HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

4/4 Beat
The time signature (also known as meter signature,[1] metre signature,[2] or measure signature[3]) is a notational convention used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats (pulses) are to be contained in each measure (bar) and which note value is equivalent to one beat. In a music score, the time signature appears at the beginning, as a time symbol or stacked numerals, such as or 3 4 (read common time and three-four time, respectively), immediately following the key signature or immediately following the clef symbol if the key signature is empty
[...More...]

"4/4 Beat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Common Time
Common
Common
may refer to:Contents1 Places 2 People 3 Arts, entertainment, and media 4 Religion 5 Science and technology 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPlaces[edit]Common, a townland in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland Boston Common, a central public park in Boston, Massachusetts Cambridge Common, commonland in Cambridge, Massachusetts Common
[...More...]

"Common Time" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tarantella
Tarantella
Tarantella
(Italian pronunciation: [taranˈtɛlla]) is a group of various folk dances characterized by a fast upbeat tempo, usually in 6 8 time (sometimes 18 8 or 4 4), accompanied by tambourines.[2] It is among the most recognized forms of traditional southern Italian music. The specific dance-name varies with every region, for instance tammurriata in Campania, pizzica in the Salento
Salento
region, Sonu a ballu in Calabria. Tarantella
Tarantella
is popular in Southern Italy
Southern Italy
and Argentina
[...More...]

"Tarantella" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Polka
The polka is originally a Czech dance and genre of dance music familiar throughout Europe and the Americas. It originated in the middle of the 19th century in Bohemia, now part of the Czech Republic. Polka
Polka
remains a popular folk music genre in many European countries, and is performed by folk artists in the Czech Republic, Poland, Germany, Austria, Slovenia, Switzerland, and to a lesser extent in Latvia, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Hungary, Italy, Ukraine, Romania, Belarus, Russia, and Slovakia
[...More...]

"Polka" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Galop
In dance, the galop, named after the fastest running gait of a horse (see gallop), a shortened version of the original term galoppade, is a lively country dance, introduced in the late 1820s to Parisian society by the Duchesse de Berry and popular in Vienna, Berlin and London. In the same closed position familiar in the waltz,[citation needed] the step combined a glissade with a chassé on alternate feet, ordinarily in a fast 2 4 time. The galop was a forerunner of the polka, which was introduced in Prague ballrooms in the 1830s and made fashionable in Paris when Raab, a dancing teacher of Prague, danced the polka at the Odéon Theatre, 1840. In Australian bush dance, the dance is often called galopede
[...More...]

"Galop" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Waltz (music)
A waltz (German: Walzer; French: Valse, Italian: Valzer, Spanish: Vals, Polish: Walc), probably deriving from German Ländler, is dance music in triple meter, often written in 3 4 time. A waltz typically sounds one chord per measure, and the accompaniment style particularly associated with the waltz is (as seen in the example to the right) to play the root of the chord on the first beat, the upper notes on the second and third beats.Contents1 History 2 Jazz
Jazz
waltzes 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingHistory[edit] The name "waltz" comes from the German verb walzen
[...More...]

"Waltz (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Minuet
A minuet (/ˌmɪnjuːˈɛt/; also spelled menuet) is a social dance of French origin for two people, usually in 3 4 time
[...More...]

"Minuet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Scherzo
A scherzo (/ˈskɛrt.soʊ/; Italian pronunciation: [ˈskertso]; plural scherzos or scherzi), in western classical music, is a piece, sometimes a movement from a larger work such as a symphony or a sonata. The precise definition has varied over the years, but scherzo often refers to a movement that replaces the minuet as the third movement in a four-movement work, such as a symphony, sonata, or string quartet.[1] The term can also refer to a fast-moving humorous composition that may or may not be part of a larger work.[2]Contents1 Origins 2 Form 3 Appearance/examples in compositions 4 ReferencesOrigins[edit] The word "scherzo," meaning "joke," or "jest" in Italian, is related to the same-root verb: scherzare ("to joke". "to jest"; "to play"). More rarely the similar meaning word "badinerie" (also spelled "battinerie"; from French "jesting") has been used
[...More...]

"Scherzo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Polonaise
The polonaise (/pɒləˈneɪz/, French: [pɔlɔnɛz]; Polish: polonez) is a dance of Polish origin,[2] in 3 4 time. Its name is French for "Polish." The polonaise has a rhythm quite close to that of the Swedish semiquaver or sixteenth-note polska, and the two dances have a common origin. Polonaise
Polonaise
is a widespread dance in carnival parties
[...More...]

