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15 Cm SFH 18
The 15 cm schwere Feldhaubitze 18 or sFH 18 (German: "heavy field howitzer, model 18"), nicknamed Immergrün ("Evergreen"),[3] was the basic German division-level heavy howitzer during the Second World War, serving alongside the smaller but more numerous 10.5 cm leFH 18
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CFB Borden
Canadian Forces
Canadian Forces
Base Borden (also CFB Borden, French: Base des Forces canadiennes Borden or BFC Borden) is a Canadian Forces base
Canadian Forces base
located in Ontario.
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Infantry Gun
Infantry
Infantry
support guns or battalion guns are artillery weapons designed and used to increase firepower of infantry units they are intrinsic to; offering immediate tactical response to the needs of the unit's commanding officer. The designs are typically with short low velocity barrels, and light construction carriages allowing them to be more easily manoeuvred on the battlefield. They are generally used for direct fire missions, as opposed to indirect fire like other artillery units
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Howitzer
A howitzer /ˈhaʊ.ɪtsər/ is a type of artillery piece characterized by a relatively short barrel and the use of comparatively small propellant charges to propel projectiles over relatively high trajectories, with a steep angle of descent.Pre- World War I
World War I
290 mm howitzer battery at Charlottenlund
Charlottenlund
Fort, Denmark.In the taxonomies of artillery pieces used by European (and European-style) armies in the 17th to 20th centuries, the howitzer stood between the "gun" (characterized by a longer barrel, larger propelling charges, smaller shells, higher velocities, and flatter trajectories) and the "mortar" (which was meant to fire at even higher angles of ascent and descent)
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Kilogram
The kilogram or kilogramme (symbol: kg) is the base unit of mass in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI), and is defined as being equal to the mass of the International Prototype of the Kilogram
Kilogram
(IPK, also known as "Le Grand K" or "Big K"),[2] a cylinder of platinum-iridium alloy stored by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures
International Bureau of Weights and Measures
at Saint-Cloud, France. The kilogram was originally defined as the mass of a litre (cubic decimetre) of water at its freezing point. That was an inconvenient quantity to precisely replicate, so in the late 18th century a platinum artefact was fashioned as a standard for the kilogram
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Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
is the branch of an army that engages in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and tank forces. Also known as foot soldiers, infantry traditionally relies on moving by foot between combats as well, but may also use mounts, military vehicles, or other transport
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First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Kilometer
The kilometre (International spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures; SI symbol: km; /ˈkɪləmiːtər/ or /kɪˈlɒmɪtər/) or kilometer (American spelling) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one thousand metres (kilo- being the SI prefix
SI prefix
for 7003100000000000000♠1000)
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German Re-armament
The German rearmament (Aufrüstung, German pronunciation: [ˈaʊ̯fˌʀʏstʊŋ]) was an era of rearmament in Germany
Germany
during the interwar period (1918–1939), in violation of the Treaty of Versailles. It began as soon as the treaty was signed, on a small, secret, and informal basis,[1] but it was massively expanded after the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
came to power in 1933. Despite its scale, the Aufrüstung was for years a largely covert operation, carried out mostly in a secretive manner through organizations (some of which were racketeer-style fronts), until the reality of the German rearmament was exposed by Carl von Ossietzky
Carl von Ossietzky
in 1931
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Rocket Assisted Projectile
A Rocket
Rocket
Assisted Projectile is an artillery, cannon or recoilless rifle round incorporating a rocket motor for independent propulsion. This grants the projectile both greater speed and range than an ordinary shell, which is propelled only by the ballistic force of the gun's exploding charge. Some forms of Rocket
Rocket
Assisted Projectiles can be outfitted with a laser-guide for greater accuracy. The North Korean M-1978 / M1989 (KOKSAN) 170mm self-propelled gun can use rocket assisted projectiles to achieve a range of around 60 kilometres (37 mi); at one time this was the world's longest range artillery piece.[1] When NATO standards required member armies to have corps-level artillery that could fire to a minimum range of 30,000 metres (19 mi), nearly all member nations solved the problem with RAP rounds in their 155 mm (6.1 inch) artillery
