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57th United States Congress
The Fifty-seventh United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate
United States Senate
and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from March 4, 1901, to March 4, 1903, during the final six months of U.S. President William McKinley's presidency, and the first year and a half of the first administration of his successor, U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Eleventh Census of the United States in 1890
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James K. Jones
James Kimbrough Jones (September 29, 1839 – June 1, 1908) was a United States Senator. Biography[edit] Born in Marshall County, Mississippi, Jones moved with his father to Dallas County, Arkansas in 1848. He pursued classical studies under a private tutor; he would later study law and was, in 1874, admitted to the bar, practicing in Washington, Arkansas. During the American Civil War, Jones served in the Confederate Army, and returned to his Arkansas plantation afterward. From 1873 to 1879, he was a member of the Arkansas State Senate, and was president of that body from 1877 to 1879. In 1896 and 1900, he was the chairman of the Democratic National Committee.Mary Jones, daughter of James Kimbrough JonesJones was elected as a Democrat to the Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth Congresses (March 4, 1881 – March 3, 1885); he was re-elected to the Forty-ninth but tendered his resignation on February 19, 1885, having been elected to the United States Senate that year
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United States Statutes At Large
The United States Statutes at Large, commonly referred to as the Statutes at Large and abbreviated Stat., are an official record of Acts of Congress and concurrent resolutions passed by the United States Congress. Each act and resolution of Congress is originally published as a slip law, which is classified as either public law (abbreviated Pub.L.) or private law (Pvt.L.), and designated and numbered accordingly. At the end of a Congressional session, the statutes enacted during that session are compiled into bound books, known as "session law" publications. The session law publication for U.S. Federal statutes is called the United States Statutes at Large. In that publication, the public laws and private laws are numbered and organised in chronological order.[1] U.S
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White House
The White House
White House
is the official residence and workplace of the President of the United States. It is located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
and has been the residence of every U.S. President since John Adams
John Adams
in 1800. The term is often used as a metonym for the president and his advisers. The residence was designed by Irish-born architect James Hoban[2] in the neoclassical style. Construction took place between 1792 and 1800 using Aquia Creek sandstone
Aquia Creek sandstone
painted white
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Benjamin Tillman
Benjamin Ryan Tillman (August 11, 1847 – July 3, 1918) was a politician of the Democratic Party who served as Governor of South Carolina from 1890 to 1894, and a United States Senator from 1895 until his death in 1918. A white supremacist who opposed civil rights for blacks, Tillman led a paramilitary group of Red Shirts during South Carolina's violent 1876 election. On the floor of the U.S. Senate, he frequently ridiculed blacks, and boasted of having helped to kill them during that campaign. In the 1880s, Tillman, a wealthy landowner, became dissatisfied with the Democratic leadership and led a movement of white farmers calling for reform. He was initially unsuccessful, though he was instrumental in the founding of Clemson University
Clemson University
as an agricultural school. In 1890, Tillman took control of the state Democratic Party, and was elected governor
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John L. McLaurin
John Lowndes McLaurin (May 9, 1860 – July 29, 1934) was a United States Representative and Senator from South Carolina; born in Red Bluff, South Carolina, he attended schools at Bennettsville, South Carolina and Englewood, New Jersey as well as Bethel Military Academy (near Warrenton, Virginia) and Swarthmore College (in Pennsylvania.) He graduated from the Carolina Military Institute, studied law in the University of Virginia at Charlottesville, was admitted to the bar in 1883 and practiced in Bennettsville. He was a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives in 1890-1891 and was attorney general of the State from 1891 to 1897. McLaurin was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-second Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Eli T. Stackhouse; he was reelected to the Fifty-third, Fifty-fourth, and Fifty-fifth Congresses and served from December 5, 1892, until May 31, 1897, when he resigned. He was appointed and subsequently elected as a Democrat to the U.S
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Anthracite Coal Strike
The Coal strike of 1902 (also known as the anthracite coal strike[1][2]) was a strike by the United Mine Workers of America in the anthracite coalfields of eastern Pennsylvania. Miners struck for higher wages, shorter workdays and the recognition of their union. The strike threatened to shut down the winter fuel supply to major US cities. (At that time, residences were typically heated with anthracite or "hard" coal, which produces higher heat value and less smoke than "soft" or bituminous coal.) President Theodore Roosevelt became involved and set up a fact-finding commission that suspended the strike. The strike never resumed, as the miners received a 10% wage increase and reduced workdays from ten to nine hours; the owners got a higher price for coal, and did not recognize the trade union as a bargaining agent
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United Mine Workers
