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383417 DAO
This is a partial list of minor planets, running from 383001 through 384000, inclusive. For an overview of the entire catalog of numbered minor planets, see main index
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List Of Minor Planets
This is a list of numbered minor planets in the Solar System, in numerical order. As of April 2018[update] there are 757,626 minor planets of which 516,386 are numbered (secured discoveries). Every month, several thousand minor planets are newly numbered and added to this list (see index).[1][2] It is expected that the upcoming survey by the LSST
LSST
will discover another 5 million minor planets during the next ten years—a tenfold increase from current numbers.[3] While all asteroids with a diameter above 10 kilometers have already been discovered, there might be as many as 10 trillion 1-meter-sized asteroids or larger out to the orbit of Jupiter;[4] and more than a trillion minor planets in the Kuiper belt. There are 21,264 named minor planets mostly for people and figures from mythology and fiction.[2] Approximately 96% of all numbered objects remain unnamed
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Mauna Kea Observatory
The Mauna Kea
Mauna Kea
Observatories (MKO) are a number of independent astronomical research facilities and large telescope observatories that are located at the summit of Mauna Kea
Mauna Kea
on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi, United States
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Campo Imperatore Near Earth Object Survey
The CINEOS program ( Campo Imperatore
Campo Imperatore
Near-Earth Object Survey), started in 2001, is dedicated to the discovery and follow-up of near-Earth objects (NEOs), namely asteroids and comets which periodically approach or intersect the Earth's orbit. In particular CINEOS is addressed to the discovery of Atens
Atens
and Interior-Earth Objects (IEOs) by extending survey coverage at small solar elongations, and to the discovery of the other kind of NEOs by observing with longer exposures (up to a limiting magnitude of 21) in the opposition region. Between August 2001 and November 2004, CINEOS measured more than 61000 asteroid positions and discovered more than 1500 new objects, including several NEOs and one Centaur (planetoid)
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Lowell Observatory, Anderson Mesa Station
Anderson Mesa
Anderson Mesa
Station is an astronomical observatory established in 1959 as a dark-sky observing site for Lowell Observatory
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Lowell Observatory Near-Earth-Object Search
Lowell Observatory
Lowell Observatory
Near-Earth-Object Search (LONEOS) was a project designed to discover asteroids and comets that orbit near the Earth. The project, funded by NASA, was directed by astronomer Ted Bowell of Lowell Observatory
Lowell Observatory
in Flagstaff, Arizona. The LONEOS project began in 1993 and ran until the end of February 2008.Contents1 Hardware 2 Technique 3 Discoveries3.1 NEO-discovery statistics4 Other science 5 Highlights 6 LONEOS staff 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHardware[edit] LONEOS, in its final configuration, used a 0.6-meter f/1.8 Schmidt telescope, acquired from Ohio Wesleyan University
Ohio Wesleyan University
in 1990, and a Lowell-built 16 megapixel CCD detector. This combination of instruments provided a field of view of 2.88 by 2.88 degrees (8.3 square degrees)
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Observatoire Royal De Belgique
The Royal Observatory of Belgium
Royal Observatory of Belgium
(Dutch: Koninklijke Sterrenwacht van België; French: Observatoire Royal de Belgique), has been situated in Uccle
Uccle
(Ukkel in Dutch) since 1890. It was first established in Saint-Josse-ten-Noode
Saint-Josse-ten-Noode
in 1826 by William I under the impulse of Adolphe Quetelet. It was home to a 100 cm diameter aperture Zeiss reflector in the first half of the 20th century, one of the largest telescopes in the world at the time
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Thierry Pauwels
Thierry Pauwels (born 2 July 1957, Ghent) is a Belgian astronomer from the Royal Observatory of Belgium.[2][3] Between 1996 and 2008 he discovered and co-discovered 146 minor planets. This makes him one of the top 100 minor planet discoverers.[1] The main-belt asteroid 12761 Pauwels, discovered by his college Eric Elst at La Silla Observatory in 1993, was named after him in 1993.[2] Naming citation was published on 18 March 2003 (M.P.C
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Goodricke-Pigott Observatory
The Goodricke-Pigott Observatory
Goodricke-Pigott Observatory
is a private astronomical observatory in Tucson, Arizona.[1] It was formally dedicated on October 26, 1996, and observations began that evening with imaging of Comet Hale–Bopp. The observatory is named after John Goodricke
John Goodricke
and Edward Pigott, two late-eighteenth century astronomers who lived in York, England. Observatory telescopes[edit] The observatory opened with a Celestron C14, 0.35-meter aperture, f/11 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. This instrument has been upgraded with a new optics lens and a new clock drive, and an ST-4 star tracker was attached to the telescope's side to correct a two-minute, ten-arc second periodic motional error. There is another telescope dubbed MOTESS (Moving Object and Transient Event Search System) which is essentially a giant camera aimed at the sky. See also[edit]Roy A. TuckerReferences[edit]^ "Goodricke-Pigott Observatory"
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Roy A. Tucker
Roy A. Tucker (born 1951 in Jackson, Mississippi) is an American astronomer best known for the co-discovery of near-Earth asteroid 99942 Apophis
99942 Apophis
