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300
Year 300
300
(CCC) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantius and Valerius (or, less frequently, year 1053 Ab urbe condita)
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Korean Calendar
The traditional Korean calendar is a lunisolar calendar, like the traditional calendars of other East Asian countries. Dates are calculated from Korea's meridian ( 135th meridian east
135th meridian east
in modern time for South Korea), and observances and festivals are based in Korean culture. The Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
was officially adopted in 1896, but traditional holidays and age-reckoning for older generations are still based on the old calendar.[1] The biggest festival in Korea today is Seollal, the first day of the traditional Korean New Year. Other important festivals include Daeboreum
Daeboreum
also referred to as Boreumdaal (the first full moon), Dano (spring festival) and Chuseok
Chuseok
(harvest moon festival), and Samjinnal
Samjinnal
(spring-opening festival)
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Discordian Calendar
The Discordian or Erisian calendar is an alternative calendar used by some adherents of Discordianism. It is specified on page 00034 of the Principia Discordia.[1] The Discordian year 1 YOLD is 1166 BC. (Elsewhere in the Principia Discordia, it is mentioned that the Curse of Greyface occurred in 1166 BC, so this is presumably related to the start-date of the calendar.[2]) As a reference, AD 2018
2018
is 3184 YOLD (Year of Our Lady of Discord). The abbreviation "YOLD" is not used in the Principia, though the phrase "Year of Our Lady of Discord" is mentioned once.[3]Contents1 Composition 2 Implementations 3 References 4 External linksComposition[edit] As described in the Principia Discordia, the Discordian calendar has five 73-day seasons: Chaos, Discord, Confusion, Bureaucracy, and The Aftermath
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Berber Calendar
The Berber calendar
Berber calendar
is the agricultural calendar traditionally used by Berbers. It is also known as the fellaḥi (ﻓﻼّﺣﻲ "rustic" or ﻋﺠﻤﻲ ʿajamī "foreign" calendar). The calendar is utilized to regulate the seasonal agricultural works. The Islamic calendar, a lunar calendar is considered by some as ill-adapted for agriculture because it does not relate to seasonal cycles.[1] The current Berber calendar
Berber calendar
is a legacy of the Roman province
Roman province
of Mauretania Caesariensis
Mauretania Caesariensis
and the Roman province
Roman province
of Africa, as it is a surviving form of the Julian calendar. The latter calendar was used in Europe before the adoption of the Gregorian calendar, with month names derived from Latin
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Byzantine Calendar
The Byzantine calendar, also called "Creation Era of Constantinople" or " Era of the World" (Ancient Greek: Ἔτη Γενέσεως Κόσμου κατὰ Ῥωμαίους,[1] also Ἔτος Κτίσεως Κόσμου or Ἔτος Κόσμου, abbreviated as ε.Κ.), was the calendar used by the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
from c. 691 to 1728 in the Ecumenical Patriarchate. It was also the official calendar of the Byzantine Empire[note 1] from 988 to 1453, and of Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
and Russia from c. 988 to 1700. The calendar was based on the Julian calendar, except that the year started on 1 September and the year number used an Anno Mundi
Anno Mundi
epoch derived from the Septuagint
Septuagint
version of the Bible
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299
Year 99 (CCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Valerius and Valerius (or, less frequently, year 1052 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 99 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. Events[edit] By place[edit] Roman Empire[edit]Peace of Nisibis: Galerius signs a treaty with the Persian king Narseh that will last for 40 years. The Persians accept Roman dominion over Armenia and northern Mesopotamia
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298
Year 12 (CCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Faustus and Gallus (or, less frequently, year 1051 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 29 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.Contents1 Events1.1 By place1.1.1 Roman Empire 1.1.2 Persia 1.1.3 Asia2 Births 3 Deaths 4 ReferencesEvents[edit] By place[edit] Roman Empire[edit]Battle of Lingones: Constantius Chlorus defeats the Alamanni in the territory of the Lingones (Langres) in Gaul
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Chinese Calendar
The traditional Chinese calendar
Chinese calendar
is a lunisolar calendar which reckons years, months and days according to astronomical phenomena. It was developed by the Qin Dynasty. As of 2017[update], the Chinese calendar is defined by GB/T 33661-2017 Calculation and promulgation of the Chinese calendar, which the Standardization Administration of China issued on May 12, 2017. The Chinese calendar
Chinese calendar
governs traditional activities in China and in overseas-Chinese communities. It depicts and lists the dates of traditional Chinese holidays, and guides Chinese people in selecting the most auspicious days for weddings, funerals, moving, or beginning a business. In the Chinese calendar
Chinese calendar
the days begin and end at midnight. The months begin on the day with the dark (new) moon. The years begin with the dark moon near the midpoint between winter solstice and spring equinox
