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.50 BMG
The .50 Browning Machine Gun (.50 BMG, 12.7×99mm NATO
NATO
and designated as the 50 Browning by the C.I.P.[1]) is a cartridge developed for the Browning .50 caliber machine gun in the late 1910s. Entering service officially in 1921, the round is based on a greatly scaled-up .30-06 cartridge. Under STANAG 4383, it is a standard cartridge for NATO forces as well as many non- NATO
NATO
countries. The cartridge itself has been made in many variants: multiple generations of regular ball, tracer, armor-piercing (AP), incendiary, and saboted sub-caliber rounds
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.300 Winchester Magnum
The .300 Winchester Magnum
.300 Winchester Magnum
(also known as .300 Win Mag or 300WM) (7.62×67mm) is a belted, bottlenecked magnum rifle cartridge that was introduced by Winchester Repeating Arms Company
Winchester Repeating Arms Company
in 1963. The .300 Winchester Magnum is a magnum cartridge designed to fit in a standard rifle action. It is based on the .375 H&H Magnum, which has been blown out, shortened, and necked down to accept a .30 caliber (7.62 mm) bullet.[3] The .300 Winchester is extremely versatile and has been adopted by a wide range of users including hunters, target shooters, military units, and law enforcement departments. Hunters found the cartridge to be an effective all-around choice with bullet options ranging from the flatter shooting 165 grain to the harder hitting 200+ grain selections available from the factory
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Sabot
A sabot (UK and Int.: /sæˈboʊ/, /ˈsæboʊ/, US: /ˈseɪboʊ/) is a structural device used in firearm or cannon ammunition to keep a sub-caliber flight projectile, such as a relatively small bullet or arrow-type projectile, in the center of the barrel when fired, if the bullet has a significantly smaller diameter than the bore diameter of the weapon used. The sabot component in projectile design is more than simply the relatively thin, tough and deformable seal known as a driving band or obturation ring needed to trap propellant gases behind a projectile, and also keep the projectile centered in the barrel, when the outer shell of the projectile is only slightly smaller in diameter than the caliber of the barrel
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Primer (firearm)
In firearms, the primer (/ˈpraɪmər/) is a component of handgun and rifle cartridges and shotgun shells, and is responsible for initiating the propellant combustion that will push the projectiles out of the gun barrel. Early primers were simply the same black powder used to fire muzzleloaders but poured into an external flash pan, where it could be ignited by an ignition source such as a slow match or a flintlock. This external powder was connected through a small opening at the rear of the gun barrel that led to the main charge within the barrel. As gunpowder will not burn when wet, this made it difficult (or even impossible) to fire these types of weapons in rainy or humid conditions. Modern primers are made of shock-sensitive chemicals
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Small Arms Ammunition Pressure Testing
Small arms ammunition pressure testing is used to establish standards for maximum average peak pressures of chamberings, as well as determining the safety of particular loads for the purposes of new load development. In metallic cartridges, peak pressure can vary based on propellant used, primers used, charge weight, projectile type, projectile seating depth, neck tension, chamber throat/leade parameters. In shotshells, the primary factors are charge weight, projectile weight, wad type, hull construction, and crimp quality.Contents1 Modern civilian test methodologies1.1 C.I.P
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.308 Winchester
The .308 Winchester
.308 Winchester
(pronounced: "three-oh-eight") is a rimless, bottlenecked rifle cartridge and is the commercial cartridge from which the 7.62×51mm NATO
7.62×51mm NATO
round was derived. The .308 Winchester
.308 Winchester
was introduced in 1952, two years prior to the NATO
NATO
adoption of the 7.62×51mm NATO
7.62×51mm NATO
T65. Winchester branded the cartridge and introduced it to the commercial hunting market as the .308 Winchester. Winchester's Model 70 and Model 88 rifles were subsequently chambered for the new cartridge. Since then, the .308 Winchester
.308 Winchester
has become the most popular short-action, big-game hunting cartridge worldwide.[2] It is also commonly used for civilian hunting, target shooting, metallic silhouette, bench rest target shooting, palma, metal matches, military sniping, and police sharpshooting
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STANAG
In NATO
NATO
a STANdardization AGreement (STANAG) defines processes, procedures, terms, and conditions for common military or technical procedures or equipment between the member countries of the alliance. Each NATO
NATO
state ratifies a STANAG and implements it within their own military. The purpose is to provide common operational and administrative procedures and logistics, so one member nation's military may use the stores and support of another member's military. STANAGs also form the basis for technical interoperability between a wide variety of communication and information systems (CIS) essential for NATO
NATO
and Allied operations
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Full Metal Jacket Bullet