The United Mine Workers
United Mine Workers
of America (UMW or UMWA) is a North American labor union best known for representing coal miners. Today, the Union also represents health care workers, truck drivers, manufacturing workers and public employees in the United States
United States
and Canada.[1] Although its main focus has always been on workers and their rights, the UMW of today also advocates for better roads, schools, and universal health care.[2] By 2014, coal mining had largely shifted to open pit mines in Wyoming, and there were only 60,000 active coal miners
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Philippine–American War
American victoryAmerican occupation of the Philippines; dissolution of the First Philippine RepublicTerritorial changes The Philippines
Philippines
becomes an unincorporated territory of the United States and, later, a U.S
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Newlands Reclamation Act
The act at first covered only 13 of the western states as Texas had no federal lands. Texas was added later by a special act passed in 1906. The act set aside money from sales of semi-arid public lands for the construction and maintenance of irrigation projects. The newly irrigated land would be sold and money would be put into a revolving fund that supported more such projects. This led to the eventual damming of nearly every major western river. Under the act, the Secretary of the Interior created the United States Reclamation Service within the United States Geological Survey to administer the program. In 1907, the Service became a separate organization within the Department of the Interior and was renamed the United States Bureau of Reclamation. The Act was authored by Democratic Congressional Representative Francis G. Newlands of Nevada
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Panama Canal
The Panama
Panama
Canal
Canal
(Spanish: Canal
Canal
de Panamá) is an artificial 77 km (48 mi) waterway in Panama
Panama
that connects the Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama
Panama
and is a conduit for maritime trade. Canal
Canal
locks are at each end to lift ships up to Gatun Lake, an artificial lake created to reduce the amount of excavation work required for the canal, 26 m (85 ft) above sea level, and then lower the ships at the other end. The original locks are 34 m (110 ft) wide. A third, wider lane of locks was constructed between September 2007 and May 2016. The expanded canal began commercial operation on June 26, 2016
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Militia Act Of 1903
The Militia Act of 1903
Militia Act of 1903
(32 Stat. 775), also known as "The Efficiency in Militia Act of 1903", also known as the Dick Act, was legislation enacted by the United States Congress
United States Congress
which codified the circumstances under which the National Guard could be federalized. It also provided federal funds to the National Guard to pay for equipment and training, including annual summer encampments
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Pan-American Exposition
The Pan-American Exposition
Pan-American Exposition
was a World's Fair held in Buffalo, New York, United States, from May 1 through November 2, 1901. The fair occupied 350 acres (1.4 km2) of land on the western edge of what is now Delaware Park, extending from Delaware Avenue to Elmwood Avenue and northward to Great Arrow Avenue. It is remembered today primarily for being the location of the assassination of President William McKinley.Contents1 History 2 Assassination of President McKinley 3 Buildings and exhibits 4 Attractions 5 Demolition 6 Legacy 7 Statistics 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit] The event was organized by the Pan-American Exposition
Pan-American Exposition
Company, formed in 1897. Cayuga Island was initially chosen as the place to hold the Exposition because of the island's proximity to Niagara Falls, which was a huge tourist attraction
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Expediting Act
The Expediting Act (32 Stat. 823, 15 U.S.C. § 28, 1903-02-11) was introduced in the United States of America
United States of America
by President Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
to break up trusts by the steel, meatpacking, oil, and railroad industries by expediting their cases to the top of the list so they could be dealt with more quickly. This act was passed in 1903. It also added staff to the Antitrust Division of the Justice Department.v t eTheodore Roosevelt26th President of the United States, 1901–1909 25th Vice President of the United States, 1901 33rd Governor of New York, 1899–1900 Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 1897–1898 New York City Police Commissioner, 1895–1897 New York State Assemblyman, 1882 1883 1884PresidencyFirst inaugurationhistoric siteSecond inauguration "Square Deal" Booker T
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Democratic Party (United States)
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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Silver Republican Party (United States)
The Silver Republican Party was a United States
United States
political party in the 1890s. It was so named because it split from the Republican Party over the issues of free silver (effectively, expansionary monetary policy) and bimetallism. The main Republican Party supported the gold standard. Silver Republican strength was concentrated in the Western states where mining, particularly silver mining, was an important industry. Silver Republicans were elected to the Congress from several Western states. In 1896, Silver Republicans supported Democratic presidential nominee William Jennings Bryan
William Jennings Bryan
over William McKinley. After 1900, the Silver Republican Party was on the decline and most of its members rejoined the Republican Party. However, some such as Senator Fred Dubois of Idaho
Idaho
and former Secretary of the Interior Henry M
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