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441-line Television System
441 lines, or 383i if named using modern standard, is an early electronic television system. It was used with 50 interlaced frames per second in France and Germany, where it was an improvement over the previous 180-line system. In the United States it was used by RCA
RCA
with 60 frames per second from 1938 to 1941.System Field frequency Active picture Field blanking No
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Sound-in-Syncs
Sound-in-Syncs is a method of multiplexing sound and video signals into a channel designed to carry video, in which data representing the sound is inserted into the line synchronising pulse of an analogue television waveform. This is used on point-to-point links within broadcasting networks, including studio/transmitter links (STL). It is not used for broadcasts to the public.Contents1 History1.1 Awards2 Versions2.1 Original mono S-i-S 2.2 Ruggedised S-i-S 2.3 Stereo S-i-S 2.4 ITV S-i-S3 Notes and references 4 Further readingHistory[edit] The technique was first developed by the BBC in the late 1960s. In 1966, The corporation's Research Department made a feasibility study of the use of pulse-code modulation (PCM) for transmitting television sound during the synchronising period of the video signal
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European Broadcasting Union
The European Broadcasting Union
European Broadcasting Union
(EBU; French: Union européenne de radio-télévision, UER) is an alliance of public service media organisations, established on 12 February 1950. The organisation is made up of 73 Members in 56 countries,[2] and 34 Associate Members from a further 20 countries.[3] It is best known for producing the Eurovision Song Contest
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EIAJ MTS
Founded in 1948, the Electronic Industries Association of Japan (EIAJ) was one of two Japanese electronics trade organizations that were merged into the Japan Electronics and Information Technology Industries Association (JEITA). Prior to the merger, EIAJ created a number of electronics industry standards that have had some use outside Japan, including:The EIAJ connectors used for DC power (EIAJ RC-5320A, EIAJ RC-5321, and EIAJ RC-5322 The D-Terminal
D-Terminal
connector (RC-5237), used instead of three RCA plugs for component video connections. The TOSLINK
TOSLINK
(EIAJ Optical, RC-5720C) optical S/PDIF audio connector. The EIAJ-1
EIAJ-1
videotape format, the first standardized format for industrial/non-broadcast video tape recording, released in 1969.Another standard is the multi-channel TV sound system used with the NTSC-J analog TV system
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Audio Signal
An audio signal is a representation of sound, typically as an electrical voltage for analog signals and a binary number for digital signals. Audio signals have frequencies in the audio frequency range of roughly 20 to 20,000 Hz (the limits of human hearing). Audio signals may be synthesized directly, or may originate at a transducer such as a microphone, musical instrument pickup, phonograph cartridge, or tape head
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RCA
The RCA
RCA
Corporation was a major American electronics company, which was founded as the Radio
Radio
Corporation of America in 1919. It was initially a wholly owned subsidiary of General Electric
General Electric
(GE); however, in 1932, GE was required to divest its control as part of the settlement of an antitrust suit. At its height as an independent company, RCA
RCA
was the dominant communications firm in the United States. Beginning in the early 1920s, RCA
RCA
was a major manufacturer of radio receivers, and also developed the first national radio network, the National Broadcasting Company (NBC). It had a leading role in the introduction of black-and-white television in the 1940s and 1950s, and color television in the 1950s and 1960s
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Analog Television
Analog television
Analog television
or analogue television is the original television technology that uses analog signals to transmit video and audio.[1] In an analog television broadcast, the brightness, colors and sound are represented by rapid variations of either the amplitude, frequency or phase of the signal. Analog signals vary over a continuous range of possible values which means that electronic noise and interference becomes reproduced by the receiver. So with analog, a moderately weak signal becomes snowy and subject to interference. In contrast, a moderately weak digital signal and a very strong digital signal transmit equal picture quality. Analog television
Analog television
may be wireless or can be distributed over a cable network using cable converters. All broadcast television systems used analog signals before the arrival of digital television (DTV)
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Video
Video
Video
is an electronic medium for the recording, copying, playback, broadcasting, and display of moving visual media.[1] Video
Video
was first developed for mechanical television systems, which were quickly replaced by cathode ray tube (CRT) systems which were later replaced by flat panel displays of several types. Video
Video
systems vary in display resolution, aspect ratio, refresh rate, color capabilities and other qualities
