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15P/Finlay
Comet
Comet
Finlay is a periodic comet in the solar system discovered by William Henry Finlay (Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope, South Africa) on September 26, 1886. It came to perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) on December 27, 2014,[2] at around apparent magnitude 10.[5] When the first parabolic orbit calculations were made in 1886, there was a similarity between this orbit and that of Francesco de Vico's lost periodic comet of 1844 (54P/de Vico-Swift-NEAT)
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Dudley Observatory
Dudley Observatory
Observatory
is an astronomical observatory originally located in Albany, New York, and now in Schenectady, New York. The Observatory was chartered on February 11, 1852 by the New York State Senate, and by the New York State Assembly on April 3, 1852.[1] While Dudley no longer serves as an operating observatory, it remains the oldest non-academic institution of astronomical research in America. While Dudley is not part of Union College, it is part of the coalition of institutions that make up Union University. Other institutions include Albany College of Pharmacy, Albany Law School, Albany Medical College, and the Graduate College of Union University. Dudley Observatory
Observatory
has operated in two observatories since its founding
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Cape Of Good Hope
The Cape of Good Hope
Cape of Good Hope
(Afrikaans: Kaap die Goeie Hoop [ˌkɑːp di ˌχujə ˈɦʊəp], Dutch: Kaap de Goede Hoop [ˌkaːb də ˌɣudə ˈɦoːp] ( listen),[1] Portuguese: Cabo da Boa Esperança [ˈkabu dɐ ˈboɐ ʃpɨˈɾɐ̃sɐ]) is a rocky headland on the Atlantic coast of the Cape Peninsula, South Africa. A common misconception is that the Cape of Good Hope
Cape of Good Hope
is the southern tip of Africa
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Mile
The mile is an English unit of length of linear measure equal to 5,280 feet, or 1,760 yards, and standardised as exactly 1,609.344 metres by international agreement in 1959. With qualifiers, "mile" is also used to describe or translate a wide range of units derived from or roughly equivalent to the Roman mile, such as the nautical mile (now 1.852 km exactly), the Italian mile (roughly 1.852 km), and the Chinese mile (now 500 m exactly). The Romans divided their mile into 5,000 feet but the greater importance of furlongs in pre-modern England meant that the statute mile was made equivalent to 8 furlongs or 5,280 feet in 1593. This form of the mile then spread to the British-colonized nations who continue to employ the mile. The US Geological Survey now employs the metre for official purposes but legacy data from its 1927 geodetic datum has meant that a separate US survey mile (6336/3937 km) continues to see some use
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Kilometre
The kilometre (International spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures; SI symbol: km; /ˈkɪləmiːtər/ or /kɪˈlɒmɪtər/) or kilometer (American spelling) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one thousand metres (kilo- being the SI prefix
SI prefix
for 7003100000000000000♠1000)
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Objective Lens
In optical engineering, the objective is the optical element that gathers light from the object being observed and focuses the light rays to produce a real image. Objectives can be a single lens or mirror, or combinations of several optical elements. They are used in microscopes, telescopes, cameras, slide projectors, CD players and many other optical instruments. Objectives are also called object lenses, object glasses, or objective glasses.Contents1 Types1.1 Microscope 1.2 Photography and imaging 1.3 Telescope2 See also 3 ReferencesTypes[edit] Microscope[edit] The objective lens of a microscope is the one at the bottom near the sample. At its simplest, it is a very high-powered magnifying glass, with very short focal length. This is brought very close to the specimen being examined so that the light from the specimen comes to a focus inside the microscope tube
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Binoculars
Binoculars
Binoculars
or field glasses are two telescopes mounted side-by-side and aligned to point in the same direction, allowing the viewer to use both eyes (binocular vision) when viewing distant objects
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Sasaki
Sasaki (佐々木) is the 13th most common Japanese surname
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Jupiter
by volume:6999890000000000000♠89%±2.0% hydrogen (H 2)6999100000000000000♠10%±2.0% helium (He)6997300000000000000♠0.3%±0.1% methane (CH 4)6996259999999999999♠0.026%±0.004% ammonia (NH 3)6995280000000000000♠0.0028%±0.001% hydrogen deuteride (HD)6994599999999999999♠0.0006%±0.0002% ethane (C 2H 6)6994400000000000000♠0.0004%±0.0004% water (H 2O)Ices:ammonia (NH 3) water (H 2O) ammonium hydrosulfide (NH 4SH) Jupiter
Jupiter
is the fifth planet from the Sun
Sun
and the largest in the Solar System. It is a giant planet with a mass one-thousandth that of the Sun, but two-and-a-half times that of all the other planets in the Solar System
Solar System
combined. Jupiter
Jupiter
and Saturn
Saturn
are gas giants; the other two giant planets, Uranus
Uranus
and Neptune
Neptune
are ice giants
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Schenectady, New York
