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2008 Summer Olympics Closing Ceremony Flag Bearers
A CEREMONY (UK : /ˈsɛrɪməni/ , US : /ˈsɛrəˌmoʊni/ ) is an event of ritual significance, performed on a special occasion. The word may be of Etruscan origin, via the Latin caerimonia
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Coronation
A CORONATION is the act of placement or bestowal of a crown upon a monarch's head. The term generally also refers not only to the physical crowning but to the whole ceremony wherein the act of crowning occurs, along with the presentation of other items of regalia , marking the formal investiture of a monarch with regal power. Aside from the crowning, a coronation ceremony may comprise many other rituals such as the taking of special vows by the monarch, the investing and presentation of regalia to the monarch, and acts of homage by the new ruler's subjects and the performance of other ritual deeds of special significance to the particular nation. Western-style coronations have often included anointing the monarch with holy oil , or chrism as it is often called; the anointing ritual's religious significance follows examples found in the Bible
Bible
. The monarch's consort may also be crowned, either simultaneously with the monarch or as a separate event
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Olympic Games Ceremony
OLYMPIC GAMES CEREMONIES of the Ancient Olympic Games
Olympic Games
were an integral part of these Games; the modern Olympic games have opening, closing and medal ceremonies. Some of the elements of the modern ceremonies harken back to the Ancient Games from which the Modern Olympics draw their ancestry. An example of this is the prominence of Greece
Greece
in both the opening and closing ceremonies. During the 2004 Games , the medal winners received a crown of olive branches, which was a direct reference to the Ancient Games, in which the victor's prize was an olive wreath . The various elements of the ceremonies are mandated by the Olympic Charter and cannot be changed by the host nation. Even the artistic portion of the opening and closing ceremonies must meet the approval of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The ceremonies have evolved over the centuries
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Monarch
A MONARCH is a sovereign head of state in a monarchy . A monarch may exercise the highest authority and power in the state , or others may wield that power on behalf of the monarch. Typically a monarch either personally inherits the lawful right to exercise the state's sovereign rights (often referred to as the throne or the crown ) or is selected by an established process from a family or cohort eligible to provide the nation's monarch. Alternatively, an individual may become monarch by conquest, acclamation or a combination of means. A monarch usually reigns for life or until abdication
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Battle
A BATTLE is a combat in warfare between two or more armed forces , or combatants . A war sometimes consists of many battles. Battles generally are well defined in duration, area, and force commitment. A battle with only limited engagement between the forces and without decisive results is sometimes called a skirmish . Wars and military campaigns are guided by strategy , whereas battles take place on a level of planning and execution known as operational mobility . German strategist Carl von Clausewitz
Carl von Clausewitz
stated that "the employment of battles ... to achieve the object of war" was the essence of strategy
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Tea Ceremony
A TEA CEREMONY is a ritualized form of making tea practiced in Asian culture by the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Indian , and Vietnamese . The tea ceremony, literally translated as "way of tea" in Japanese, and "art of tea" in Chinese, is a cultural activity involving the ceremonial preparation and presentation of tea . The Japanese tea ceremony is better known, and was influenced by the Chinese tea culture during ancient and medieval times, starting in the 9th century when tea was first introduced to Japan
Japan
from China. The Vietnamese tea ceremony, also influenced by its Chinese counterpart, is only performed during weddings and other religious rituals. One can also refer to the whole set of rituals, tools, gestures , etc. used in such ceremonies as tea culture
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Calendar Of Saints
The CALENDAR OF SAINTS is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the FEAST DAY or FEAST of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint". The system arose from the early Christian custom of commemorating each martyr annually on the date of his or her death, or birth into heaven, a date therefore referred to in Latin as the martyr's DIES NATALIS ("day of birth"). In the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
, a calendar of saints is called a Menologion . "Menologion" may also mean a set of icons on which saints are depicted in the order of the dates of their feasts, often made in two panels
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Liturgical Year
The LITURGICAL YEAR, also known as the CHURCH YEAR or CHRISTIAN YEAR, as well as the KALENDAR, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in Christian churches that determines when feast days , including celebrations of saints , are to be observed, and which portions of Scripture are to be read either in an annual cycle or in a cycle of several years. Distinct liturgical colours may appear in connection with different seasons of the liturgical year. The dates of the festivals vary somewhat between the different churches, though the sequence and logic is largely the same
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Equinox
An EQUINOX is the moment in which the plane of Earth
Earth
's equator passes through the center of the Sun
Sun
's disk, which occurs twice each year, around 20 March and 23 September. On an equinox, day and night are of approximately equal duration all over the planet. They are not exactly equal, however, due to the angular size of the sun and atmospheric refraction . To avoid this ambiguity, the word equilux is sometimes (but rarely) used to mean a day in which the durations of light and darkness are equal. See Length of equinoctial day and night for further discussion. The word is derived from the Latin aequinoctium, aequus (equal) and nox (genitive noctis) (night)
