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2015 KH162
2015 KH162
2015 KH162
is a large trans-Neptunian object and highly likely dwarf planet orbiting in the scattered disc region of the outermost Solar System. It measures approximately 700 kilometers in diameter.[1][2][3]Contents1 Orbit 2 Discovery 3 References 4 External linksOrbit[edit] 2015 KH162
2015 KH162
orbits the Sun at a distance of 41.6–83.0 AU once every 491 years and 6 months (179,531 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.33 and an inclination of 29° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] Discovery[edit] It was first observed on 18 May 2015, in the constellation of Serpens by astronomers at the Mauna Kea Observatories
Mauna Kea Observatories
using the Subaru telescope. The discovery was announced by Scott Sheppard, David Tholen and C. Trujillo on 23 February 2016
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List Of Minor Planet Discoverers
This is a list of all astronomers who are credited by the Minor Planet Center (MPC) with the discovery of one or several minor planets.[1] A second table lists all institutional discoverers of minor planets such as observatories and surveys (see § Discovering dedicated institutions). As of March 2018[update], the MPC credits a total of 514,567 numbered minor planets to 1014 astronomers and 234 institutional discoverers (e.g. observatories, telescopes and surveys), respectively. For a detailed description of the table's content, see § Notes.Contents1 Discovering astronomers 2 Discovering dedicated institutions 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksDiscovering astronomers[edit]Astronomer Discoveries DOB–DOD Country Link-label; info, links, and notes Name(s) at MPC CiteHiroshi Abe (astronomer) 28 1958–pres.H. Abe; H. Abe MPCMasanao Abe 2 1967–pres.M. Abe; disc: MPC and MPC M. Abe MPCMark Abraham (astronomer) 3 n.a.M. Abraham; amateur, Src M
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JPL Small-Body Database
The JPL Small-Body Database
Database
(SBDB) is an astronomy database about small Solar System bodies. It is maintained by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA
NASA
and provides data for all known asteroids and several comets, including orbital parameters and diagrams, physical diagrams, and lists of publications related to the small body. The database is updated on a daily basis.[1]Contents1 Close-approach data 2 Orbit
Orbit
diagram 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksClose-approach data[edit] As of August 2013 (planetary ephemeris DE431) close-approach data is available for the major planets and the 16 most massive asteroids. Close approach data is available by adding ";cad=1" to the end of the URL.[citation needed] Orbit
Orbit
diagram[edit] A Java applet is available and provided as a 3D orbit visualization tool
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Geometric Albedo
In astronomy, the geometric albedo of a celestial body is the ratio of its actual brightness as seen from the light source (i.e. at zero phase angle) to that of an idealized flat, fully reflecting, diffusively scattering (Lambertian) disk with the same cross-section. (This phase angle refers to the direction of the light paths and is not a phase angle in its normal meaning in optics or electronics.) Diffuse scattering implies that radiation is reflected isotropically with no memory of the location of the incident light source. Zero phase angle corresponds to looking along the direction of illumination
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Apparent Magnitude
The apparent magnitude (m) of a celestial object is a number that is a measure of its brightness as seen by an observer on Earth. The brighter an object appears, the lower its magnitude value (i.e. inverse relation). The Sun, at apparent magnitude of −27, is the brightest object in the sky. It is adjusted to the value it would have in the absence of the atmosphere. Furthermore, the magnitude scale is logarithmic. A difference of 1 in magnitude corresponds to a change in brightness by a factor of 5√100, or about 2.512. The measurement of apparent magnitudes or brightnesses of celestial objects is known as photometry. Apparent magnitudes are used to quantify the brightness of sources at ultraviolet, visible, and infrared wavelengths. An apparent magnitude is usually measured in a specific passband corresponding to some photometric system such as the UBV system
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Scattered Disc
The scattered disc (or scattered disk) is a distant circumstellar disc in the Solar System
Solar System
that is sparsely populated by icy small solar system bodies, and are a subset of the broader family of trans-Neptunian objects. The scattered-disc objects (SDOs) have orbital eccentricities ranging as high as 0.8, inclinations as high as 40°, and perihelia greater than 30 astronomical units (4.5×109 km; 2.8×109 mi). These extreme orbits are thought to be the result of gravitational "scattering" by the gas giants, and the objects continue to be subject to perturbation by the planet Neptune. Although the closest scattered-disc objects approach the Sun
Sun
at about 30–35 AU, their orbits can extend well beyond 100 AU
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Solar System
The Solar System[a] is the gravitationally bound system comprising the Sun
Sun
and the objects that orbit it, either directly or indirectly.[b] Of those objects that orbit the Sun
Sun
directly, the largest eight are the planets,[c] with the remainder being smaller objects, such as dwarf planets and small Solar System
