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2002 OFC Nations Cup
A nation is a stable community of people, formed on the basis of a common language, territory, economic life, ethnicity or psychological make-up manifested in a common culture
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Nation (other)
A nation is a unified social community.Look up nation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Nation or The Nation may also refer to:A country, a division of a geographical territory marked by boundariesContents1 Media 2 People 3 Places 4 Publications 5 Other uses 6 See alsoMedia[edit] Nation (Dr
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Declaration Of Arbroath
The Declaration of Arbroath
Declaration of Arbroath
is a declaration of Scottish independence, made in 1320. It is in the form of a letter in Latin
Latin
submitted to Pope John XXII, dated 6 April 1320, intended to confirm Scotland's status as an independent, sovereign state and defending Scotland's right to use military action when unjustly attacked. Generally believed to have been written in the Arbroath Abbey
Arbroath Abbey
by Bernard of Kilwinning, then Chancellor of Scotland
Scotland
and Abbot of Arbroath,[1] and sealed by fifty-one magnates and nobles, the letter is the sole survivor of three created at the time
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Nation State
A nation state (or nation-state) in the most specific sense is a country where a distinct cultural or ethnic group (a "nation" or "people") inhabits a territory and have formed a state (often a sovereign state) that they predominantly govern. It is a more precise term than "country," but of the same general meaning, being that it is an ethnic nation with its own land (thus "homeland") and government. A nation, in the sense of a common ethnicity, may include a diaspora or refugees who live outside the nation-state; some nations of this sense do not have a state where that ethnicity predominates. In a more general sense, a nation-state is simply a large, politically sovereign country or administrative territory
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City State
A city-state is a sovereign state, also described as a type of small independent country, that usually consists of a single city and its dependent territories. Historically, this included cities such as Rome, Athens, Carthage,[1] and the Italian city-states
Italian city-states
during the Renaissance. As of March 2018 only a handful of sovereign city-states exist, with some disagreement as to which are city-states. A great deal of consensus exists that the term properly applies currently to Singapore, Monaco, and Vatican City. City states are also sometimes called micro-states which however also includes other configurations of very small countries. A number of other small states share similar characteristics, and therefore are sometimes also cited as modern city-states
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Multinational State
A multinational state is a sovereign state that comprises two or more nations. This is in contrast to a nation state, where a single nation accounts for the bulk of the population. Depending on the definition of "nation" (which touches on ethnicity, language, and political identity), a multinational state might also be multicultural or multilingual. Present-day examples of multinational states are Afghanistan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canada, China, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Madagascar, Montenegro, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. Historical multinational states that have since split into multiple sovereign states include Austria-Hungary, British India, Czechoslovakia, the Empire of Japan, the Soviet Union, and Yugoslavia
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Susan Reynolds
Susan Reynolds (born 1929) is a British medieval historian whose book Fiefs and Vassals: the Medieval Evidence Reinterpreted (1994) was part of the attack on the concept of feudalism as classically portrayed by previous historians such as François-Louis Ganshof and Marc Bloch.Contents1 Life 2 Books 3 References 4 Notes 5 External linksLife[edit] She took a first degree at the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
and took her first job as an archivist at the Middlesex County Record Office
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Adrian Hastings
Adrian Hastings (23 June 1929 – 30 May 2001) was a Roman Catholic priest, historian and author. He wrote a book about the "Wiriyamu massacre" during the Mozambican War of Independence.Contents1 Early life 2 Ministry 3 Academic career 4 Marriage 5 Death 6 Works 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Hastings, a grandson of George Woodyatt Hastings, was born in Kuala Lumpur, Malaya, but his mother moved to England to bring up the children when he was little more than a baby. He was educated at Douai School (1943–46) and Worcester College, Oxford
Worcester College, Oxford
(1946–49). In his final year at Oxford, Hastings discerned a missionary vocation
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Alfred The Great
Alfred the Great
Alfred the Great
(Old English: Ælfrēd,[a] Ælfrǣd[b], "elf counsel" or "wise elf"; 849 – 26 October 899) was King of Wessex
King of Wessex
