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1989 Sudanese Coup D'état
Sudanese
Sudanese
or Sudanic may refer to:pertaining to the country of Sudan the people of Sudan, see Demographics of Sudan pertaining to Sudan
Sudan
(region) Sudanic languages Sudanic race, subtype of the Africoid
Africoid
racial category See also[edit] Sundanese (other) .mw-parser-output table.dmbox clear:both;margin:0.9em 1em;border-top:1px solid #ccc;border-bottom:1px solid #ccc;background-color:transparent Disambiguation page providing links to topics that could be referred to by the same search termThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Sudanese
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1966 Ghanaian Coup D'état
The National Liberation Council
National Liberation Council
(NLC) led the Ghanaian government from 24 February 1966 to 1 October 1969. The body emerged from a violent coup d'état (Ghana's first) against the civilian government led by Kwame Nkrumah. The Ghana
Ghana
Police Service and Ghana
Ghana
Armed Forces carried out the coup jointly, with collaboration from the Ghana
Ghana
Civil Service. It is alleged that the plotters were well connected with the governments of Britain (under PM Harold Wilson) and the United States (then under Lyndon B
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Sadiq Al-Mahdi
Sadiq al- Mahdi
Mahdi
(Arabic: الصادق المهدي‎) (also known as Sadiq Al Siddiq, born December 25, 1935)[1] is a Sudanese political and religious figure who was Prime Minister of Sudan
Sudan
from 1966 to 1967 and again from 1986 to 1989
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Military Junta
A military dictatorship (also known as a military junta) is a form of government different from civilian dictatorship for a number of reasons: their motivations for seizing power, the institutions through which they organize their rule and the ways in which they leave power. Often viewing itself as saving the nation from the corrupt or myopic civilian politicians, a military dictatorship justifies its position as "neutral" arbiters on the basis of their membership within the armed forces. For example, many juntas adopt titles, such as "National Redemption Council", "Committee of National Restoration", or "National Liberation Committee"
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Gaafar Al-Nimeiry
Gaafar Muhammad an-Nimeiry (otherwise spelled in English as Jaafar Nimeiry, Gaafar Nimeiry
Gaafar Nimeiry
or Ga'far Muhammad Numayri; Arabic: جعفر محمد نميري‎; 1 January 1930[2] – 30 May 2009[3]) was the President of Sudan
Sudan
from 1969 to 1985. A military officer, he came to power after a military coup in 1969. With his party, the Sudanese Socialist
Socialist
Union, he initially pursued socialist and Pan-Arabist policies. In 1972 he signed the Addis Ababa Agreement, ending the First Sudanese Civil War. He later became an ally of the United States.[3] In the late 1970s he moved towards Islamism, and in 1983 he imposed Sharia
Sharia
law throughout the country, precipitating the Second Sudanese Civil War. He was ousted from power in 1985 and went into exile in Egypt
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Second Sudanese Civil War
Stalemate[4]Comprehensive Peace Agreement Eastern Sudan
Sudan
Peace Agreement Independence of the Republic of South Sudan
Republic of South Sudan
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National Redemption Council
The National Redemption Council
National Redemption Council
(NRC) was the ruling Ghana
Ghana
military government from 13 January 1972 to 9 October 1975. Its chairman was Colonel
Colonel
I. K. Acheampong, who was thus also the Head of state of Ghana.Contents1 Duration of rule 2 Members of the NRC2.1 List of members 2.2 List of commissioners in NRC government3 Some programmes of the NRC 4 Notes 5 Sources and external linksDuration of rule[edit] The NRC came into power through a coup d'état led by Colonel Acheampong. This was a bloodless coup that overthrew the democratically elected Progress Party (PP) government of Dr. K. A. Busia, taking place while Dr. Busia was in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
for medical reasons. The constitution was suspended and all political parties banned
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Supreme Military Council (Ghana)
The Supreme Military Council (SMC) was the ruling government of Ghana from October 9, 1975 to June 4, 1979. Its chairman was Colonel I.K. Acheampong. He was also the Head of state of Ghana
Ghana
due to his chairmanship.Contents1 SMC I and II 2 Members of the Acheampong government2.1 SMC I members (October 1975 to July 1978) 2.2 List of commissioners (NRC members) 2.3 Regional Commissioners3 Palace coup3.1 SMC II members (July 1978 to June 1979)4 References 5 Sources 6 External sourcesSMC I and II[edit] The period of the SMC can be divided into two eras. These are :Acheampong era - SMC - 1 (October 9, 1975 - July 5, 1978) Akuffo era - SMC 2 - (July 5, 1978 - June 4, 1979)The SMC was overthrown by the Armed Forces Revolutionary Council on June 4, 1979
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National Islamic Front
The National Islamic Front (Arabic: الجبهة الإسلامية القومية‎; transliterated: al-Jabhah al-Islamiyah al-Qawmiyah) was an Islamist
Islamist
political organization founded in 1976[1] and led by Dr. Hassan al-Turabi
Hassan al-Turabi
