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1922 Michigan Wolverines Football Team
The 1922 Michigan Wolverines football
Michigan Wolverines football
team represented the University of Michigan
Michigan
in the 1922 Big Ten Conference
Big Ten Conference
football season. In Fielding H. Yost's 22nd season as head coach, Michigan
Michigan
compiled a record of 6–0–1 (4–0 in Big Ten Conference
Big Ten Conference
games), outscored opponents 183–13, and tied with Iowa for the Big Ten championship. On defense, the team did not allow its opponents to score a point in the first five games of the season, and its scoring defense of 1.85 points per game is among the lowest in Michigan
Michigan
football history. Highlights of the 1922 season included participation in dedication games for Vanderbilt University's Dudley Field, the first large athletic stadium in the South, and Ohio State University's Ohio Stadium
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Michigan Wolverines Football
The Michigan Wolverines
Michigan Wolverines
football program represents the University of Michigan in college football at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A) level. Michigan has the most all-time wins in college football history and the highest winning percentage among FBS teams.[4] The team is known for its distinctive winged helmet, its fight song, its record-breaking attendance figures at Michigan Stadium,[5] and its many rivalries, particularly its annual, regular-season-ending game against Ohio State, once voted as ESPN's best sports rivalry.[6] Michigan began competing in intercollegiate football in 1879
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Minneapolis
US: 46th MN: 1st • Density 7,660/sq mi (2,959/km2) • Metro 3,551,036 (US: 16th)[1] • CSA 4,197,883 (US: 14th)Demonym(s) MinneapolitanTime zone CST (UTC–6) • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC–5)ZIP Codes 55401–55488 (range includes some ZIP Codes for Minneapolis
Minneapolis
suburbs)Area code(s) 612FIPS code 27-43000GNIS feature ID 0655030[4]Website www.minneapolismn.gov
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Case Scientists Football
The Case Western Reserve Spartans football team is the varsity intercollegiate football team representing the Case Western Reserve University, located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States. They compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division III level and hold dual membership in both the Presidents' Athletic Conference (PAC) and the University Athletic Association (UAA). They are coached by Greg Debeljak
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Ann Arbor, Michigan
Ann Arbor is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Michigan
Michigan
and the county seat of Washtenaw County.[5] The 2010 census recorded its population to be 113,934, making it the sixth largest city in Michigan.[6] Ann Arbor is home to the University of Michigan. The university shapes Ann Arbor's economy significantly as it employs about 30,000 workers, including about 12,000 in the medical center. The city's economy is also centered on high technology, with several companies drawn to the area by the university's research and development infrastructure, and by its graduates.[7] Ann Arbor was founded in 1824, named for wives of the village's founders, both named Ann, and the stands of bur oak trees.[8] The University of Michigan
Michigan
moved from Detroit
Detroit
to Ann Arbor in 1837, and the city grew at a rapid rate in the early to mid-20th century
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1922 Vanderbilt Commodores Football Team
The 1922 Vanderbilt Commodores football team represented Vanderbilt University during the 1922 Southern Conference football season. During the season, Dan McGugin's 18th as head coach,[n 1] Vanderbilt compiled a record of 8–0–1 (5–0 in conference games)[n 2] and outscored its opponents 177 to 16. The Commodores' defense was unrivaled in the South, leading the nation in giving up just 1.8 points per game, none of them at home. The season was immediately dubbed one of the best in Vanderbilt and Southern football history.[3][4] It was also the Commodores' first year in the newly formed Southern Conference (SoCon), in which the team tied with North Carolina and Georgia Tech for the conference championship. This was Vanderbilt's second consecutive year as leader of its conference, having tied with Georgia, Centre, and Georgia Tech for the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAA) title in 1921
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Nashville, Tennessee
Nashville
Nashville
(/ˈnæʃvɪl/[6]) is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Tennessee
Tennessee
and the seat of Davidson County.[7] It is located on the Cumberland River
Cumberland River
in northern Middle Tennessee. The city is a center for the music,[8] healthcare, publishing, private prison,[9] banking and transportation industries, and is home to numerous colleges and universities. Since 1963, Nashville
Nashville
has had a consolidated city-county government, which includes six smaller municipalities in a two-tier system. The city is governed by a mayor, a vice-mayor, and a 40-member Metropolitan Council; 35 of the members are elected from single-member districts, while the other five are elected at-large
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Columbus, Ohio
Columbus (/kəˈlʌmbəs/ kə-LUM-bəs) is the state capital and the most populous city in Ohio. It is the 14th-most populous city in the United States,[17][18][19][20] with a population of 860,090 as of 2016 estimates.[13][21] This makes Columbus the 3rd-most populous state capital in the United States
United States
after Phoenix, Arizona
Phoenix, Arizona
and Austin, Texas, and the second-most populous city in the Midwestern United States, after Chicago.[13][22] It is the core city of the Columbus, Ohio, Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses ten counties.[23] With a population of 2,078,725, it is Ohio's second-largest metropolitan area. Columbus is the county seat of Franklin County.[24] The municipality has also expanded and annexed portions of adjoining Delaware
Delaware
