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2013 World Championships In Athletics – Men's 200 Metres
The men's 200 metres
200 metres
at the 2013 World Championships in Athletics
2013 World Championships in Athletics
was held at the Luzhniki Stadium
Luzhniki Stadium
on 16 and 17 August.[1] In the final, Adam Gemili
Adam Gemili
seemed to get the best start, but flanked by the Jamaican uniforms, he was quickly swallowed up. Mid way into the turn, Usain Bolt
Usain Bolt
had a clear lead. Coming off the turn, Bolt had several meters on the field
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Luzhniki Stadium
Luzhniki Stadium
Luzhniki Stadium
(Russian: стадион «Лужники», IPA: [stədʲɪˈon lʊʐnʲɪˈkʲi]), is the national stadium of Russia, located in its capital, Moscow. Its total seating capacity of 81,000 makes it the largest football stadium in Russia
Russia
and one of the largest stadiums in Europe. The stadium is a part of the Luzhniki Olympic Complex, and is located in Khamovniki District
Khamovniki District
of the Central Administrative Okrug of Moscow
Moscow
city. The name Luzhniki derives from the flood meadows in the bend of Moskva River
Moskva River
where the stadium was built, translating roughly as "The Meadows". Luzhniki was the main stadium of the 1980 Olympic games, hosting the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as some of the competitions, including the final of the football tournament
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4 × 100 Metres Relay
The 4 × 100 metres relay or sprint relay is an athletics track event run in lanes over one lap of the track with four runners completing 100 metres each. The first runners must begin in the same stagger as for the individual 400 m race. A relay baton is carried by each runner. Prior to 2018, the baton had to be passed within a 20 m changeover box, preceded by a 10 metre acceleration zone. With a rule change effective November 1, 2017 that zone was modified to include the acceleration zone as part of the passing zone, making the entire zone 30 metres in length. The outgoing runner cannot touch the baton until it has entered the zone, the incoming runner cannot touch the baton after it has left the zone. The zone is usually marked in yellow, frequently using lines, triangles or chevrons. While the rule book specifies the exact positioning of the marks, the colors and style are only "recommended"
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10000 Metres
The 10,000 metres
10,000 metres
or 10,000-meter run is a common long-distance track running event. The event is part of the athletics programme at the Olympic Games
Olympic Games
and the World Championships in Athletics
World Championships in Athletics
and is common at championship level events. The race consists of 25 laps around an Olympic-sized track. It is less commonly held at track and field meetings, due to its duration. The 10,000 metres
10,000 metres
track race is usually distinguished from its road running counterpart, the 10K run, by its reference to the distance in metres rather than kilometres. The 10,000 metres
10,000 metres
is the longest standard track event. The international distance is equal to approximately 6.2137 miles (or, approximately 32,808.4 feet)
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110 Metres Hurdles
The 110 metres hurdles, or 110-meter hurdles, is a hurdling track and field event for men. It is included in the athletics programme at the Summer Olympic Games. The female counterpart is the 100 metres hurdles. As part of a racing event, ten hurdles of 1.067 metres (3.5 ft or 42 inches) in height are evenly spaced along a straight course of 110 metres. They are positioned so that they will fall over if bumped into by the runner. Fallen hurdles do not carry a fixed time penalty for the runners, but they have a significant pull-over weight which slows down the run. Like the 100 metres sprint, the 110 metres hurdles begins in the starting blocks. For the 110 m hurdles, the first hurdle is placed after a run-up of 13.72 metres (45 ft) from the starting line
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5000 Metres
The 5000 metres
5000 metres
or 5000-meter run (approximately 3.1 mi or 16,404 ft) is a common long-distance running event in track and field. It is one of the track events in the Olympic Games and the World Championships in Athletics, run over 12.5 laps of a standard track. The same distance in road running is called a 5K run. The 5000 m has been present on the Olympic programme since 1912 for men and since 1996 for women. Prior to 1996, women had competed in an Olympic 3000 metres
3000 metres
race since 1984. The 5000 m has been held at each of the World Championships in Athletics
World Championships in Athletics
in men's competition and since 1995 in women's. The event is almost the same length as the dolichos race held at the Ancient Olympic Games, introduced in 720 BCE
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400 Metres Hurdles
The 400 metres
400 metres
hurdles is a track and field hurdling event. The event has been on the Olympic athletics programme since 1900 for men and since 1984 for women. On a standard outdoor track, 400 metres is the length of the inside lane, once around the stadium. Runners stay in their lanes the entire way after starting out of the blocks and must clear ten hurdles that are evenly spaced around the track. The hurdles are positioned and weighted so that they fall forward if bumped into with sufficient force, to prevent injury to the runners. Although there is no longer any penalty for knocking hurdles over, runners prefer to clear them cleanly, as touching them during the race slows runners down. The best male athletes can run the 400 m hurdles in a time of around 47 seconds, while the best female athletes achieve a time of around 53 seconds
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1500 Metres
The 1 500 metres or 1,500-metre run (typically pronounced 'fifteen-hundred metres') is the foremost middle distance track event in athletics. The distance has been contested at the Summer Olympics since 1896 and the World Championships in Athletics
World Championships in Athletics
since 1983. It is equivalent to 1.5 kilometers or approximately ​15⁄16 miles. The demands of the race are similar to that of the 800 metres, but with a slightly higher emphasis on aerobic endurance and a slightly lower sprint speed requirement
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Steeplechase (athletics)
The steeplechase is an obstacle race in athletics, which derives its name from the steeplechase in horse racing. The foremost version of the event is the 3000 metres
