HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

410
Year 410
410
(CDX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year after the Consulship of Honorius and Theodosius (or, less frequently, year 1163 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 410
410
for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. Events[edit] By place[edit] Roman Empire[edit]Spring – Constantine III crosses the Alps
Alps
into Liguria
Liguria
(Northern Italy), but retreats to Gaul
Gaul
after Gerontius revolts in Spain against his son Constans II. Emperor Honorius sends his Rescript (diplomatic letters) to the Romano-British magistrates, where he explains that the cities in Britain must provide for their own defence against the Angles, Jutes, and Saxons
[...More...]

"410" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Korean Calendar
The traditional Korean calendar is a lunisolar calendar, like the traditional calendars of other East Asian countries. Dates are calculated from Korea's meridian ( 135th meridian east
135th meridian east
in modern time for South Korea), and observances and festivals are based in Korean culture. The Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
was officially adopted in 1896, but traditional holidays and age-reckoning for older generations are still based on the old calendar.[1] The biggest festival in Korea today is Seollal, the first day of the traditional Korean New Year. Other important festivals include Daeboreum
Daeboreum
also referred to as Boreumdaal (the first full moon), Dano (spring festival) and Chuseok
Chuseok
(harvest moon festival), and Samjinnal
Samjinnal
(spring-opening festival)
[...More...]

"Korean Calendar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rooster (zodiac)
The Rooster
Rooster
(simplified Chinese: 鸡; traditional Chinese: 雞/鷄) is the tenth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Rooster
Rooster
is represented by the Earthly Branch character 酉
[...More...]

"Rooster (zodiac)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Gregorian Calendar
The Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
is internationally the most widely used civil calendar.[1][2][Note 1] It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October
October
1582. It was a refinement to the Julian calendar[3] involving an approximately 0.002% correction in the length of the calendar year. The motivation for the reform was to stop the drift of the calendar with respect to the equinoxes and solstices—particularly the northern vernal equinox, which helps set the date for Easter. Transition to the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
would restore the holiday to the time of the year in which it was celebrated when introduced by the early Church. The reform was adopted initially by the Catholic countries of Europe
[...More...]

"Gregorian Calendar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Millennium
A millennium (plural millennia or millenniums) is a period equal to 1000 years,[1] also called kiloyears. It derives from the Latin
Latin
mille, thousand, and annus, year. It is often, but not always, related to a particular dating system. Sometimes, it is used specifically for periods of a thousand years that begin at the starting point (initial reference point) of the calendar in consideration (typically the year "1"), or in later years that are whole number multiples of a thousand years after it
[...More...]

"Millennium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Balinese Saka Calendar
The Balinese saka calendar
Balinese saka calendar
is one of two calendars used on the Indonesian island of Bali. Unlike the 210-day pawukon calendar, it is based on the phases of the moon, and is approximately the same length as the Gregorian year.Contents1 Months 2 Use 3 Notable days 4 References4.1 NotesMonths[edit]Information about the Saka calendar on a Balinese wall calendarBased on a lunar calendar, the saka year comprises twelve months, or sasih, of 30 days each. However, because the lunar cycle is slightly shorter than 30 days, and the lunar year has a length of 354 or 355 days, the calendar is adjusted to prevent it losing synchronization with the lunar or solar cycles. The months are adjusted by allocating two lunar days to one solar day every 9 weeks. This day is called ngunalatri, Sanskrit
Sanskrit
for "minus one night"
[...More...]

"Balinese Saka Calendar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bengali Calendar
The Bengali Calendar
Calendar
or Bangla Calendar
Calendar
(বঙ্গাব্দ Bônggabdô or Banggabda) is a solar calendar used in the region of Bengal. A revised version of the calendar is the national and official calendar in Bangladesh
Bangladesh
and an earlier version of the calendar is followed in the Indian states of West Bengal, Tripura
Tripura
and Assam. The New Year
New Year
in the Bengali calendar
Bengali calendar
is known as Pohela Boishakh. The Bengali era is called Bengali Sambat (BS)[1] or the Bengali year (বাংলা সন Bangla Sôn, বাংলা সাল Bangla sal, or Bangabda)[2] has a zero year that starts in 593/594 CE
[...More...]

"Bengali Calendar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Berber Calendar
The Berber calendar
Berber calendar
is the agricultural calendar traditionally used by Berbers. It is also known as the fellaḥi (ﻓﻼّﺣﻲ "rustic" or ﻋﺠﻤﻲ ʿajamī "foreign" calendar). The calendar is utilized to regulate the seasonal agricultural works. The Islamic calendar, a lunar calendar is considered by some as ill-adapted for agriculture because it does not relate to seasonal cycles.[1] The current Berber calendar
Berber calendar
is a legacy of the Roman province
Roman province
of Mauretania Caesariensis
Mauretania Caesariensis
and the Roman province
Roman province
of Africa, as it is a surviving form of the Julian calendar. The latter calendar was used in Europe before the adoption of the Gregorian calendar, with month names derived from Latin
[...More...]

