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A.J. Chegwidden
Rear Admiral Albert Jethro "A.J." Chegwidden, JAGC, USN (Ret.), is a fictional character played by John M
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Non-judicial Punishment
Non-judicial punishment (or NJP) is any form of punishment that may be applied to individual military personnel, without a need for a court martial or similar proceedings.Contents1 United States1.1 Hearing 1.2 Punishments1.2.1 For officers accused of misconduct 1.2.2 For enlisted members accused of misconduct1.3 See also 1.4 References2 External linksUnited States[edit] In the United States Armed Forces, non-judicial punishment is a form of military justice authorized by Article 15 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice. NJP permits commanders to administratively discipline troops without a court-martial. Punishment can range from reprimand to reduction in rank, correctional custody, confinement on bread and water/diminished rations (aboard ships only), loss of pay, extra duty, and/or restrictions
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Maryland
Motto(s): Fatti maschii, parole femine (English: Strong Deeds, Gentle Words)[3] The Latin text encircling the seal: Scuto bonæ voluntatis tuæ coronasti nos (With favor Wilt Thou Compass Us as with a Shield) Psalm 5:12[4]State song(s): "Maryland, My Maryland"Official language None (English, de facto)Demonym MarylanderCapital AnnapolisLargest city BaltimoreLargest metro Baltimore- Washington Metro
Washington Metro
AreaArea Ranked 42nd • Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km2) • Width 196 miles (315 k
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Surface Warfare
Modern naval warfare is divided into four operational areas: surface warfare, air warfare, submarine warfare and information warfare. Each area comprises specialized platforms and strategies used to exploit tactical advantages unique and inherent to that area. Surface warfare involves surface ships. Description[edit] Modern surface warfare dates from the mid-20th century, when surface, air, and submarine warfare components were blended together as a tactical unit to achieve strategic objectives. In US Navy
US Navy
doctrine, the two most important strategic objectives are interdiction and sea control.Interdiction is the process of intercepting an enemy transiting through a location
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Destroyer
In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast, maneuverable long-endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet, convoy or battle group and defend them against smaller powerful short-range attackers
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Arleigh Burke Class Destroyer
The Arleigh Burke
Arleigh Burke
class of guided missile destroyers (DDGs) is the United States Navy's first class of destroyer built around the Aegis Combat System and the SPY-1D multifunction passive electronically scanned array radar. The class is named for Admiral
Admiral
Arleigh Burke, an American destroyer officer in World War II, and later Chief of Naval Operations. The class leader, USS Arleigh Burke, was commissioned during Admiral
Admiral
Burke's lifetime. These warships were designed as multimission destroyers[6] to fit the antiaircraft warfare (AAW) role with their powerful Aegis radar and surface-to-air missiles; antisubmarine warfare (ASW), with their towed sonar array, anti-submarine rockets, and ASW helicopter; antisurface warfare (ASuW) with their Harpoon missile launcher; and strategic land strike role with their Tomahawk missiles
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Law School
A law school (also known as a law centre or college of law) is an institution specializing in legal education, usually involved as part of a process for becoming a lawyer within a given jurisdiction.Contents1 Law degrees1.1 Australia 1.2 Brazil 1.3 Canada 1.4 England and English common law countries 1.5 Finland 1.6 France 1.7 Indonesia 1.8 India 1.9 Malaysia 1.10 Hong Kong1.10.1 Law Schools in Hong Kong1.11 Iran 1.12 Japan 1.13 Philippines 1.14 Singapore1.14.1 Law Schools in Singapore1.15 Serbia 1.16 South Korea 1.17 Sri Lanka 1.18 Taiwan 1.19 United States2 Postgraduate and professional study 3 Alternative legal education systems3.1 UK and Europe 3.2 Australia4 List of law schools 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingLaw degrees[edit] Australia[edit] To practice in Australia, one needs to graduate with a Bachelor of Laws (LLB),
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U.S. Pacific Fleet
The United States
United States
Pacific Fleet (USPACFLT) is a Pacific Ocean theater-level component command of the United States
United States
Navy that provides naval forces to the United States
United States
Pacific Command. Fleet headquarters is at Pearl Harbor
Pearl Harbor
Naval Station, Hawaii, with large secondary facilities at North Island, San Diego Bay
San Diego Bay
on the Mainland.Contents1 Origins 2 Composition of the Pacific Fleet in December 1941 3 Post 1945 4 Commanders 5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksOrigins[edit] A Pacific Fleet was created in 1907 when the Asiatic Squadron
Asiatic Squadron
and the Pacific Squadron
Pacific Squadron
were combined. In 1910, the ships of the First Squadron were organized back into a separate Asiatic Fleet
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Kevin Dunn
Kevin Dunn
Kevin Dunn
(born August 24, 1956) is an American actor who has appeared in supporting roles in a number of films and television series since the 1980s. His roles include White House