3000 metres
steeplechase. The 2000 metres steeplechase is the next most common distance. The 1900 Olympics featured a 2500 metres steeplechase and a 4000 metres steeplechase, and a 2590 metres steeplechase was held at the 1904 Olympics. A 1000 metres steeplechase occasionally used in youth athletics.[1]Contents1 History 2 Format 3 Notes and references 4 External linksHistory[edit] Steeplechase
Steeplechase
race, Celtic Park, N.Y., through waterWomen's steeplechase at the 2008 World Junior Championships, in BydgoszczThe event originated in Ireland.[citation needed] Horses and riders raced from one town's steeple to the next. The steeples were used as markers due to their visibility over long distances
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800 Metres
The 800 metres, or 800 meters (US spelling), is a common track running event. It is the shortest common middle-distance running event. The 800 metres
800 metres
is run over two laps of the track (400 metre track) and has been an Olympic event since the first games in 1896. During indoor track season the event is usually run on a 200-metre track, therefore requiring four laps. The event was derived from the imperial measurement of a half a mile (880 yards), a traditional English racing distance. Imperial racing distances were common in the United States. American high schools (in the name of the NFHS) were the last to convert to metric distances in 1980, following the NCAA's conversion in 1976. Countries associated to the English system converted to metric distances after the 1966 Commonwealth Games. 800 m is 4.67 m less than half a mile. The event combines aerobic endurance with anaerobic conditioning and sprint speed
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100 Metres Hurdles
The 100 metres
100 metres
hurdles, or 100-meter hurdles, is a track and field event run mainly by women (the male counterpart is the 110 metres hurdles). For the race, ten hurdles of a height of 83.8 centimetres (33.0 in) are placed along a straight course of 100 metres (109.36 yd). The first hurdle is placed after a run-up of 13 metres from the starting line. The next 9 hurdles are set at a distance of 8.5 metres from each other, and the home stretch from the last hurdle to the finish line is 10.5 metres long. The hurdles are set up so that they will fall over if bumped into by the runner, but weighted so this is disadvantageous. Fallen hurdles do not count against runners provided that they do not run into them on purpose. Like the 100 metres
100 metres
sprint, the 100 m hurdles begins with athletes in starting blocks. The fastest 100 m hurdlers run the distance in a time of around 12.5 seconds
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400 Metres
The 400 metres, or 400 metre dash, is a sprinting event in track and field competitions. It has been featured in the athletics programme at the Summer Olympics
Summer Olympics
since 1896 for men and since 1964 for women. On a standard outdoor running track, it is one lap around the track. Runners start in staggered positions and race in separate lanes for the entire course. In many countries, athletes previously competed in the 440 yard dash (402.336 m)—which is a quarter of a mile and was referred to as the 'quarter-mile'—instead of the 400 m (437.445 yards), though this distance is now obsolete. Maximum sprint speed capability is a significant contributing factor to success in the event, but athletes also require substantial speed endurance and the ability to cope well with high amounts of lactic acid to sustain a fast speed over a whole lap
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Marathon
The marathon is a long-distance race, completed by running, walking , or a run/walk strategy. There are also wheelchair divisions. The marathon has an official distance of 42.195 kilometres (26.219 miles, or 26 miles 385 yards),[1] usually run as a road race. The event was instituted in commemoration of the fabled run of the Greek soldier Pheidippides, a messenger from the Battle of Marathon
Battle of Marathon
to Athens, who reported the victory. The marathon was one of the original modern Olympic events in 1896, though the distance did not become standardized until 1921
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4 × 400 Metres Relay
The 4 × 400 metres relay or long relay is an athletics track event in which teams consist of four runners who each complete 400 metres or one lap. It is traditionally the final event of a track meet. At top class events, the first 500 metres is run in lanes. Start lines are thus staggered over a greater distance than in an individual 400 metres race; the runners then typically move to the inside of the track. Relay race
Relay race
runners typically carry a relay baton which they must transfer between teammates. Runners have a 20 m box (usually marked with blue lines) in which to transfer the baton. The first transfer is made within the staggered lane lines; for the second and third transfers, runners typically line up across the track despite the fact that runners are usually running in line on the inside of the track. This prevents confusion and collisions during transfer
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100 Metres
The 100 metres, or 100-metre dash, is a sprint race in track and field competitions. The shortest common outdoor running distance, it is one of the most popular and prestigious events in the sport of athletics. It has been contested at the Summer Olympics
Summer Olympics
since 1896 for men and since 1928 for women.Play mediaWomen's 100M Final - 28th Summer Universiade 2015The reigning 100 m Olympic champion is often named "the fastest man in the world". The World Championships 100 metres
100 metres
has been contested since 1983
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Racewalking
Racewalking, or race walking, is a long-distance discipline within the sport of athletics. Although it is a foot race, it is different from running in that one foot must appear to be in contact with the ground at all times. This is assessed by race judges. Typically held on either roads or on running tracks, common distances vary from 3000 metres (1.8 mi) up to 100 kilometres (62.1 mi). There are two racewalking distances contested at the Summer Olympics: the 20 kilometres race walk
20 kilometres race walk
(men and women) and 50 kilometres race walk (men only). Both are held as road events. The biennial IAAF
IAAF
World Championships in Athletics also features these three events, in addition to a 50 km walk for women
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