HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info


う in hiragana or ウ in katakana (romanised u) is one of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora. In the modern Japanese system of alphabetical order, they occupy the third place in the modern Gojūon
Gojūon
(五十音) system of collating kana. In the Iroha, they occupied the 24th position, between
and ゐ. In the Gojūon chart (ordered by columns, from right to left), う lies in the first column (あ行, "column A") and the third row (う段, "row U"). Both represent the sound [u͍]
[...More...]

"ウ" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hiragana
Hiragana
Hiragana
(平仮名, ひらがな, Japanese pronunciation: [çiɾaɡana]) is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system, along with katakana, kanji, and in some cases rōmaji (Latin script). It is a phonetic lettering system. The word hiragana literally means "ordinary" or "simple" kana ("simple" originally as contrasted with kanji).[1][2] Hiragana
Hiragana
and katakana are both kana systems. With one or two minor exceptions, each sound in the Japanese language
Japanese language
(strictly, each mora) is represented by one character (or one digraph) in each system. This may be either a vowel such as "a" (hiragana あ); a consonant followed by a vowel such as "ka" (か); or "n" (ん), a nasal sonorant which, depending on the context, sounds either like English m, n, or ng ([ŋ]), or like the nasal vowels of French
[...More...]

"Hiragana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sa (kana)
さ, in hiragana, or サ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, which each represent one mora. Both represent [sa]. The shapes of these kana originate from 左 and 散, respectively. Like き, the hiragana character may be written with or without linking the lower line to the rest of the character. The character may be combined with a dakuten, changing it into ざ in hiragana, ザ in katakana, and za in Hepburn romanization
[...More...]

"Sa (kana)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

E (kana)
In Japanese writing, the kana え (hiragana) and エ (katakana) (romanised e) occupy the fourth place, between う and お, in the modern Gojūon
Gojūon
(五十音) system of collating kana. In the Iroha, they occupy the 34th, between こ and て. In the table at right (ordered by columns, from right to left), え lies in the first column (あ行, "column A") and the fourth row (え段, "row E"). Both represent [e].Form Rōmaji Hiragana KatakanaNormal a/i/u/e/o (あ行 a-gyō) e え エei ee ē えい, えぃ ええ, えぇ えー エイ, エィ エエ, エェ エーContents1 Derivation 2 Variant forms 3 Transliteration 4 Stroke order 5 Other communicative representationsDerivation[edit] え and エ originate, via man'yōgana, from the kanji 衣 and 江, respectively. The archaic kana ゑ (we), as well as many non-initial occurrences of the character へ (he), have entered the modern Japanese language
Japanese language
as え
[...More...]

"E (kana)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ke (kana)
け, in hiragana, or ケ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora. Both represent [ke]
[...More...]

"Ke (kana)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Se (kana)
せ, in hiragana, or セ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora. Both represent the sound [se], and when written with dakuten represent the sound [ze]
[...More...]

"Se (kana)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Te (kana)
て, in hiragana, or テ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora
[...More...]

"Te (kana)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ne (kana)
ね, in hiragana, or ネ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora. The hiragana is made in two strokes, while the katakana is made in four
[...More...]

"Ne (kana)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

He (kana)
へ, in hiragana, or ヘ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, which represents one mora. The two ways of writing this mora are almost identical. Each is written in one stroke and represents [he]. The [he] sound is the only sound that is written identically in hiragana and katakana
[...More...]

"He (kana)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Me (kana)
め, in hiragana, or メ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora
[...More...]

"Me (kana)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Re (kana)
れ, in hiragana, or レ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora. The hiragana is written in two strokes, while katakana in one. Both represent the sound [ɾe] ( listen)
[...More...]

"Re (kana)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

A (kana)
あ in hiragana or ア in katakana (romanised a) is one of the Japanese kana that each represent one mora. あ is based on the sōsho style of kanji 安, and ア is from the radical of kanji 阿. In the modern Japanese system of alphabetical order, it occupies the first position of the alphabet, before い. Additionally, it is the 36th letter in Iroha, after て, before さ. Its hiragana resembles the kana no combined with a cross. The Unicode
Unicode
for あ is U+3042, and the Unicode
Unicode
for ア is U+30A2. The characters represent [a].Form Rōmaji Hiragana KatakanaNormal a/i/u/e/o (あ行 a-gyō) [clarification needed] a あ アaa, ah ā ああ, あぁ あー アア, アァ アーContents1 Derivation 2 Variant forms 3 Stroke order 4 Other communicative representations 5 Footnotes 6 ReferencesDerivation[edit] The katakana ア derives, via man'yōgana, from the left element of kanji 阿
[...More...]

"A (kana)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ka (kana)
か, in hiragana, or カ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, which each represent one mora. Both represent [ka]. The shapes of these kana both originate from 加. The character can be combined with a dakuten, to form が in hiragana, ガ in katakana, and ga in Hepburn romanization. The phonetic value of the modified character is [ɡa] in initial positions, and varying between [ŋa] and [ɣa] in the middle of words. A handakuten (゜) does not occur with ka in normal Japanese text, but it may be used by linguists to indicate a nasal pronunciation [ŋa]. か is the most commonly used interrogatory particle
[...More...]

"Ka (kana)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

I (kana)
い in hiragana or イ in katakana (romanised as i) is one of the Japanese kana each of which represents one mora. い is based on the sōsho style of the kanji character 以, and イ is from the radical (left part) of the kanji character 伊. In the modern Japanese system of alphabetical order, it occupies the second position of the alphabet, between
and う. Additionally, it is the first letter in Iroha, before ろ. Both represent the sound [i]
[...More...]

"I (kana)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ta (kana)
た, in hiragana, or タ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, which each represent one mora. Both represent [ta]
[...More...]

"Ta (kana)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Ueno (other)
Ueno
Ueno
is a neighborhood in Taito, Tokyo. Ueno
Ueno
may also refer to: Places[edit]Ueno, Mie, a former city in Mie Prefecture, now part of the city of
[...More...]

"Ueno (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.