County, Pickaway County and Fairfield County
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Michigan–Ohio State Football Rivalry
The Michigan–Ohio State football rivalry, referred to as The Game by some followers,[1][6][7] is an American college football rivalry game played annually between the University of Michigan
University of Michigan
Wolverines and the Ohio State University
Ohio State University
Buckeyes. It gathered particular national interest as most of the games from the 1970s through the mid-2000s determined the Big Ten Conference
Big Ten Conference
title and the resulting Rose Bowl Game match ups, and many influenced the outcome of the national college football championship. The game was ranked by ESPN
ESPN
in 2000 as the greatest North American sports rivalry.[8] The two Midwest state schools first met in 1897, and the rivalry has been played annually since 1918. The game has been played at the end of the regular season since 1935 (with exceptions in 1942, 1986, and 1998)
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Illinois-Michigan Football Series
The Illinois–Michigan football series is an American college football series between the Illinois Fighting Illini and Michigan Wolverines. The series dates back to 1898 and features two long-time Big Ten members, with Illinois claiming five national championships, 15 Big Ten Conference titles, and 24 consensus All-Americans, and Michigan claiming 11 national championships, 42 Big Ten titles, and 81 consensus All-Americans. Michigan leads the series 70–23–2.[1] For Illinois, Michigan is its third-most played opponent, trailing only Northwestern (108 games) and Ohio State (101 games)
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1922 Michigan Agricultural Aggies Football Team
The 1922 Michigan Agricultural Aggies football team represented Michigan Agricultural College (MAC) in the 1922 college football season. In their second and final year under head coach Albert Barron, the Aggies compiled a 3–5–2 record and were outscored by their opponents 135 to 111.[1] Game summaries[edit] Michigan[edit]Week 5: Michigan Agricultural at Michigan1 2 3 4 TotalMichigan Agricultural 0 0 0 0 0• Michigan 14 19 9 21 63Date: November 4, 1922 Location: Ferry Field Ann Arbor, MI Game attendance: 25,000 Referee: Ray (Illinois)On November 4, 1922, the Aggies lost to Michigan, 63–0. Lloyd Northard wrote in the Detroit Free Press that "not in the past 10 years has an Aggie team been so utterly out-classed in every department of the game."[2] Fully embracing the passing game, Michigan threw 33 passes with 17 completions
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Michigan–Michigan State Football Rivalry
The Michigan– Michigan
Michigan
State football rivalry is an American college football rivalry between the University of Michigan
University of Michigan
Wolverines and Michigan State University
Michigan State University
Spartans. The winner of each year's game receives the Paul Bunyan
Paul Bunyan
Trophy
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Northrop Field
Northrop Field was the on-campus stadium of the Minnesota Golden Gophers football team from 1899 to 1923. The original field had seating of around 3,000 and was named for University President Cyrus Northrop. After the 1902 season, the playing field was moved and new seating was added that allowed for crowds of up to 20,000. The stadium was sometimes referred to as Greater Northrop Field after 1902. In 1903, the first season at the enlarged field, the Gophers played the Michigan Wolverines
Michigan Wolverines
in the first Little Brown Jug game. The stadium continued on as the football team's home until the end of the 1923 season
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Little Brown Jug (college Football Trophy)
The Michigan–Minnesota football rivalry
Michigan–Minnesota football rivalry
is an American college football rivalry between the Michigan Wolverines football
Michigan Wolverines football
team of the University of Michigan
University of Michigan
and Minnesota Golden Gophers football
Minnesota Golden Gophers football
team of the University of Minnesota. The Little Brown
Brown
Jug is an earthenware jug that serves as a trophy awarded to the winner of the game. It is one of the oldest and most played rivalries in American college football, dating to 1892
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Norman E. Brown
Norman Edgar Brown (October 10, 1890 – March 31, 1958) was an American sportswriter and sports editor for the Central Press Association. Brown was born in Ohio
Ohio
in October 1890. At the time of the 1910 United States Census, Brown was living with his parents in Cleveland, Ohio, working as a newspaper reporter.[2] By June 1917, he was the sporting editor of the Cleveland Press.[1] At the time of the 1920 United States Census, Brown was married, and he and his wife (Emily Anna Winter Brown) were living in Lakewood, Ohio, where Brown was the managing editor of a newspaper.[3] During the 1920s, Brown was the sports editor of the Central Press Association and wrote a regular sports column called "Fanning the Beehive" and "Sports Done Brown."[4][5][6] He was also known for his annual college football All-American team selections
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Eastern Time Zone
The Eastern Time Zone
Eastern Time Zone
(ET) is a time zone encompassing 17 U.S. states in the eastern part of the contiguous United States, parts of eastern Canada, the state of Quintana Roo
Quintana Roo
in Mexico, Panama
Panama
in Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. Places that use Eastern Standard Time (EST) when observing standard time (autumn/winter) are 5 hours behind Coordinated Universal Time (UTC−05:00). Eastern Daylight Time (EDT), when observing daylight saving time DST (spring/summer) is 4 hours behind Coordinated Universal Time (UTC−04:00). In the northern parts of the time zone, on the second Sunday in March, at 2:00 a.m. EST, clocks are advanced to 3:00 a.m. EDT leaving a one-hour "gap". On the first Sunday in November, at 2:00 a.m. EDT, clocks are moved back to 1:00 a.m. EST, thus "duplicating" one hour
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