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Chinese Sexagenary Cycle
The sexagenary cycle, also known as the Stems-and-Branches or ganzhi, is a cycle of sixty terms used for reckoning time in China and the East Asian cultural sphere.[1] It appears as a means of recording days in the first Chinese written texts, the Shang oracle bones of the late second millennium BC. Its use to record years began around the middle of the 3rd century BC.[2] The cycle and its variations have been an important part of the traditional calendrical systems in Chinese-influenced Asian states and territories, particularly those of Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, with the old Chinese system still in use in Taiwan. This traditional method of numbering days and years no longer has any significant role in modern Chinese time keeping or the official calendar. However, the sexagenary cycle is still used in names of many historical events, such as the Chinese Xinhai Revolution, the Japanese Boshin War, and the Korean Imjin War
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Coptic Calendar
The Coptic calendar, also called the Alexandrian calendar, is a liturgical calendar used by the Coptic Orthodox Church
Coptic Orthodox Church
and still used in Egypt. This calendar is based on the ancient Egyptian calendar. To avoid the calendar creep of the latter, a reform of the ancient Egyptian calendar
Egyptian calendar
was introduced at the time of Ptolemy III
Ptolemy III
(Decree of Canopus, in 238 BC) which consisted of the intercalation of a sixth epagomenal day every fourth year
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List Of Centuries
The pages listed below contain information about trends and events in particular centuries and millennia.v t eCenturies and millenniaMillennium CenturyBC (BCE)4th 40th 39th 38th 37th 36th 35th 34th 33rd 32nd 31st3rd 30th 29th 28th 27th 26th 25th 24th 23rd 22nd 21st2nd 20th 19th 18th 17th 16th 15th 14th 13th 12th 11th1st 10th 9th 8th 7th 6th 5th 4th 3rd 2nd 1stAD (CE)1st 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th2nd 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th3rd 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30thSee also[edit]List of millennia List of decades List of years List of timelines Chronology See calendar and list of calendars for other groupings of years. See history, history by period, and periodization for different organizations of historical events. For earlier time periods, see Timeline of the Big Bang, Geologic time scale, Timeline of evolution, and Logarithmic timeline.
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Kali Yuga
Kali
Kali
Yuga
Yuga
(Devanāgarī: कलियुग [kəli juɡə], lit. "age of Kali", or "age of vice") is the last of the four stages (or ages or yugas) the world goes through as part of a 'cycle of yugas' (i.e. Mahayuga) described in the Sanskrit scriptures.[1] The other ages are called Satya Yuga, Treta Yuga, and Dvapara Yuga. Kali
Kali
Yuga
Yuga
is associated with the demon Kali
Kali
(not to be confused with the goddess Kālī)
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Julian Calendar
The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
in 46 BC (708 AUC), was a reform of the Roman calendar.[1] It took effect on 1 January
January
45 BC (AUC 709), by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII. The Julian calendar
Julian calendar
gains against the mean tropical year at the rate of one day in 128 years. For the Gregorian calendar, the figure is one day in 3,030 years.[2] The difference in the average length of the year between Julian (365.25 days) and Gregorian (365.2425 days) is 0.002%. The Julian calendar
Julian calendar
has a regular year of 365 days divided into 12 months, as listed in the table below. A leap day is added to February every four years
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Assyrian Calendar
The Assyrian calendar is a lunar calendar which begins in the year 4750 BC, begun by the internal date of the foundation of Assur. [1][2] The year begins with the first sight of Spring.[clarification needed] The Assyrian new year is still celebrated every year with festivals and gatherings. As of April 2018 AD, it is the 6768th year of the Assyrian calendar, and this calendar is used among many Assyrian communities. It begins 4,750 years before the Gregorian calendar
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Calendar Era
A calendar era is the year numbering system used by a calendar. For example, the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
numbers its years in the Western Christian era
Christian era
(the Coptic Orthodox and Ethiopian Orthodox churches have their own Christian eras). The instant, date, or year from which time is marked is called the epoch of the era. There are many different calendar eras such as Saka
Saka
Era. In antiquity, regnal years were counted from the accession of a monarch. This makes the Chronology of the ancient Near East
Chronology of the ancient Near East
very difficult to reconstruct, based on disparate and scattered king lists, such as the Sumerian King List
Sumerian King List
and the Babylonian Canon of Kings
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Monkey (zodiac)
The Monkey
Monkey
(猴) is the ninth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac
Chinese zodiac
related to the Chinese calendar
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