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11th United States Congress
The Eleventh United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate
United States Senate
and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
from March 4, 1809 to March 4, 1811, during the first two years of James Madison's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Second Census of the United States in 1800
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William H. Crawford
William Harris Crawford (February 24, 1772 – September 15, 1834) was an American politician and judge during the early 19th century. He served as United States Secretary of War
United States Secretary of War
and United States
United States
Secretary of the Treasury before running for president in the 1824 election. Born in Virginia, Crawford moved to Georgia at a young age. After studying law, Crawford won election to the Georgia House of Representatives in 1803. He aligned with the Democratic-Republican Party and U.S. Senator James Jackson. In 1807, the Georgia legislature elected Crawford to the United States
United States
Senate. After the death of Vice President George Clinton, Crawford's position as president pro tempore of the Senate made him first in the presidential line of succession from April 1812 to March 1813. In 1813, President James Madison appointed Crawford as the U.S
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Democratic-Republican Party (United States)
The Democratic-Republican Party
Democratic-Republican Party
was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison
James Madison
between 1791 and 1793 to oppose the centralizing policies of the new Federalist Party
Federalist Party
run by Alexander Hamilton, who was secretary of the treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration.[5] From 1801 to 1825, the new party controlled the presidency and Congress as well as most states during the First Party System. It began in 1791 as one faction in Congress and included many politicians who had been opposed to the new constitution. They called themselves "Republicans" after their ideology, republicanism. They distrusted the Federalist commitment to republicanism
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West Florida
Flag British West Florida
British West Florida
in 1767.Capital Pensacola
Pensacola
(1763)Governor •  1763 George JohnstoneHistory •  Treaty of Paris February 10, 1763 •  Transferred to Spain 1783 •  Treaty of San Lorenzo 1795 •  Treaty of San Ildefonso 1800 •  Republic of West Florida 1810 •  Annexation by U.S. December 10, 18101810–1821West Florida
Florida
(Spanish: Florida
Florida
Occidental) was a region on the north shore of the Gulf of Mexico
Gulf of Mexico
that underwent several boundary and sovereignty changes during its history
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United States Statutes At Large
The United States Statutes at Large, commonly referred to as the Statutes at Large and abbreviated Stat., are an official record of Acts of Congress and concurrent resolutions passed by the United States Congress. Each act and resolution of Congress is originally published as a slip law, which is classified as either public law (abbreviated Pub.L.) or private law (Pvt.L.), and designated and numbered accordingly. At the end of a Congressional session, the statutes enacted during that session are compiled into bound books, known as "session law" publications. The session law publication for U.S. Federal statutes is called the United States Statutes at Large. In that publication, the public laws and private laws are numbered and organised in chronological order.[1] U.S
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List Of Proposed Amendments To The United States Constitution
Hundreds of proposed amendments to the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
are introduced during each session of the United States Congress. From 1789 through January 3, 2017, approximately 11,699 measures have been proposed to amend the United States Constitution.[1] Collectively, members of the House and Senate typically propose around 200 amendments during each two–year term of Congress.[2] Most however, never get out of the Congressional committees in which they were proposed, and only a fraction of those that do receive enough support to win Congressional approval to actually go through the constitutional ratification process. Some proposed amendments are introduced over and over again in different sessions of Congress
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United States Constitution
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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State Legislature (United States)
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Ratification
Ratification is a principal's approval of an act of its agent where the agent lacked authority to legally bind the principal. Ratification defines the international act whereby a state indicates its consent to be bound to a treaty if the parties intended to show their consent by such an act. In the case of bilateral treaties, ratification is usually accomplished by exchanging the requisite instruments, while in the case of multilateral treaties the usual procedure is for the depositary to collect the ratifications of all states, keeping all parties informed of the situation. The institution of ratification grants states the necessary time-frame to seek the required approval for the treaty on the domestic level and to enact the necessary legislation to give domestic effect to that treaty.[1] The term applies to private contract law, international treaties, and constitutions in federations such as the United States
United States
and Canada
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Federalist Party (United States)
The Federalist Party, referred to as the Pro-Administration Party until the 3rd United States Congress, was the first American political party. It existed from the early 1790s to 1816, though its remnants lasted into the 1820s. The Federalists called for a strong national government that promoted economic growth and fostered friendly relationships with Great Britain as well as opposition to revolutionary France. The party controlled the federal government until 1801, when it was overwhelmed by the Democratic-Republican
Democratic-Republican
opposition led by Thomas Jefferson. The Federalist Party
Federalist Party
came into being between 1792 and 1794 as a national coalition of bankers and businessmen in support of Alexander Hamilton's fiscal policies. These supporters developed into the organized Federalist Party, which was committed to a fiscally sound and nationalistic government
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Presidency Of James Madison
The presidency of James Madison
James Madison
began on March 4, 1809, when James Madison was inaugurated as President of the United States, and ended on March 4, 1817. Madison, the fourth United States
United States
president, took office after defeating Federalist Charles Cotesworth Pinckney decisively in the 1808 presidential election. He was re-elected four years later, defeating DeWitt Clinton
DeWitt Clinton
in the 1812 election. His presidency was dominated by the War of 1812
War of 1812
with Britain. Madison was succeeded by Secretary of State James Monroe, a fellow member of the Democratic-Republican Party. Madison's presidency was dominated by the effects of the ongoing Napoleonic Wars
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President Of The United States Senate
The Vice President of the United States
United States
(informally referred to as VPOTUS, or Veep) is a constitutional officer in the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States
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Classes Of United States Senators
The three classes of United States Senators are made up of 33 or 34 Senate seats each. The purpose of the classes is to determine which Senate seats will be up for election in a given year. The three groups are staggered so that one of them is up for election every two years, rather than having all 100 seats up for election at once. For example, the 33 Senate seats of Class 1 will be up for election in 2018, the elections for the 33 seats of Class 2 will take place in 2020, and the elections for 34 seats of Class 3 will be held in 2022. The three classes were established by Article I, Section 3, Clause 2 of the U.S. Constitution
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United States Senate Elections, 1814
Democratic-RepublicanElected Majority party Democratic-RepublicanThe United States
United States
Senate elections of 1814 and 1815 were elections that had the Democratic-Republican Party
Democratic-Republican Party
lose a seat but still retain an overwhelming majority in the United States
United States
Senate. Unlike in recent elections, the minority Federalists had gone into the elections with a change of regaining their long-lost majority had they swept almost all the seats. However, only one seat switched parties
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United States Senate Elections, 1812
Democratic-RepublicanElected Majority party Democratic-RepublicanThe United States
United States
Senate elections of 1812 and 1813 were elections that, coinciding with President James Madison's re-election, had the Democratic-Republican Party
Democratic-Republican Party
lose two seats but still retain an overwhelming majority in the United States
United States
Senate
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James Hillhouse
lawyer realtor politician James Hillhouse
James Hillhouse
(October 20, 1754 – December 29, 1832) was an American lawyer, real estate developer, and politician from New Haven, Connecticut. He represented the state in both chambers of the US Congress.Contents1 Early life 2 Revolutionary War 3 Career 4 Legacy 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Hillhouse was born in Montville, Connecticut, the son of William Hillhouse and Sarah (Griswold) Hillhouse.[1] At the age of seven, he was adopted by his childless uncle and aunt, James Abraham and Mary Lucas Hillhouse. He attended the Hopkins Grammar School
Hopkins Grammar School
in New Haven, Connecticut
Connecticut
and graduated from Yale College
Yale College
in 1773. At Yale he was a member of the Linonian Society
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