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A.out
a.out is a file format used in older versions of Unix-like
Unix-like
computer operating systems for executables, object code, and, in later systems, shared libraries
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AT&T
AT&T Inc. is an American multinational conglomerate holding company headquartered at Whitacre Tower
Whitacre Tower
in Downtown Dallas, Texas.[8] AT&T is the world's largest telecommunications company. AT&T is also the second largest provider of mobile telephone services and the largest provider of fixed telephone services in the United States. AT&T Inc. began its history as Southwestern Bell
Southwestern Bell
Telephone Company, which was a subsidiary of the Bell Telephone
Telephone
Company founded by Alexander Graham Bell
Alexander Graham Bell
in 1880. Bell Telephone
Telephone
Company evolved into American Telephone
Telephone
and Telegraph Company in 1885 which had since rebranded to AT&T Corporation
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FreeBSD
FreeBSD
FreeBSD
is a free and open-source Unix-like
Unix-like
operating system descended from Research Unix
Research Unix
via the Berkeley Software Distribution
Berkeley Software Distribution
(BSD). Although for legal reasons FreeBSD
FreeBSD
cannot use the Unix
Unix
trademark, it is a direct descendant of BSD, which was historically also called "BSD Unix" or "Berkeley Unix"
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GOFF
Goff is a surname with several distinct origins. It is the 946th most common family name in the United States.[1] When the surname originates from England it is derived from an occupational name from German, Cornish and Breton. The German Goff means a godly person, a strong warrior, or a priest. The Breton goff means "smith" (cognate with Gaelic gobha). The English-originating surname is common in East Anglia, where it is of Breton origin. The Welsh name is a variant of the surname Gough, and is derived from a nickname for someone with red hair. The native Irish name is derived from a patronymic form of the Gaelic personal name Eochaidh/Eachaidh, which means "horseman".[2][3] Notable people[edit]Barbara Goff, classics professor Bruce Goff, architect Darius Goff
Darius Goff
(1809–1891), industrialist and businessman Frederick R. Goff
Frederick R

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SunOS
SunOS
SunOS
is a Unix-branded operating system developed by Sun Microsystems for their workstation and server computer systems. The SunOS
SunOS
name is usually only used to refer to versions 1.0 to 4.1.4, which were based on BSD, while versions 5.0 and later are based on UNIX System V Release 4, and are marketed under the brand name Solaris.Contents1 History 2 "SunOS" and "Solaris" 3 User interface 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] SunOS
SunOS
version Release date Codebase DescriptionSun UNIX 0.7 1982 UniSoft UNIX v7[1] Bundled with 68000-based Sun-1
Sun-1
system. No windowing system.SunOS 1.0[2] Nov 1983 4.1BSD Support for 68010-based Sun-1
Sun-1
and Sun-2
Sun-2
systems
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4.2BSD
Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) was a Unix operating system derivative developed and distributed by the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) of the University of California, Berkeley, from 1977 to 1995. Today, the term "BSD" is often used non-specifically to refer to any of the BSD descendants which form a branch of the family of Unix-like operating systems. Operating systems derived from the original Berkeley source code, such as FreeBSD and OpenBSD, remain actively developed and widely used. BSD was initially called Berkeley Unix because it shared the same source code with AT&T Research Unix
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BSD
Berkeley Software Distribution
Berkeley Software Distribution
(BSD) was a Unix
Unix
operating system derivative developed and distributed by the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) of the University of California, Berkeley, from 1977 to 1995. Today, the term "BSD" is often used non-specifically to refer to any of the BSD descendants which form a branch of the family of Unix-like
Unix-like
operating systems. Operating systems derived from the original Berkeley source code, such as FreeBSD
FreeBSD
and OpenBSD, remain actively developed and widely used. BSD was initially called Berkeley Unix
Unix
because it shared the same source code with AT&T Research Unix
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Version 7 Unix
Seventh Edition Unix, also called Version 7 Unix, Version 7 or just V7, was an important early release of the Unix
Unix
operating system. V7, released in 1979, was the last Bell Laboratories
Bell Laboratories
release to see widespread distribution before the commercialization of Unix
Unix
by AT&T Corporation in the early 1980s. V7 was originally developed for Digital Equipment Corporation's PDP-11
PDP-11
minicomputers and was later ported to other platforms.Contents1 Overview 2 Reception 3 Released as free software 4 New features in Version 74.1 Multiplexed files5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] Unix
Unix
versions from Bell Labs
Bell Labs
were designated by the edition of the user's manual with which they were accompanied
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Version 6 Unix
Sixth Edition Unix, also called Version 6 Unix
Unix
or just V6, was the first version of the Unix
Unix
operating system to see wide release outside Bell Labs. It was released in May 1975 and, like its direct predecessor, targeted the DEC PDP-11
PDP-11
family of minicomputers. It was superseded by Version 7 Unix
Unix
in 1978/1979, although V6 systems remained in regular operation until at least 1985.[1] AT&T Corporation licensed Version 5 Unix
Unix
to educational institutions only, but licensed Version 6 also to commercial users for $20,000, and it remained the most widely used version into the 1980s.[2] An enhanced V6 was the basis of the first ever commercially sold Unix
Unix
version, INTERACTIVE's IS/1. Bell's own PWB/UNIX 1.0 was also based on V6, where earlier (unreleased) versions were based on V4 and V5
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Association For Computing Machinery
The Association for Computing
Computing
Machinery (ACM) is an international learned society for computing. It was founded in 1947, and is the world's largest[1] scientific and educational computing society. It is a not-for-profit professional membership group.[2] Its membership is more than 100,000 as of 2011. Its headquarters are in New York City. The ACM is an umbrella organization for academic and scholarly interests in computer science
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SIGPLAN
SIGPLAN is the Association for Computing Machinery's Special
Special
Interest Group on programming languages.Contents1 Conferences 2 Associated journals 3 Newsletters 4 Awards4.1 Programming Languages Software Award 4.2 Programming Languages Achievement Award 4.3
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Bell Labs
Nokia
Nokia
Bell Labs
Bell Labs
(formerly named AT&T Bell Laboratories, Bell Telephone
Telephone
Laboratories and Bell Labs) is an American research and scientific development company, owned by Finnish company Nokia. Its headquarters are located in Murray Hill, New Jersey, in addition to other laboratories around the rest of the United States
United States
and in other countries. The historic laboratory originated in the late 19th century as the Volta Laboratory and Bureau
Volta Laboratory and Bureau
created by Alexander Graham Bell
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Debugger
A debugger or debugging tool is a computer program that is used to test and debug other programs (the "target" program). The code to be examined might alternatively be running on an instruction set simulator (ISS), a technique that allows great power in its ability to halt when specific conditions are encountered, but which will typically be somewhat slower than executing the code directly on the appropriate (or the same) processor. Some debuggers offer two modes of operation, full or partial simulation, to limit this impact. A "trap" occurs when the program cannot normally continue because of a programming bug or invalid data. For example, the program might have tried to use an instruction not available on the current version of the CPU or attempted to access unavailable or protected memory
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