that influenced the Sudanese government starting in 1979, and dominated it from 1989 to the late 1990s. It was one of only two Islamic revival movements to secure political power in the 20th century (the other being the followers of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in the Islamic Republic of Iran).[2] The NIF emerged from Muslim student groups that first began organizing in the universities during the 1940s, and its main support base has remained the college educated.[2] It supported the maintenance of an Islamic state
Islamic state
run on sharia and rejected the concept of a secular state
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Sudanese Armed Forces
Military history of SudanFirst Sudanese Civil War Second Sudanese Civil War War in Darfur Battle of Malakal Sudan–SPLM-N War Heglig Crisis Intervention to YemenRanks Rank insigniaThe Sudanese Armed Forces
Armed Forces
(SAF; Arabic: القوات المسلحة السودانية‎) are the Armed Forces
Armed Forces
of the Republic of Sudan. According to 2011 IISS
IISS
estimates, it numbers 109,300 personnel. They comprises Land Forces, the Sudanese Navy, the Sudanese Air Force, and the Popular Defence Forces. They also previously had Joint Integrated Units formed together with its rebel enemies the Sudan
Sudan
People's Liberation Army
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1972 Moroccan Coup Attempt
The 1972 Moroccan coup attempt
1972 Moroccan coup attempt
was an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate King Hassan II of Morocco
Hassan II of Morocco
on 16 August 1972. The attempted coup d'état occurred in Morocco
Morocco
when a rebel faction within the Moroccan military attempted to shoot down an aircraft carrying the Moroccan king, Hassan II. The attempt was orchestrated by General Mohamed Oufkir, a close advisor to King Hassan
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1969 Somali Coup D'état
The 1969 Somali coup d'état was the bloodless takeover of Somalia's government on 21 October 1969 by left-wing military officers of the Supreme Revolutionary Council led by Siad Barre. Somali troops supported by tanks under the command of Barre stormed Mogadishu and seized key government buildings and ordered the abdication of the country's leaders
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1971 Ugandan Coup D'état
The 1971 Ugandan coup d'état was a military coup d'état executed by the Ugandan military, led by general Idi Amin, against the government of President Milton Obote on January 25, 1971. The seizure of power took place while Obote was abroad attending the Commonwealth Heads of State conference in Singapore.[1] Amin was afraid that Obote might dismiss him. The 1971 coup is often cited as an example of "class action by the military", wherein the Ugandan armed forces acted against "an increasingly socialist régime whose equalitarian domestic politics posed more and more of a threat to the military's economic privileges".[2] Portrayal in media[edit]The film Rise and Fall of Idi Amin opens with the coup occurring while Dr. Michael Oloya (Thomas Baptiste) is performing surgery, and is portrayed as violent
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1969 Sudanese Coup D'état
Col. Gaafar Nimeiry Coup Military Leader Babiker Awadalla Coup Civilian Leader Faruq Hamadallah Free Officers Member Ma'mun Awad Abu Zaid Free Officers Member Khalid Hassan Abbas Free Officers Member Abu al-Qasim Muhammad Ibrahim Free Officers Member Zain al-Abdin Abd al-Qadir Free Officers MemberLocation within Sudan.The 1969 Sudanese coup d'état was a successful coup, led by Col. Gaafar Nimeiry, against the government of President Ismail al-Azhari. The coup signaled the end of Sudan's second democratic era, and saw the beginning of Nimeiry's 16 year rule. Nimeiry's government would pursue a radical Arab nationalist and leftist program, bringing in a socialist program for social and economic development, including widespread nationalization of private property. His government would also push for an end to the First Sudanese Civil War, which by 1969 had been ongoing for nearly 14 years
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1968 Republic Of The Congo Coup D'état
Coup succeedsAlphonse Massamba-Débat oustedBelligerents Government of Republic of the Congo Army factionOn September 4, 1968, following several days of violent clashes, Alphonse Massamba-Débat's government was overthrown by the military who forced Massamba-Débat to resign.[1][2] Alfred Raoul then became the acting head of state until January 1969 when Marien Ngouabi, the chairman of the same party that had brought Massamba-Débat to power, assumed control.[3] References[edit]^ Lentz, Harris M. (2013). Heads of States and Governments Since 1945 (3rd Edition). Routledge. p. 192. ISBN 1-884964-44-3.  ^ Gleijeses, Piero (2002). Conflicting Missions: Havana, Washington, and Africa, 1959-1976. University of North Carolina Press. p. 183
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1971 Moroccan Coup Attempt
The 1971 Moroccan coup attempt or the Skhirat
Skhirat
coup d'état (Arabic: محاولة انقلاب الصخيرات, Skhirat
Skhirat
attempted coup d'état) was an unsuccessful attempt by rebel military leaders to assassinate King Hassan II of Morocco
Hassan II of Morocco
on 10 July 1971, the day of his forty-second birthday. It was the first of half a dozen other attempted coup d'état during the king's regime. Lieutenant-colonel M'hamed Ababou
M'hamed Ababou
with, and under the orders of General Mohamed Medbouh, were the main instigators of the attack on Hassan II's summer palace in Skhirat
Skhirat
on the Atlantic coast, about 20 kilometres (12 mi) south of Rabat, and ordered the seizing of several key places in Rabat
Rabat
in order to establish a republic
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