a static electrical device that transfers electrical energy between two or more circuits through electromagnetic induction. A varying current in one coil of the transformer produces a varying magnetic field, which in turn induces a varying electromotive force (emf) or "voltage" in a second coil. Power can be transferred between the two coils through the magnetic field, without a metallic connection between the two circuits. Faraday's law of induction discovered in 1831 described this effect. Transformers
Transformers
are used to increase or decrease the alternating voltages in electric power applications. Since the invention of the first constant-potential transformer in 1885, transformers have become essential for the transmission, distribution, and utilization of alternating current electrical energy.[3] A wide range of transformer designs is encountered in electronic and electric power applications
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