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Winter Solstice
The WINTER SOLSTICE (or HIBERNAL SOLSTICE), also known as MIDWINTER, is an astronomical phenomenon marking the day with the shortest period of daylight and the longest night of the year. In the Northern Hemisphere this is the December solstice and in the Southern Hemisphere this is the June solstice . The axial tilt of Earth and gyroscopic effects of its daily rotation mean that the two opposite points in the sky to which the Earth's axis of rotation points (axial precession ) change very slowly (making a complete circle approximately every 26,000 years). As the Earth follows its orbit around the Sun, the polar hemisphere that faced away from the Sun, experiencing winter, will, in half a year, face towards the Sun and experience summer. This is because the two hemispheres face opposite directions along Earth's axis, and so as one polar hemisphere experiences winter , the other experiences summer
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Sabbath In Christianity
SABBATH IN CHRISTIANITY is the inclusion or adoption in Christianity of a Sabbath
Sabbath
day. Established within Judaism
Judaism
through Mosaic Law , Christians inherited a Sabbath
Sabbath
practice that reflected two great precepts: the commandment to "remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy " and God's blessing of the seventh day (Saturday) as a day of rest in the Genesis creation narrative
Genesis creation narrative
. The first of these provisions was associated in Judaism
Judaism
with the assembly of the people to worship in the Temple in Jerusalem or in synagogues
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Inauguration
An INAUGURATION is a formal ceremony or special event to mark either: * the beginning of a major public leader's term of office. * the opening or first public use of a new civic area, organisation or project. Such as a museum , hospital or film studio . The term, in a less formal context, can also be used to be refer: * to the beginning or introduction of a new system, policy, or period. * the first, maiden or initial use of something. For example, a ship , railway or even computer service of some kind. CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 Public office * 3 Inaugural address * 4 Official opening * 5 Ceremonial site * 6 Presidential inaugurations * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 External links ETYMOLOGYThe historical source of the word “inauguration” stems from the Latin augur , which refers to the rituals of ancient Roman priests seeking to interpret if it was the will of the gods for a public official to be deemed worthy to assume office
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Theatre
THEATRE or THEATER is a collaborative form of fine art that uses live performers, typically actors or actresses , to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific place, often a stage. The performers may communicate this experience to the audience through combinations of gesture, speech, song, music, and dance. Elements of art, such as painted scenery and stagecraft such as lighting are used to enhance the physicality, presence and immediacy of the experience. The specific place of the performance is also named by the word "theatre" as derived from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
θέατρον (théatron, "a place for viewing"), itself from θεάομαι (theáomai, "to see", "to watch", "to observe"). Modern Western theatre comes, in large measure, from ancient Greek drama , from which it borrows technical terminology, classification into genres, and many of its themes, stock characters , and plot elements
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Dance
DANCE is a performing art form consisting of purposefully selected sequences of human movement . This movement has aesthetic and symbolic value, and is acknowledged as dance by performers and observers within a particular culture . Dance
Dance
can be categorized and described by its choreography , by its repertoire of movements, or by its historical period or place of origin . An important distinction is to be drawn between the contexts of theatrical and participatory dance, although these two categories are not always completely separate; both may have special functions, whether social , ceremonial , competitive , erotic , martial , or sacred /liturgical . Other forms of human movement are sometimes said to have a dance-like quality, including martial arts , gymnastics , cheerleading , figure skating , synchronized swimming , marching bands, and many other forms of athletics
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Groundbreaking
GROUNDBREAKING, also known as CUTTING, SOD-CUTTING, TURNING THE FIRST SOD or a SOD-TURNING CEREMONY, is a traditional ceremony in many cultures that celebrates the first day of construction for a building or other project. Such ceremonies are often attended by dignitaries such as politicians and businessmen . The actual shovel or spade used during the actual groundbreaking is often a special ceremonial shovel meant to be saved for subsequent display. Commemorative information may be subsequently engraved on the shovel. In some places, clergy may also provide blessings , particularly if the building is being constructed by a church or religious-affiliated organization. OTHER USESThe term groundbreaking, when used as an adjective, may mean being or making something that has never been done, seen, or made before; "stylistically innovative works"
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Gift
A GIFT or a PRESENT is an item given to someone without the expectation of payment or return. An item is not a gift, if that item, itself, is already owned by the one to whom it is given. Although gift-giving might involve an expectation of reciprocity, a gift is meant to be free. In many countries, the act of mutually exchanging money , goods , etc. may sustain social relations and contribute to social cohesion. Economists have elaborated the economics of gift-giving into the notion of a gift economy . By extension the term gift can refer to anything that makes the other happier or less sad, especially as a favor, including forgiveness and kindness . Gifts are also first and foremost presented on occasions - birthdays and, in Western cultures, Christmas
Christmas
being the main examples and other occasions like birthdays
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