"Berber Calendar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chinese Calendar
The traditional Chinese calendar
Chinese calendar
is a lunisolar calendar which reckons years, months and days according to astronomical phenomena. It was developed by the Qin Dynasty. As of 2017[update], the Chinese calendar is defined by GB/T 33661-2017 Calculation and promulgation of the Chinese calendar, which the Standardization Administration of China issued on May 12, 2017. The Chinese calendar
Chinese calendar
governs traditional activities in China and in overseas-Chinese communities. It depicts and lists the dates of traditional Chinese holidays, and guides Chinese people in selecting the most auspicious days for weddings, funerals, moving, or beginning a business. In the Chinese calendar
Chinese calendar
the days begin and end at midnight. The months begin on the day with the dark (new) moon. The years begin with the dark moon near the midpoint between winter solstice and spring equinox
[...More...]

"Chinese Calendar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chinese Sexagenary Cycle
The sexagenary cycle, also known as the Stems-and-Branches or ganzhi, is a cycle of sixty terms used for reckoning time in China and the East Asian cultural sphere.[1] It appears as a means of recording days in the first Chinese written texts, the Shang oracle bones of the late second millennium BC. Its use to record years began around the middle of the 3rd century BC.[2] The cycle and its variations have been an important part of the traditional calendrical systems in Chinese-influenced Asian states and territories, particularly those of Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, with the old Chinese system still in use in Taiwan. This traditional method of numbering days and years no longer has any significant role in modern Chinese time keeping or the official calendar. However, the sexagenary cycle is still used in names of many historical events, such as the Chinese Xinhai Revolution, the Japanese Boshin War, and the Korean Imjin War
[...More...]

"Chinese Sexagenary Cycle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dog (zodiac)
The Dog
Dog
(狗) is eleventh of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac
Chinese zodiac
related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Dog
Dog
is associated with the Earthly Branch symbol 戌
[...More...]

"Dog (zodiac)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

List Of 5th-century Religious Leaders
This is a list of the top-level leaders for religious groups with at least 50,000 adherents, and that led anytime from January 1, 401, to December 31, 500
[...More...]

"List Of 5th-century Religious Leaders" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Coptic Calendar
The Coptic calendar, also called the Alexandrian calendar, is a liturgical calendar used by the Coptic Orthodox Church
Coptic Orthodox Church
and still used in Egypt. This calendar is based on the ancient Egyptian calendar. To avoid the calendar creep of the latter, a reform of the ancient Egyptian calendar
Egyptian calendar
was introduced at the time of Ptolemy III
Ptolemy III
(Decree of Canopus, in 238 BC) which consisted of the intercalation of a sixth epagomenal day every fourth year
[...More...]

"Coptic Calendar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Discordian Calendar
The Discordian or Erisian calendar is an alternative calendar used by some adherents of Discordianism. It is specified on page 00034 of the Principia Discordia.[1] The Discordian year 1 YOLD is 1166 BC. (Elsewhere in the Principia Discordia, it is mentioned that the Curse of Greyface occurred in 1166 BC, so this is presumably related to the start-date of the calendar.[2]) As a reference, AD 2018
2018
is 3184 YOLD (Year of Our Lady of Discord). The abbreviation "YOLD" is not used in the Principia, though the phrase "Year of Our Lady of Discord" is mentioned once.[3]Contents1 Composition 2 Implementations 3 References 4 External linksComposition[edit] As described in the Principia Discordia, the Discordian calendar has five 73-day seasons: Chaos, Discord, Confusion, Bureaucracy, and The Aftermath
[...More...]

"Discordian Calendar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ethiopian Calendar
The Ethiopian calendar
Ethiopian calendar
(Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ ዘመን አቆጣጠር; yä'Ityoṗṗya zämän aḳoṭaṭär) is the principal calendar used in Ethiopia
Ethiopia
and also serves as the liturgical year for Christians in Eritrea
Eritrea
and Ethiopia
Ethiopia
belonging to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church, Eastern Catholic Churches and Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria. It is a solar calendar which in turn derives from the Egyptian Calendar, but like the Julian Calendar, it adds a leap day every four years without exception, and begins the year on August 29 or August 30 in the Julian Calendar
[...More...]

"Ethiopian Calendar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hindu Calendar
Hindu
Hindu
calendar is a collective term for the various lunisolar calendars traditionally used in India. They adopt a similar underlying concept for timekeeping, but differ in their relative emphasis to moon cycle or the sun cycle and the names of months and when they consider the New Year to start.[1] Of the various regional calendars, the most studied and known Hindu
Hindu
calendars are the Vikrami calendar (Bikrami) found in northern, western and central regions of the Indian subcontinent, Tamil calendar found in the south, and the Bengali calendar found in the east – all of which emphasize the lunar cycle, their new year starts in spring, with their heritage dating back to 1st millennium BCE
[...More...]

"Hindu Calendar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.