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13th Century
As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century
13th century
was the century which lasted from January 1, 1201 through December 31, 1300
1300
in accordance with the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
in the Common Era
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Real-time Tactics
Real-time tactics
Real-time tactics
or RTT[1] is a subgenre of tactical wargames played in real-time simulating the considerations and circumstances of operational warfare and military tactics
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Eurasia
Eurasia
Eurasia
/jʊəˈreɪʒə/ is a combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia.[3][4][5] The term is a portmanteau of its constituent continents ( Europe
Europe
and Asia)
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House Of Plantagenet
The House of Plantagenet[nb 1] (/plænˈtædʒənɪt/) was a royal house which originated from the lands of Anjou
Anjou
in France. The name Plantagenet is used by modern historians to identify four distinct royal houses: the Angevins, who were also Counts of Anjou; the main body of the Plantagenets following the loss of Anjou; and the Plantagenets' two cadet branches, the Houses of Lancaster and York. The family held the English throne
English throne
from 1154, with the accession of Henry II, until 1485, when Richard III died. Under the Plantagenets, England
England
was transformed – although this was only partly intentional. The Plantagenet kings were often forced to negotiate compromises such as Magna Carta. These constrained royal power in return for financial and military support. The king was no longer just the most powerful man in the nation, holding the prerogative of judgement, feudal tribute and warfare
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Normandy
Normandy
Normandy
(/ˈnɔːrməndi/; French: Normandie, pronounced [nɔʁmɑ̃di] ( listen), Norman: Normaundie, from Old French
Old French
Normanz, plural of Normant, originally from the word for "northman" in several Scandinavian languages)[2] is one of the 18 regions of France, roughly corresponding to the historical Duchy of Normandy. Administratively, Normandy
Normandy
is divided into five départements: Calvados, Eure, Manche, Orne, and Seine-Maritime. It covers 30,627 square kilometres (11,825 sq mi),[3] comprising roughly 5% of the territory of metropolitan France
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Latin Empire
The Empire of Romania[2] (Latin: Imperium Romaniae), more commonly known in historiography as the Latin
Latin
Empire or Latin
Latin
Empire of Constantinople, and known to the Byzantines as the Frankokratia
Frankokratia
or the Latin
Latin
Occupation,[3] was a feudal Crusader state
Crusader state
founded by the leaders of the Fourth Crusade
Fourth Crusade
on lands captured from the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire. It was established after the capture of Constantinople
Constantinople
in 1204 and lasted until 1261
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Fourth Crusade
Crusaders:Republic of Venice Holy Roman EmpireMarch of Montferrat County of Hainaut Prince-Bishopric of Halberstadt Pairis AbbeyKingdom of FranceCounty of Champagne County of Blois Duchy of Burgundy County of Flanders County of Saint-Pol Île-de-France AmiensByzantine Empire Second Bulgarian EmpireCommanders and leadersEnrico Dandolo Boniface I of Montferrat Theobald III of Champagne Balduin of Flanders Louis I of Blois Hugh IV of Saint-Pol Conrad of Halberstadt Martin of Pairis Alexios IV
Alexios IV
AngelosAlexios III Angelos
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National Central Library (Florence)
The National Central Library
Library
of Florence
Florence
(Italian: Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze, BNCF) is a public national library in Florence, the largest in Italy
Italy
and one of the most important in Europe, one of the two central libraries of Italy, along with the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale of Rome.Contents1 History 2 Thesaurus 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 Gallery6.1 Exteriors 6.2 Interiors 6.3 Manuscripts7 External linksHistory[edit] The library was founded in 1714 when scholar Antonio Magliabechi bequeathed his entire collection of books, encompassing approximately 30,000 volumes, to the city of Florence. By 1743, it was required that a copy of every work published in Tuscany
Tuscany
be submitted to the library. Originally known as the Magliabechiana, the library was opened to the public in 1747
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Fibonacci
Fibonacci
