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2-Butanol
sec-Butyl alcohol, 2- Butanol
Butanol
2-Butyl alcohol IDENTIFIERS CAS Number * 78-92-2 Y * 14898-79-4 (R) Y * 4221-99-2 (S) Y 3D model ( JSmol
JSmol
) * Interactive image Beilstein Reference 7736491718764 (R) 1718763 (S)
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Safety Data Sheet
A SAFETY DATA SHEET (SDS), MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET (MSDS), or PRODUCT SAFETY DATA SHEET (PSDS) is an important component of product stewardship , occupational safety and health , and spill-handling procedures. SDS formats can vary from source to source within a country depending on national requirements. SDSs are a widely used system for cataloging information on chemicals , chemical compounds , and chemical mixtures . SDS information may include instructions for the safe use and potential hazards associated with a particular material or product. The SDS should be available for reference in the area where the chemicals are being stored or in use. There is also a duty to properly label substances on the basis of physico-chemical, health or environmental risk. Labels can include hazard symbols such as the European Union standard symbols
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GHS Hazard Pictograms
HAZARD PICTOGRAMS form part of the international Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). Two sets of pictograms are included within the GHS: one for the labelling of containers and for workplace hazard warnings, and a second for use during the transport of dangerous goods. Either one or the other is chosen, depending on the target audience, but the two are not used together. The two sets of pictograms use the same symbols for the same hazards, although certain symbols are not required for transport pictograms. Transport pictograms come in wider variety of colors and may contain additional information such as a subcategory number
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Globally Harmonized System Of Classification And Labelling Of Chemicals
The GLOBALLY HARMONIZED SYSTEM OF CLASSIFICATION AND LABELLING OF CHEMICALS (GHS) is an internationally agreed-upon system, created by the United Nations
United Nations
beginning in 1992 and as of 2017 is not yet fully implemented in many countries. It was designed to replace the various classification and labelling standards used in different countries by using consistent criteria on a global level. It supersedes the relevant system of the European Union
European Union
, which has implemented the United Nations' GHS into EU law as the CLP Regulation and United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards
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GHS Hazard Statement
HAZARD STATEMENTS form part of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). They are intended to form a set of standardized phrases about the hazards of chemical substances and mixtures that can be translated into different languages. As such, they serve the same purpose as the well-known R-phrases , which they are intended to replace. Hazard statements are one of the key elements for the labelling of containers under the GHS, along with: * an identification of the product * one or more hazard pictograms (where necessary) * a signal word – either DANGER or WARNING – where necessary * precautionary statements , indicating how the product should be handled to minimize risks to the user (as well as to other people and the general environment) * the identity of the supplier (who might be a manufacturer or importer).Each hazard statement is designated a code, starting with the letter H and followed by three digits
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Standard Enthalpy Change Of Combustion
The calorific value is the total energy released as heat when a substance undergoes complete combustion with oxygen under standard conditions . The chemical reaction is typically a hydrocarbon or other organic molecule reacting with oxygen to form carbon dioxide and water and release heat. It may be expressed with the quantities: * energy/mole of fuel (kJ/mol ) * energy/mass of fuel * energy/volume of the fuelThe calorific value is conventionally measured with a bomb calorimeter . It may also be calculated as the difference between the heat of formation ΔHo f of the products and reactants (though this approach is purely empirical since most heats of formation are calculated from measured heats of combustion). For a fuel of composition CcHhOoNn, the magnitude of the heat of combustion is 418 kJ/mol (c + 0.3 h – 0.5 o) to a good approximation (±3%)
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Standard Enthalpy Change Of Formation
The STANDARD ENTHALPY OF FORMATION or STANDARD HEAT OF FORMATION of a compound is the change of enthalpy during the formation of 1 mole of the substance from its constituent elements , with all substances in their standard states , and at a pressure of 1 bar (100 kPa). There is no standard temperature. Its symbol is ΔfH⊖. The superscript Plimsoll on this symbol indicates that the process has occurred under standard conditions at the specified temperature (usually 25 °C or 298.15 K)
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Magnetic Susceptibility
In electromagnetism , the MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ( Latin
Latin
: susceptibilis, "receptive"; denoted χ ) is one measure of the magnetic properties of a material. The susceptibility indicates whether a material is attracted into or repelled out of a magnetic field, which in turn has implications for practical applications. Quantitative measures of the magnetic susceptibility also provide insights into the structure of materials, providing insight into bonding and energy levels. Mathematically it is the ratio of magnetization I (magnetic moment per unit volume) to the applied magnetizing field intensity H
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Chemical Nomenclature
A CHEMICAL NOMENCLATURE is a set of rules to generate systematic names for chemical compounds . The nomenclature used most frequently worldwide is the one created and developed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). The IUPAC's rules for naming organic and inorganic compounds are contained in two publications, known as the Blue Book