Schenectady /skəˈnɛktədi/[3][4] is a city in Schenectady County, New York, United States, of which it is the county seat. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 66,135. The name "Schenectady" is derived from a Mohawk word skahnéhtati meaning "beyond the pines". The city was founded on the south side of the Mohawk River
Mohawk River
by Dutch colonists in the 17th century, many from the Albany area. They were prohibited from the fur trade by the Albany monopoly, which kept its control after the English takeover in 1664. Residents of the new village developed farms on strip plots along the river. Connected to the west via the Mohawk River
Mohawk River
and Erie Canal, the city developed rapidly in the 19th century as part of the Mohawk Valley trade, manufacturing and transportation corridor
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Provisional Designation In Astronomy
Provisional designation in astronomy is the naming convention applied to astronomical objects immediately following their discovery. The provisional designation is usually superseded by a permanent designation once a reliable orbit has been calculated
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Lewis Boss
Lewis Boss
Lewis Boss
(26 October 1846 – 5 October 1912) was an American astronomer. He served as the director of the Dudley Observatory
Dudley Observatory
in Schenectady, New York.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Death and legacy 4 Family life 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Boss was born in Providence, Rhode Island
Providence, Rhode Island
to Samuel P. and Lucinda (née Joslin) Boss,[1] and attended secondary school at the Lapham Institute in North Scituate[2] and the New Hampton Institution
New Hampton Institution
in New Hampshire.[3] In 1870, he graduated from Dartmouth College,[4] then went to work as a clerk for the U.S. Government. Career[edit] He served as an assistant astronomer for a government expedition to survey the U.S-Canada– United States
United States
border
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Gary W. Kronk
Gary W. Kronk (born 1956) is an American amateur astronomer and writer.Contents1 Biography 2 Awards 3 Publications 4 Personal Web Sites 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Kronk was born in Granite City, Illinois, United States, on March 23, 1956. He developed an interest in space at an early age, during the time of the first manned space flights of project Mercury; however, it was Mariner 4's close-up images of Mars that appeared on television the night of July 14, 1965 that focused his interest to astronomy. This interest was focused even more by Comet Kohoutek
Comet Kohoutek
(C/1973 E1). Kronk first observed this comet on November 30, 1973, when he was a senior in high school. This observation provided the encouragement to research and write a paper about this comet and other great comets of the past for school. The teacher liked the paper so much, she submitted it to the local paper
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Universe Today
Universe Today
Universe Today
(UT) is a popular North American-based non-commercial space and astronomy news website. The domain was registered on December 31, 1998,[3] and the website went live in March 1999, founded by Fraser Cain.[4] The Universe Today
Universe Today
assumed its current form on 24 July 2003, featuring astronomy news and space-related issues. By early September 2005, the forum section merged with Bad Astronomy as a combined site with the BAUT forum. During April 2011, the Association of British Science Writers noted that Universe Today decided not to make preparations for reporting on embargoed stories until they are public knowledge.[5][6] Emily Lakdawalla
Emily Lakdawalla
said that she relies on Universe Today
Universe Today
and Bad Astronomy
Astronomy
to "give ..
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Francesco De Vico
Father Francesco de Vico
Francesco de Vico
(also known as de Vigo, De Vico and even DeVico; May 19, 1805, in Macerata
Macerata
– November 15, 1848, in London) was an Italian astronomer and a Jesuit
Jesuit
priest.Contents1 Biography 2 Work 3 Obituary 4 See also 5 ReferencesBiography[edit] He was educated at the college of Urbino, and became in 1835 assistant superintendent, and in 1839 director of the Vatican Observatory.[1] The Revolutions of 1848 in the Italian states
The Revolutions of 1848 in the Italian states
cut short his observing career, as he was forced into exile, touring Paris, London, and the United States, where he was received by the President. He was pleased with his reception in the U.S
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Apparent Magnitude
The apparent magnitude (m) of a celestial object is a number that is a measure of its brightness as seen by an observer on Earth. The brighter an object appears, the lower its magnitude value (i.e. inverse relation). The Sun, at apparent magnitude of −27, is the brightest object in the sky. It is adjusted to the value it would have in the absence of the atmosphere. Furthermore, the magnitude scale is logarithmic. A difference of 1 in magnitude corresponds to a change in brightness by a factor of 5√100, or about 2.512. The measurement of apparent magnitudes or brightnesses of celestial objects is known as photometry. Apparent magnitudes are used to quantify the brightness of sources at ultraviolet, visible, and infrared wavelengths. An apparent magnitude is usually measured in a specific passband corresponding to some photometric system such as the UBV system
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