Fibonacci
(c. 1175 – c
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Moinuddin Chishti
Chishtī Muʿīn al-Dīn Ḥasan Sijzī (1142–1236 CE), known more commonly as Muʿīn al-Dīn Chishtī or Moinuddin Chishti,[6] or reverently as a Shaykh Muʿīn al-Dīn or Muʿīn al-Dīn or Khwājā Muʿīn al-Dīn by Muslims of the Indian subcontinent, was a Persian Muslim[1] preacher,[6] ascetic, religious scholar, philosopher, and mystic from Sistan,[6] who eventually ended up settling in the Indian subcontinent in the early 13th-century, where he promulgated the famous Chishtiyya order of Sunni
Sunni
mysticism.[6][7] This particular tariqa (order) became the dominant Muslim
Muslim
spiritual group in medieval India
India
and many of the most beloved and venerated Indian Sunni saints[2][8][9] were Chishti
Chishti
in their affiliation, including Nizamuddin Awliya
Nizamuddin Awliya
(d. 1325) and Amir Khusrow
Amir Khusrow
(d
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Islamic Scholar
Islamic studies
Islamic studies
refers to the study of Islam
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Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
Europe
is the eastern part of the European continent. There is no consensus on the precise area it covers, partly because the term has a wide range of geopolitical, geographical, cultural, and socioeconomic connotations. There are "almost as many definitions of Eastern Europe
Europe
as there are scholars of the region".[1] A related United Nations
United Nations
paper adds that "every assessment of spatial identities is essentially a social and cultural construct".[2] One definition describes Eastern Europe
Europe
as a cultural entity: the region lying in Europe
Europe
with the main characteristics consisting of Greek, Byzantine, Eastern Orthodox, Russian, and some Ottoman culture influences.[3][4] Another definition was created during the Cold War and used more or less synonymously with the term Eastern Bloc
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Eastern Asia
East Asia
Asia
or Northeast Asia
Northeast Asia
is the eastern subregion of the Asian continent, which can be defined in either geographical[3] or pan-ethno-cultural[4] terms.[5][6] Geographically and geopolitically, the region constitutes Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Japan, Mongolia, North Korea, South Korea, and Taiwan.[7][8][9][10][11][3][12][13][14][15] The region was the cradle of various ancient civilizations such as Ancient China, ancient Japan, ancient Korea, and the Mongol Empire.[16][17] East Asia
Asia
was one of the cradles of world civilization, with China, an ancient East Asian civilization being one of the earliest cradles of civilization in human history
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Common Era
Common Era or Current Era (CE)[1] is a name for a calendar era widely used around the world today. The era preceding CE is known as before the Common or Current Era (BCE). The Current Era notation system can be used as an alternative to the Dionysian era
Dionysian era
system, which distinguishes eras as AD (anno Domini, "[the] year of [the] Lord")[2] and BC ("before Christ"). The two notation systems are numerically equivalent; thus "2018 CE" corresponds to "AD 2018" and "400 BCE" corresponds to "400 BC".[2][3][4][a] Both notations refer to the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
(and its predecessor, the Julian calendar)
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Video Game
A video game is an electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device, but as of the 2000s, it implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. Some theorists categorize video games as an art form, but this designation is controversial. The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices
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Century
A century (from the Latin
Latin
centum, meaning one hundred; abbreviated c.[1]) is a period of 100 years. Centuries are numbered ordinally in English and many other languages. A centenary is a hundredth anniversary, or a celebration of this, typically the remembrance of an event which took place a hundred years earlier.Contents1 Start and end in the Gregorian calendar1.1 Viewpoint 1: Strict usage 1.2 Viewpoint 2: General usage2 1st century BC and AD 3 Dating units in other calendar systems 4 Centuries in astronomical year numbering 5 Alternative naming systems 6 See also 7 References 8 BibliographyStart and end in the Gregorian calendar[edit] Although a century can mean any arbitrary period of 100 years, there are two viewpoints on the nature of standard centuries
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