Book
and the Red Book
Book
, respectively. A third publication, known as the Green Book
Book
, describes the recommendations for the use of symbols for physical quantities (in association with the IUPAP ), while a fourth, the Gold Book
Book
, contains the definitions of a large number of technical terms used in chemistry
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Specific Heat Capacity
HEAT CAPACITY or THERMAL CAPACITY is a measurable physical quantity equal to the ratio of the heat added to (or removed from) an object to the resulting temperature change. The unit of heat capacity is joule per kelvin J K {displaystyle mathrm {tfrac {J}{K}} } , or kilogram metre squared per kelvin second squared k g m 2 K s 2 {displaystyle mathrm {tfrac {kgcdot m^{2}}{Kcdot s^{2}}} } in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI ). The dimensional form is L2MT−2Θ−1. Specific heat is the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of one kilogram of mass by 1 kelvin. Heat
Heat
capacity is an extensive property of matter, meaning that it is proportional to the size of the system
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Standard Molar Entropy
In chemistry , the STANDARD MOLAR ENTROPY is the entropy content of one mole of substance under a standard state (not STP ). The standard molar entropy is usually given the symbol S°, and as units of joules per mole kelvin (J mol−1 K−1). Unlike standard enthalpies of formation , the value of S° is absolute. That is, an element in its standard state has a definite, nonzero value of S at room temperature. The entropy of a pure crystalline structure can be 0 J mol−1 K−1 only at 0 K, according to the third law of thermodynamics . However, this presupposes that the material forms a 'perfect crystal ' without any frozen in entropy (defects, dislocations), which is never completely true because crystals always grow at a finite temperature. However this residual entropy is often quite negligible
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GHS Precautionary Statements
PRECAUTIONARY STATEMENTS form part of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). They are intended to form a set of standardized phrases giving advice about the correct handling of chemical substances and mixtures, which can be translated into different languages. As such, they serve the same purpose as the well-known S-phrases , which they are intended to replace. Precautionary statements are one of the key elements for the labelling of containers under the GHS, along with: * an identification of the product; * one or more hazard pictograms (where necessary) * a signal word – either DANGER or WARNING – where necessary * hazard statements , indicating the nature and degree of the risks posed by the product * the identity of the supplier (who might be a manufacturer or importer)Each precautionary statement is designated a code, starting with the letter P and followed by three digits
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NFPA 704
"NFPA 704: STANDARD SYSTEM FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE HAZARDS OF MATERIALS FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE" is a standard maintained by the U.S. -based National Fire Protection Association . First "tentatively adopted as a guide" in 1960, and revised several times since then, it defines the colloquial "FIRE DIAMOND" used by emergency personnel to quickly and easily identify the risks posed by hazardous materials. This helps determine what, if any, special equipment should be used, procedures followed, or precautions taken during the initial stages of an emergency response. CONTENTS * 1 Codes * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 External links CODESThe four divisions are typically color-coded with red indicating flammability , blue indicating level of health hazard, yellow for chemical reactivity , and white containing codes for special hazards. Each of health, flammability and reactivity is rated on a scale from 0 (no hazard) to 4 (severe risk)
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Butanone
BUTANONE, also known as METHYL ETHYL KETONE (MEK), is an organic compound with the formula CH3C(O)CH2CH3. This colorless liquid ketone has a sharp, sweet odor reminiscent of butterscotch and acetone . It is produced industrially on a large scale, and also occurs in trace amounts in nature. It is soluble in water and is commonly used as an industrial solvent. CONTENTS * 1 Production * 2 Applications * 2.1 As a solvent * 2.2 As a plastic welding agent * 2.3 Other uses * 3 Safety * 3.1 Flammability * 3.2 Health effects * 3.3 Regulation * 4 See also * 5 Notes * 6 References * 7 External links PRODUCTION Butanone
Butanone
may be produced by oxidation of 2-butanol
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Standard State
In chemistry , the STANDARD STATE of a material (pure substance , mixture or solution ) is a reference point used to calculate its properties under different conditions. In principle, the choice of standard state is arbitrary, although the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
Chemistry
(IUPAC) recommends a conventional set of standard states for general use. IUPAC
IUPAC
recommends using a standard pressure po = 105 Pa . Strictly speaking, temperature is not part of the definition of a standard state. For example, as discussed below, the standard state of a gas is conventionally chosen to be unit pressure (usually in bar) ideal gas , regardless of the temperature. However, most tables of thermodynamic quantities are compiled at specific temperatures, most commonly 298.15 K (25.00 °C; 77.00 °F) or, somewhat less commonly, 273.15 K (0.00 °C; 32.00 °F)
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Organic Compound
An ORGANIC COMPOUND is virtually any chemical compound that contains carbon , although a consensus definition remains elusive and likely arbitrary. Organic compounds are rare terrestrially, but of central importance because all known life is based on organic compounds. The most basic petrochemicals are considered the building blocks of organic chemistry
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