"Polonaise" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mazurka
The mazurka (in Polish mazurek, plural mazurki) is a Polish folk dance in triple meter, usually at a lively tempo, and with "strong accents unsystematically placed on the second or third beat"[2].Contents1 History 2 Outside Poland2.1 Cape Verde
Cape Verde
Islands 2.2 Czech Republic and its forerunners 2.3 France 2.4 Ireland 2.5 Latin America2.5.1 Brazil 2.5.2 Cuba 2.5.3 Curaçao2.6 Philippines 2.7 Portugal 2.8 Russia 2.9 Sweden 2.10 USA3 Media 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Bibliography 7 External linksHistory[edit] The folk origins of the mazurek are two other Polish musical forms which are the slow kujawiak, and the fast oberek. The mazurek is always found to have either a triplet, trill, dotted eighth note (quaver) pair, or an ordinary eighth note pair before two quarter notes (crotchets). In the 19th century, the dance became popular in many ballrooms in different parts of Europe
[...More...]

"Mazurka" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jig
The jig (Irish: port) is a form of lively folk dance in compound metre, as well as the accompanying dance tune. It developed in 16th-century England, and was quickly adopted on mainland Europe where it eventually became the final movement of the mature Baroque
Baroque
dance suite (the French gigue; Italian and Spanish giga).[1] Today it is most associated with Irish dance
Irish dance
music, Scottish country dance
Scottish country dance
and the Métis people in Canada.[2] Jigs were originally in duple compound metre, (e.g., 12 8 time), but have been adapted to a variety of time signatures, by which they are often classified into groups, including light jigs, slip jigs, single jigs, double jigs, and treble jigs
[...More...]

"Jig" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sega Music
Sega (French: Séga) is one of the major music genres of Mauritius, the others being its fusion genre Seggae and Bhojpuri songs. It has origins in the music of slaves on the island, and is usually sung in creole. Sega is also a popular music on the islands of Agalega
Agalega
and Rodrigues
Rodrigues
as well as Réunion
Réunion
and Seychelles, though the music and dances differs and it is sung in these islands' respective creole languages
[...More...]

"Sega Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Salegy
Salegy
Salegy
[ˈsaleɡʲ] is a popular music genre from Madagascar. Originating as a Sub-Saharan African folk music style in the northwestern coastal areas of Madagascar, modern salegy is the genre of Malagasy music that has gained the widest recognition and commercial popularity in the international market. Its sound is considered emblematic of the island.[1] Eusèbe Jaojoby, a Sakalava singer from Antsiranana, was a key originator of the style and is widely considered the "King of Salegy".[2] The contemporary, electrified form of popular salegy originated from traditional acoustic roots in northwestern Madagascar
Madagascar
around Mahajanga and Antsiranana
Antsiranana
in the 1950s.[3] It has been popularized by originators like Jaojoby and relative newcomers such as Ninie Doniah, Vaiavy Chila and Dr. J.B. and the Jaguars
[...More...]

"Salegy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Barcarolle
A barcarolle (from French, also barcarole; originally, Italian barcarola or barcaruola, from barca 'boat')[1] is a traditional folk song sung by Venetian gondoliers, or a piece of music composed in that style
[...More...]

"Barcarolle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

March (music)
A march, as a musical genre, is a piece of music with a strong regular rhythm which in origin was expressly written for marching to and most frequently performed by a military band. In mood, marches range from the moving death march in Wagner's Götterdämmerung
Götterdämmerung
to the brisk military marches of John Philip Sousa
John Philip Sousa
and the martial hymns of the late 19th century
[...More...]

"March (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Loure
The loure, also known as the gigue lente or slow gigue, is a slow French Baroque dance, probably originating in Normandy
Normandy
and named after the sound of the instrument of the same name (a type of musette). The loure is a dance of slow or moderate tempo, sometimes in simple triple meter, more often in compound duple meter. The weight is on the first beat, which is further emphasised by the preceding anacrusis that begins the traditional loure. One of its features is a lilting dotted rhythm. In his Musicalisches Lexicon (Leipzig, 1732), Johann Gottfried Walther wrote that the loure "is slow and ceremonious; the first note of each half-measure is dotted which should be well observed".[1] Examples of loures are found in the works of Lully (e.g., Alceste) and of Bach (e.g.: French Suite No. 5[2] and the Partita No. 3 for violin solo). References[edit]^ Bach. The French Suites: Embellished version. Barenreiter Urtext ^ N
[...More...]

"Loure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.