from 871 to 899. Alfred was the youngest son of King Æthelwulf
Æthelwulf
of Wessex. Taking the throne after the death of his brother Æthelred, Alfred spent several years dealing with Viking
Viking
invasions. After a decisive victory in the Battle of Edington
Battle of Edington
in 878 Alfred made an agreement with the Vikings, creating what was known as Danelaw
Danelaw
in the North of England
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Old English
Old English
Old English
(Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon,[2] is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland
Scotland
in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain
Great Britain
by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English
Old English
literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest
Norman conquest
of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French
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Norman Conquest
The Norman conquest of England
England
(in Britain, often called the Norman Conquest or the Conquest) was the 11th-century invasion and occupation of England
England
by an army of Norman, Breton, and French soldiers led by Duke William II of Normandy, later styled William the Conqueror. William's claim to the English throne derived from his familial relationship with the childless Anglo-Saxon King Edward the Confessor, who may have encouraged William's hopes for the throne. Edward died in January 1066 and was succeeded by his brother-in-law Harold Godwinson. The Norwegian king Harald Hardrada
Harald Hardrada
invaded northern England
England
in September 1066 and was victorious at the Battle of Fulford, but Harold defeated and killed him at the Battle of Stamford Bridge
Battle of Stamford Bridge
on 25 September. Within days, William landed in southern England
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Wycliffe's Bible
Wycliffe's Bible
Bible
is the name now given to a group of Bible translations into Middle English
Middle English
that were made under the direction of John Wycliffe. They appeared over a period from approximately 1382 to 1395.[1] These Bible translations
Bible translations
were the chief inspiration and chief cause of the Lollard
Lollard
movement, a pre-Reformation movement that rejected many of the distinctive teachings of the Roman Catholic Church. In the early Middle Ages, most Western Christian people encountered the Bible
Bible
only in the form of oral versions of scriptures, verses and homilies in Latin
Latin
(other sources were mystery plays, usually conducted in the vernacular, and popular iconography)
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English Nationalism
English nationalism
English nationalism
is the nationalism that asserts that the English are a nation and promotes the cultural unity of English people. In a general sense, it comprises political and social movements and sentiment inspired by a love for English culture, language and history, and a sense of pride in England
England
and the English people. English nationalists often see themselves as predominantly English rather than British. On the political level, some English nationalists have advocated self-government for England
England
such as the English Democrats
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Scottish Wars Of Independence
The Wars of Scottish Independence
Wars of Scottish Independence
were a series of military campaigns fought between the Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
and the Kingdom of England
Kingdom of England
in the late 13th and early 14th centuries. The First War (1296–1328) began with the English invasion of Scotland
Scotland
in 1296, and ended with the signing of the Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton in 1328. The Second War (1332–1357) began with the English-supported invasion by Edward Balliol
Edward Balliol
and the "Disinherited" in 1332, and ended in 1357 with the signing of the Treaty of Berwick. The wars were part of a great crisis for Scotland and the period became one of the most defining times in its history. At the end of both wars, Scotland
Scotland
retained its status as an independent state
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Sovereign State
A sovereign state is, in international law, a nonphysical juridical entity that is represented by one centralized government that has sovereignty over a geographic area
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Robert The Bruce
In office 1298–1300 Serving with John III Comyn and William de Lamberton
William de Lamberton
(from 1301)Preceded by William WallaceSucceeded by Ingram de UmfravilleStatue of Robert the Bruce
Robert the Bruce
at the Bannockburn battle fieldRobert I (11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), popularly known as Robert the Bruce
Robert the Bruce
(Medieval Gaelic: Roibert a Briuis; modern Scottish Gaelic: Raibeart Bruis; Norman French: Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys; Early Scots: Robert Brus; Latin: Robertus Brussius), was King of Scots from 1306 until his death in 1329. Robert was one of the most famous warriors of his generation, and eventually led Scotland during the First War of Scottish Independence
First War of Scottish Independence
against England
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