Solar System
bodies. Of the objects that orbit the Sun
Sun
indirectly, the moons, two are larger than the smallest planet, Mercury.[d] The Solar System
Solar System
formed 4.6 billion years ago from the gravitational collapse of a giant interstellar molecular cloud. The vast majority of the system's mass is in the Sun, with the majority of the remaining mass contained in Jupiter. The four smaller inner planets, Mercury, Venus, Earth
Earth
and Mars, are terrestrial planets, being primarily composed of rock and metal
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Ecliptic
The ecliptic is the circular path on the celestial sphere that the Sun appears to follow over the course of a year; it is the basis of the ecliptic coordinate system
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Serpens
Serpens
Serpens
("the Serpent", Greek Ὄφις) is a constellation of the northern hemisphere. One of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy, it remains one of the 88 modern constellations defined by the International Astronomical Union. It is unique among the modern constellations in being split into two non-contiguous parts, Serpens
Serpens
Caput (Serpent Head) to the west and Serpens
Serpens
Cauda (Serpent Tail) to the east. Between these two halves lies the constellation of Ophiuchus, the "Serpent-Bearer"
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Subaru Telescope
Subaru Telescope
Subaru Telescope
(すばる望遠鏡, Subaru Bōenkyō) is the 8.2-meter (320 in) flagship telescope of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, located at the Mauna Kea Observatory on Hawaii. It is named after the open star cluster known in English as the Pleiades
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Minor Planet
A minor planet is an astronomical object in direct orbit around the Sun
Sun
(or more broadly, any star with a planetary system) that is neither a planet nor exclusively classified as a comet.[a] Before 2006 the International Astronomical Union
International Astronomical Union
(IAU) officially used the term minor planet, but during that year's meeting it reclassified minor planets and comets into dwarf planets and small Solar System
Solar System
bodies (SSSBs).[1] Minor planets can be dwarf planets, asteroids, trojans, centaurs, Kuiper belt
Kuiper belt
objects, and other trans-Neptunian objects.[2] As of 2018, the orbits of 757,626 minor planets were archived at the Minor Planet Center, 516,386 of which had received permanent numbers (for the complete list, see index).[3] The first minor planet to be discovered was Ceres in 1801
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Magnitude (astronomy)
In astronomy, magnitude is a logarithmic measure of the brightness of an object in a defined passband, often in the visible or infrared spectrum, but sometimes across all wavelengths. An imprecise but systematic determination of the magnitude of objects was introduced in ancient times by Hipparchus. Astronomers use two different definitions of magnitude: apparent magnitude and absolute magnitude. The apparent magnitude (mV) is the brightness of an object as it appears in the night sky from Earth, while the absolute magnitude (MV) describes the intrinsic brightness of an object as it would appear if it were placed at a certain distance from Earth, 10 parsecs for stars. A more complex definition of absolute magnitude is used for planets and small Solar System bodies, based on its brightness at one astronomical unit from the observer and the Sun. The brighter an object appears, the lower the value of its magnitude, with the brightest objects reaching negative values
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Jet Propulsion Laboratory
The Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
(JPL) is a federally funded research and development center and NASA
NASA
field center in Pasadena, California,[1] United States, with large portions of the campus in La Cañada Flintridge, California. The JPL is owned by NASA
NASA
and managed by the nearby California Institute of Technology (Caltech) for NASA. The laboratory's primary function is the construction and operation of planetary robotic spacecraft, though it also conducts Earth-orbit and astronomy missions
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Argument Of Periapsis
The argument of periapsis (also called argument of perifocus or argument of pericenter), symbolized as ω, is one of the orbital elements of an orbiting body. Parametrically, ω is the angle from the body's ascending node to its periapsis, measured in the direction of motion. For specific types of orbits, words such as perihelion (for heliocentric orbits), perigee (for geocentric orbits), periastron (for orbits around stars), and so on may replace the word periapsis. (See apsis for more information.) An argument of periapsis of 0° means that the orbiting body will be at its closest approach to the central body at the same moment that it crosses the plane of reference from South to North. An argument of periapsis of 90° means that the orbiting body will reach periapsis at its northmost distance from the plane of reference. Adding the argument of periapsis to the longitude of the ascending node gives the longitude of the periapsis
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Asteroid Belt
The asteroid belt is the circumstellar disc in the Solar System located roughly between the orbits of the planets Mars
Mars
and Jupiter. It is occupied by numerous irregularly shaped bodies called asteroids or minor planets
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