A full metal jacket (FMJ) bullet is a small-arms projectile consisting of a soft core (often lead) encased in a shell of harder metal, such as gilding metal, cupronickel, or less commonly a steel alloy. In military nomenclature, it is often labeled ball ammunition. The use of full metal jacketing in military ammunition came about in part because of the need for improved feeding characteristics in small arms using internal mechanical manipulation of the cartridge to chamber rounds as opposed to externally hand-reloading single-shot firearms. The harder gilding was less prone to deformation than softer exposed lead, which improved feeding
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Incendiary Ammunition
Incendiary ammunition
Incendiary ammunition
is a type of firearm ammunition containing a compound that burns rapidly and causes fires.[1]Contents1 World War I 2 World War II 3 Modern 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Bibliography 7 External linksWorld War I[edit]Some sectioned shells from the First World War. From left to right: 90 mm shrapnel shell, 120 mm pig iron incendiary shell, 77/14 model - 75 mm high-explosive shell, model 16–75 mm shrapnel shellThe first time incendiary ammunition was widely used was in World War I. At the time, phosphorus was the primary ingredient in the incendiary charge and ignited upon firing, leaving a trail of blue smoke. These early forms were also known as "smoke tracers" because of this
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Conflict In Najran, Jizan And Asir
Ongoing Houthis
Houthis
and allies take control of a strip of Saudi territory on the border, ranging from Ghawiyah
Ghawiyah
(Jizan) in the west to Al-Shurafa (Najran) in the east.Belligerents Saudi ArabiaSaudi Arabian National Guard Royal Saudi Land Force Salafist fighters[1]   Qatar
Qatar
(until 2017)  Jordan[2]  Sudan[3]  Pakistan[4] Supported by:  NATO  Yemen
Yemen
(Revolutionary Committee/Supreme Political Council) Houthis Republican Guard (2015-17) Ahrar al-Najran
Ahrar al-Najran
(since June 2015)Commanders and leaders Gen. Awad bin Eid Al-Balawi (Director General of Saudi Border Guard) Maj. Gen. Abdul Rahman bin Saad al-Shahrani † (Commander of 18th Brigade)[6] Abdul-Malik Badreddin al-Houthi Abu Bakr Abu Ahmed as-Salami Brig. Gen
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Match Grade
Match grade
Match grade
frequently refers to quality firearm parts and ammunition that are suitable for a competitive match. Sometimes it also refers to other devices and parts that are made with high precision in mind. Description[edit] In firearms, the term is used to refer to ammunition and gun parts that are designed and manufactured in such a way that they have a relatively narrow tolerance and high level of accuracy. No standards are defined for its qualification[1] and as such it is more of a relative term. In addition to its use in shooting sports, match grade equipment is often employed by military and law enforcement sharpshooters. Thus, many gun manufacturers use the term "match grade" to describe their products
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Armored Fighting Vehicle
An armoured fighting vehicle (AFV) is an armed combat vehicle protected by armour, generally combining operational mobility with tactical offensive and defensive capabilities. AFVs can be wheeled or tracked. Tanks, armoured cars, armoured self-propelled guns, and armoured personnel carriers are all examples of AFVs. The concept of a highly mobile and protected fighting unit has been around for centuries; from Hannibal's war elephants to Leonardo's war machines, military strategists endeavoured to maximize the mobility and survivability of their soldiers. Armoured fighting vehicles are classified according to their intended role on the battlefield and characteristics. This classification is not absolute; at different times different countries will classify the same vehicle in different roles. For example, armoured personnel carriers were generally replaced by infantry fighting vehicles in a similar role, but the latter has some capabilities lacking in the former
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Anti-tank Rifle
An anti-tank rifle is a rifle designed to penetrate the armor of vehicles, particularly tanks. The usefulness of rifles for this purpose ran from the introduction of tanks in World War I
World War I
until the Korean War. While medium and heavy tank armor became too thick to be penetrated by rigid projectiles from rifles that could be carried by a single soldier, anti-tank rifles continued to be used against other targets, though recoilless rifles and rocket-propelled grenades such as the bazooka were also introduced for infantry close-layer defense against tanks
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British Heavy Tanks Of World War I
British heavy tanks were a series of related armoured fighting vehicles developed by the UK during the First World War. The Mark I was the world's first tank, tracked and armed armoured vehicle, to enter combat. The name "tank" was initially a code name to maintain secrecy and disguise its true purpose.[3] The type was developed in 1915 to break the stalemate of trench warfare. It could survive the machine gun and small-arms fire in "No Man's Land", travel over difficult terrain, crush barbed wire, and cross trenches to assault fortified enemy positions with powerful armament. Tanks also carried supplies and troops. British heavy tanks are distinguished by an unusual rhomboidal shape with a high climbing face of the track, designed to cross the wide and deep trenches prevalent on the battlefields of the Western Front. Due to the height necessary for this shape, an armed turret would have made the vehicle too tall and unstable
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