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CCIR System M
A system is a regularly interacting or interdependent group of items forming an integrated whole.[1] Every system is delineated by its spatial and temporal boundaries, surrounded and influenced by its environment, described by its structure and purpose and expressed in its functioning.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Concepts3.1 Subsystem4 Analysis4.1 Cultural system 4.2 Economic system5 Application of the system concept5.1 In information and computer science 5.2 In engineering and physics 5.3 In social and cognitive sciences and management research 5.4 Pure logical systems 5.5 Applied to strategic thinking6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksEtymology[edit] The term "system" comes from the Latin
Latin
word systēma, in turn from Greek σύστημα systēma: "whole concept made of several parts or members, system", literary "composition".[2] History[edit] According to Marshall McLuhan,"System" means "something to look at"
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Second Audio Program
Second audio program (SAP), also known as secondary audio programming, is an auxiliary audio channel for analog television that can be broadcast or transmitted both over-the-air and by cable television. SAP is part of the multichannel television sound (MTS) standard originally set by the National Television Systems Committee (NTSC) in 1984 in the United States
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Eddie Albert
Edward Albert
Edward Albert
Heimberger (April 22, 1906 – May 26, 2005), known professionally as Eddie Albert, was an American actor and activist. He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor
Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor
in 1954 for his performance in Roman Holiday, and in 1973 for The Heartbreak Kid.[1] Other well-known screen roles of his include Bing Edwards in the Brother Rat
Brother Rat
films, traveling salesman Ali Hakim in the musical Oklahoma!, and the sadistic prison warden in 1974's The Longest Yard. He starred as Oliver Wendell Douglas
Oliver Wendell Douglas
in the 1960s television sitcom Green Acres
Green Acres
and as Frank MacBride in the 1970s crime drama Switch
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NBC
The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American English language commercial broadcast television network that is a flagship property of NBCUniversal, a subsidiary of Comcast. The network is headquartered at 30 Rockefeller Plaza
30 Rockefeller Plaza
in New York City, with additional major offices near Los Angeles
Los Angeles
(at 10 Universal City Plaza), and Chicago
Chicago
(at the NBC
NBC
Tower). The network is part of the Big Three television networks. NBC
NBC
is sometimes referred to as the "Peacock Network", in reference to its stylized peacock logo, introduced in 1956 to promote the company's innovations in early color broadcasting
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1939 New York World's Fair
The 1939–40 New York World's Fair, which covered the 1,216 acres (492 ha) of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park
Flushing Meadows-Corona Park
(also the location of the 1964–1965 New York World's Fair), was the second most expansive American world's fair of all time, exceeded only by St. Louis's Louisiana Purchase Exposition
Louisiana Purchase Exposition
of 1904. Many countries around the world participated in it, and over 44 million people attended its exhibits in two seasons.[2] It was the first exposition to be based on the future, with an opening slogan of "Dawn of a New Day", and it allowed all visitors to take a look at "the world of tomorrow"
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World Radio TV Handbook
The World Radio TV Handbook, also known as WRTH, is a directory of virtually every radio and TV station
TV station
on Earth, published yearly. It was started in 1947 by Oluf Lund Johansen (1891–1975) as the World Radio Handbook (WRH).[1] The word "TV" was added to the title in 1965, when Jens M. Frost (1919–1999) took over as editor.[2] It had then already included data for television broadcasting for some years. After the 40th edition in 1986, Frost handed over editorship to Andrew G. (Andy) Sennitt.[3] The first edition that bears an edition number is the 4th edition, published in 1949. The three previous editions appear to have been:the 1st edition, marked "Winter Ed
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Loewe Ag
Loewe Technologies GmbH (pronounced [ˈløːvə]) is the parent company of the German Loewe group. The Loewe group develops, manufactures and sells a wide variety of electronic, electrical and mechanical products and systems, and specialises in the field of consumer and communication technology. The company was founded in Berlin in 1923 by brothers Siegmund and David L. Loewe. The company has its headquarters and sole production facilities in Kronach, Franconia. Today, the range has expanded to include televisions, Blu-ray players, DVD recorders, hard disk recorders, multiroom systems, speakers and racks. The trend is shifting from individual products to complete home entertainment systems. Loewe is also represented internationally by sales partners and subsidiaries. These include subsidiaries in the Benelux countries, France, Italy, Switzerland and the UK
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