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2001 In Poetry
Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).List of years in poetry (table)... 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 ...1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004..
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Irish Poetry
Irish poetry
Irish poetry
includes poetry in two languages, Irish and English. The complex interplay between these two traditions, and between both of them and other poetries in English and Scottish Gaelic, has produced a body of work that is both rich in variety and difficult to categorise. The earliest surviving poems in Irish date back to the 6th century, while the first known poems in English from Ireland date to the 14th century. Although there has always been some cross-fertilization between the two language traditions, an English-language poetry that had absorbed themes and models from Irish did not finally emerge until the 19th century
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Amiri Baraka
Amiri Baraka
Amiri Baraka
(born Everett LeRoi Jones; October 7, 1934 – January 9, 2014), previously known as LeRoi Jones
LeRoi Jones
and Imamu Amear Baraka,[1] was an African-American
African-American
writer of poetry, drama, fiction, essays and music criticism. He was the author of numerous books of poetry and taught at several universities, including the State University of New York at Buffalo and the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He received the PEN/Beyond Margins Award, in 2008 for Tales of the Out and the Gone.[7] Baraka's career spanned nearly 50 years, and his themes range from black liberation to white racism
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2001 In Archaeology
Contents1 Excavations 2 Explorations 3 Publications 4 Finds 5 Events 6 Deaths 7 ReferencesExcavations[edit]March 8–May 28: Recovery of the major portions of the 1967 wreck of hydroplane Bluebird K7
Bluebird K7
and of the body of its driver Donald Campbell from Coniston Water
Coniston Water
in the Lake District
Lake District
of England Grinnell College
Grinnell College
project at Mayapan Excavations at Cival
Cival
directed by Dr
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2001 In Architecture
Buildings and structuresArt Archaeology Architecture Literature Music Philosophy Science +...The year 2001 in architecture
2001 in architecture
involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.Contents1 Events 2 Buildings opened 3 Buildings completed 4 Awards 5 Deaths 6 See also 7 ReferencesEvents[edit] September 11 September 11 attacks: World Trade Center in New York (designed by Minoru Yamasaki) is destroyed, and The Pentagon
The Pentagon
is heavily damaged by hijacked airliners. St
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2001 In Music
NorwaySouth KoreaBy genrecountryheavy metal hip hop jazzLatinBy topicList of albums releasedList of years in music (table)... 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 ...1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004..
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2001 In Philosophy
2001 in philosophyContents1 Events 2 Publications2.1 Introductory Books3 Deaths 4 ReferencesEvents[edit] Saul Kripke
Saul Kripke
was awarded the Rolf Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy "for his creation of the modal-logical semantics that bear his name and for his associated original and profound investigations of identity, reference and necessity".[1]Publications[edit]Christopher Hitchens, Letters to a Young Contrarian
Letters to a Young Contrarian
(2001) Alain Finkielkraut, The Internet, The Troubling Ecstasy (2001) John A. Leslie, Infinite Minds: A Philosophical Cosmology (2001) Mario Bunge, Philosophy in Crisis: The Need for Reconstruction (2001)Introductory Books[edit]Michael Williams, Problems Of Knowledge: A Critical Introduction to Epistemology (2001)Deaths[edit]January 5 - G. E. M. Anscombe
G. E. M. Anscombe
(born 1919) February 9 - Herbert A. Simon
Herbert A

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2001 In Science
The year 2001 in science and technology involved many events, some of which are included below.Contents1 Astronomy and space exploration 2 Biology 3 Chemistry 4 Computer science 5 Medicine 6 Paleontology 7 Philosophy 8 Awards 9 Deaths 10 ReferencesAstronomy and space exploration[edit]February 12 – The NEAR Shoemaker
NEAR Shoemaker
spacecraft lands in the "saddle" region of 433 Eros, becoming the first s
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September 11 Attacks
The September 11 attacks (also referred to as 9/11)[a] were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda on the United States
United States
on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001. The attacks killed 2,996 people, injured over 6,000 others, and caused at least $10 billion in infrastructure and property damage.[2][3] Four passenger airliners operated by two major U.S. passenger air carriers ( United Airlines
United Airlines
and American Airlines) – all of which departed from airports in the northeastern United States
United States
bound for California – were hijacked by 19 al-Qaeda terrorists
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W. H. Auden
Wystan Hugh Auden[1] (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) was an English-American poet. Auden's poetry was noted for its stylistic and technical achievement, its engagement with politics, morals, love, and religion, and its variety in tone, form and content. He is best known for love poems such as "Funeral Blues", poems on political and social themes such as "September 1, 1939" and "The Shield of Achilles", poems on cultural and psychological themes such as The Age of Anxiety, and poems on religious themes such as "For the Time Being" and "Horae Canonicae."[2][3][4] He was born in York, grew up in and near Birmingham
Birmingham
in a professional middle-class family. He attended English independent (or public) schools and studied English at Christ Church, Oxford
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National Public Radio
National Public Radio
Radio
(usually shortened to NPR, stylized as npr) is an American privately and publicly funded non-profit membership media organization based in Washington DC. It serves as a national syndicator to a network of over 1,000 public radio stations in the United States.[2] NPR
NPR
produces and distributes news and cultural programming. Individual public radio stations are not required to broadcast all NPR
NPR
programs; most broadcast a mix of NPR
NPR
programs, content from rival providers American Public Media, Public Radio
Radio
International, Public Radio Exchange and WNYC
WNYC
Studios, and locally produced programs
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New Jersey
New Jersey
Jersey
is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the Northeastern United States. It is a peninsula, bordered on the north and east by the state of New York; on the east, southeast, and south by the Atlantic Ocean; on the west by the Delaware River
Delaware River
and Pennsylvania; and on the southwest by the Delaware Bay
Delaware Bay
and Delaware. New Jersey
Jersey
is the fourth-smallest state by area but the 11th-most populous, with 9 million residents as of 2017,[20] and the most densely populated of the 50 U.S. states
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French Poetry
French and Francophone literatureFrench literature By category French languageFrench literary historyMedieval 16th century • 17th century 18th century • 19th century 20th century • ContemporaryFrancophone literatureFrancophone literature Literature of Quebec Postcolonial literature Literature of HaitiFrench-language authorsChronological listFrench writersWriters • Novelists Playwrights • Poets Essayists Short story writersFormsNovel • Poetry
Poetry

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John Milton
John Milton
John Milton
(9 December 1608 – 8 November 1674) was an English poet, polemicist, man of letters, and civil servant for the Commonwealth of England
Commonwealth of England
under Oliver Cromwell. He wrote at a time of religious flux and political upheaval, and is best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost
Paradise Lost
(1667), written in blank verse. Milton's poetry and prose reflect deep personal convictions, a passion for freedom and self-determination, and the urgent issues and political turbulence of his day
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Paradise Lost
Paradise Lost
Paradise Lost
is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton
John Milton
(1608–1674). The first version, published in 1667, consisted of ten books with over ten thousand lines of verse. A second edition followed in 1674, arranged into twelve books (in the manner of Virgil's Aeneid) with minor revisions throughout and a note on the versification.[1][2] It is considered by critics to be Milton's major work, and it helped solidify his reputation as one of the greatest English poets of his time.[3] The poem concerns the biblical story of the Fall of Man: the temptation of Adam and Eve
Adam and Eve
by the fallen angel Satan
Satan
and their expulsion from the Garden of Eden
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Norwich, Connecticut
Norwich, known as 'The Rose of New England', is a city in New London County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 40,493 at the 2010 United States Census
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