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Corps
Corps
Corps
(/kɔːr/; plural corps /kɔːrz/; via French, from the Latin corpus "body") is a term used for several different kinds of organization. Within military terminology a corps may be:an operational formation, sometimes known as a field corps, which consists of two or more divisions, such as the Corps
Corps
d'armée, later known as I Corps
Corps
("First Corps") of Napoleon's Grande Armée); an administrative corps (or mustering) – that is a specialized branch of a military service (such as an artillery corps, a medical corps, or a force of military police) or; in some cases, a distinct service within a national military (such as the United States Marine Corps).These usages often overlap
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Wehrmacht
The Wehrmacht (German pronunciation: [ˈveːɐ̯maxt] ( listen), lit. "defence force")[N 2] were the unified armed forces of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
from 1935 to 1946. It consisted of the Heer (army), the Kriegsmarine
Kriegsmarine
(navy) and the Luftwaffe
Luftwaffe
(air force).[4] The designation Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
replaced the previously used term Reichswehr, and was the manifestation of Nazi Germany's efforts to rearm the nation to a greater extent than the Treaty of Versailles
Treaty of Versailles
permitted.[5] After the Nazi seizure of power
Nazi seizure of power
in 1933, one of Adolf Hitler's most overt and audacious moves was to establish the Wehrmacht, a modern armed force fully capable of offensive use
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Evergreen
In botany, an evergreen is a plant that has leaves throughout the year, always green. This is true even if the plant retains its foliage only in warm climates, and contrasts with deciduous plants, which completely lose their foliage during the winter or dry season
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Duralumin
Duralumin
Duralumin
(also called duraluminum, duraluminium, duralum, duralium or dural) is a trade name for one of the earliest types of age-hardenable aluminium alloys. Its use as a trade name is obsolete, and today the term mainly refers to aluminium–copper alloys, designated as the 2000 series by the International Alloy Designation System (IADS), as with 2014 and 2024 alloys used in airframe fabrication.Contents1 Alloying elements 2 History 3 Aviation applications 4 Corrosion
Corrosion
protection 5 Applications 6 Popular culture 7 ReferencesAlloying elements[edit] In addition to aluminium, the main materials in duralumin are copper, manganese and magnesium. Duralumin
Duralumin
is 95% aluminium, 4% copper, 0.5% magnesium, and 0.5% manganese. History[edit] Duralumin
Duralumin
was developed by the German metallurgist Alfred Wilm at Dürener Metallwerke AG
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Type 38 15 Cm Howitzer
The Type 38 15 cm Howitzer (三八式十五糎榴弾砲, Sanhachi-shiki Jyūgo-senchi Ryūdanhō) was a 1905 German design that was purchased by the Empire of Japan as the standard heavy howitzer of the Imperial Japanese Army at the end of the Russo-Japanese War. The Type 38 designation was given to this gun as it was accepted in the 38th year of Emperor Meiji's reign (1905).[1]Contents1 History and development 2 Design 3 Combat record 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory and development[edit] As Japan's priority lay in her navy, the Imperial Army was given a back seat to new land warfare designs, as well as the raw material (steel) needed to build them. Thus, like the US who purchased French Renault tanks (Model 1917s) for its first tank units, the planners at the Imperial Japanese Army General Staff found it necessary to purchase artillery, and turned to Krupp in Germany
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Type 96 15 Cm Howitzer
The Type 96 15 cm howitzer
Type 96 15 cm howitzer
(九六式十五糎榴弾砲, Kyūroku-shiki Jyūgo-senchi Ryūdanhō) was a 149.1 mm calibre howitzer used by the Imperial Japanese Army
Imperial Japanese Army
during World War II. It was intended to replace the Type 4 15 cm howitzer
Type 4 15 cm howitzer
in front line combat units from 1937, although it fired the same ammunition.[2] The Type 96 designation was given to this gun as it was accepted in the year 2596 of the Japanese calendar (1936).[3]A battle damaged Type 96 at Yasukuni ShrineContents1 History and development 2 Design 3 Combat record 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Bibliography5 External linksHistory and development[edit] Work on developing a new field howitzer for the Japanese Army began in 1920 and continued for over a decade
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