White House
Communications Director Alan Reed in the political comedy Dave, US Army Colonel Hicks in the 1998 version of Godzilla, Alan Abernathy's father Stuart in Small Soldiers, Sam Witwicky's father Ron in Transformers, Oscar Galvin in the 2010 action thriller Unstoppable, and Major Ken Quesada in HBO's True Detective. Currently he stars as pessimistic Presidential Chief of Staff Ben Cafferty in Veep.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Filmography 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Dunn was born in Chicago, the son of John Dunn, a musician and poet, and his wife Margaret (née East), a nurse.[2][3] His sister is actress/comedian Nora Dunn
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Pilot Episode
A television pilot (also known as a pilot or a pilot episode and sometimes marketed as a tele-movie) is a standalone episode of a television series that is used to sell the show to a television network. At the time of its creation, the pilot is meant to be the testing ground to gauge whether a series will be successful, and is therefore a test episode of an intended television series. It is an early step in the development of a television series, much like pilot studies serve as precursors to the start of larger activity. In the case of a successful television series, the pilot is commonly the very first episode that is aired of the particular series under its own name. A "back door pilot" is an episode of an existing successful series that features future tie-in characters of an up-and-coming television series or film
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Bar Association
A bar association is a professional association of lawyers. Some bar associations are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession in their jurisdiction; others are professional organizations dedicated to serving their members; in many cases, they are both. In many Commonwealth jurisdictions, the bar association comprises lawyers who are qualified as barristers or advocates in particular, versus solicitors (see bar council). Membership in bar associations may be mandatory or optional for practicing attorneys, depending on jurisdiction.Contents1 Etymology 2 In Commonwealth jurisdictions2.1 Canada 2.2 India 2.3 Pakistan3 In the United States3.1 Mandatory, integrated, or unified bar associations 3.2 Voluntary bar associations 3.3 Judges4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] Main article: Bar (law) The use of the term bar to mean "the whole body of lawyers, the legal profession" comes ultimately from English custom
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Virginia
Virginia
Virginia
(/vərˈdʒɪniə/ ( listen); officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern[6] and Mid-Atlantic[7] regions of the United States
United States
located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains. Virginia
Virginia
is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" due to its status as the first English colonial possession established in mainland North America,[8] and "Mother of Presidents" because eight U.S. presidents were born there, more than any other state. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains
Blue Ridge Mountains
and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach
Virginia Beach
is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision
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New York (state)
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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United States Naval Academy
The United States Naval Academy
United States Naval Academy
(also known as USNA, Annapolis, or simply Navy) is a four-year coeducational federal service academy in Annapolis, Maryland. Established on 10 October 1845, under Secretary of the Navy George Bancroft, it is the second oldest of the United States' five service academies, and educates officers for commissioning primarily into the United States Navy
United States Navy
and United States Marine Corps. The 338-acre (137 ha) campus is located on the former grounds of Fort Severn
Fort Severn
at the confluence of the Severn River and Chesapeake Bay
Chesapeake Bay
in Anne Arundel County, 33 miles (53 km) east of Washington, D.C. and 26 miles (42 km) southeast of Baltimore. The entire campus (known to insiders as "the Yard") is a National Historic Landmark and home to many historic sites, buildings, and monuments
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Major General (United States)
In the United States Army, United States Marine Corps, and United States Air Force, major general is a two-star general-officer rank, with the pay grade of O-8. Major general ranks above brigadier general and below lieutenant general.[1][Note 1] A major general typically commands division-sized units of 10,000 to 15,000 soldiers. Major general is equivalent to the two-star rank of rear admiral in the United States Navy
United States Navy
and United States Coast Guard
United States Coast Guard
and is the highest permanent rank during peacetime in the uniformed services. Higher ranks are technically temporary ranks linked to specific positions, although virtually all officers who have been promoted to those ranks are approved to retire at their highest earned rank.Contents1 Statutory limits 2 Promotion, appointment, and tour length 3 Retirement 4 History4.1 U.S. Army 4.2 Confederate States Army 4.3 U.S. Marine Corps 4.4 U.S
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