(formerly known as 2004 MN4) along with David J. Tholen and Fabrizio Bernardi of the University of Hawaii.[2] He is a prolific discoverer of minor planets, credited by the Minor Planet Center with the discovery of 702 numbered minor planets between 1996 and 2010.[1] He has also discovered two comets: 328P/LONEOS–Tucker and C/2004 Q1, a Jupiter-family and near-parabolic comet, respectively.[3][4] Tucker was raised in Memphis, Tennessee
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Junk Bond Observatory
The Junk Bond Observatory
Junk Bond Observatory
(JBO; code: 701) is located in the Sonoran Desert at Sierra Vista, Arizona, United States. It was established by amateur astronomer David Healy in his backyard in 1996, [2] using a Celestron 14 SCT and a 16-inch Meade LX200 telescopes in a roll-off shelter. In 2000, a 20" Ritchey-Chretien was installed, to be replaced by a 32" Ritchey in 2004. Asteroid searches began in 1998 using a local computer network and search software. The first discovery at the observatory was made by Jeff Medkeff in June 1999. It was named 38203 Sanner after Glen Sanner also a member of the Huachuca Astronomy Club.[3] As of November 2016, a total of 272 numbered minor planets have been discovered at the observatory, using a 32-inch telescope. The Minor Planet Center credits 219 of these discoveries to David Healy and/or Jeff Medkeff
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David Healy (astronomer)
David B. Healy (22 December 1936 – 6 June 2011) was an American astrophotographer and asteroid discoverer who is known for his contributions to Burnham's Celestial Handbook.[2] History[edit] David B. Healy was born 1936 in Los Angeles, California. He was an automotive industry analyst for Drexel Burnham in New York and later a stock broker before retiring to Arizona. He dedicated his life to Astronomy and the discovery of planets. While in New York, he was a longtime member of the Astronomical Society of Long Island. Once in Sierra Vista, Arizona, he became a valued member of the Huachuca Astronomy Club. He was well known for his pioneering work in astrophotography (in particular with cooled and hypered emulsion astrophotography before silver became silicon) with multiple contributions to leading astronomy publications
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David J. Tholen
David James Tholen (born 1955) is an American astronomer at the Institute for Astronomy of the University of Hawaii. He holds a 1984 PhD from the University of Arizona, and specializes in planetary and Solar System
Solar System
astronomy. He is a discoverer of minor planets and known for the Tholen spectral classification scheme used on asteroids.[2]Contents1 Professional life 2 Personal interests 3 List of discovered minor planets 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksProfessional life[edit] Tholen has discovered a number of asteroids, including the lost 1998 DK36, which may be an Apohele asteroid, and 2004 XZ130, which certainly is; in fact, it had the smallest semimajor axis and aphelion distance among the known asteroids (and still holds both records among numbered asteroids as of March 2010[3]). He won the H. C
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Marc W. Buie
Marc William Buie
Marc William Buie
(/ˈbuːiː/; born 1958) is an American astronomer and prolific discoverer of minor planets, who used to be at Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, and also the Sentinel Space Telescope Mission Scientist for the B612 Foundation, which is dedicated to protecting Earth from asteroid impact events. In 2008 Marc Buie moved to Boulder, Colorado to work at the Southwest Research Institute in the Space Science Department.[2][3]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 List of discovered minor planets 4 References 5 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Buie grew up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
and received his B.Sc. in physics from Louisiana State University
Louisiana State University
in 1980. He then switched fields and earned his Ph.D. in Planetary Science from the University of Arizona in 1984. Dr
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Apache Point Observatory
The Apache Point Observatory
Observatory
(APO; obs. code: 705) is an astronomical observatory located in the Sacramento Mountains
Sacramento Mountains
in Sunspot, New Mexico, United States, approximately 18 miles (29 km) south of Cloudcroft. The observatory is operated by New Mexico
New Mexico
State University (NMSU) and owned by the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC). Access to the telescopes and buildings is restricted, but the public is able to visit the grounds.[1]Contents1 History 2 Telescopes2.1 ARC 3.5 m 2.2 SDSS 2.5 m 2.3 NMSU 1.0 m 2.4 0.5 m ARCSAT 2.5 Former telescopes3 List of discovered minor planets 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]Sunspot Astronomy
Astronomy
and Visitor's CenterThe ARC was formed in 1984 with the goal of building the 3.5 m telescope
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Andrew C. Becker
This is a list of all astronomers who are credited by the Minor Planet Center (MPC) with the discovery of one or several minor planets.[1] A second table lists all institutional discoverers of minor planets such as observatories and surveys (see § Discovering dedicated institutions). As of March 2018[update], the MPC credits a total of 514,567 numbered minor planets to 1014 astronomers and 234 institutional discoverers (e.g. observatories, telescopes and surveys), respectively. For a detailed description of the table's content, see § Notes.Contents1 Discovering astronomers 2 Discovering dedicated institutions 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksDiscovering astronomers[edit]Astronomer Discoveries DOB–DOD Country Link-label; info, links, and notes Name(s) at MPC CiteHiroshi Abe (astronomer) 28 1958–pres.H. Abe; H. Abe MPCMasanao Abe 2 1967–pres.M. Abe; disc: MPC and MPC M. Abe MPCMark Abraham (astronomer) 3 n.a.M. Abraham; amateur, Src M
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