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ציון רבי יוסף קארו
A Rebbe (Hebrew: רבי‎: /ˈrɛbɛ/) or Admor is the spiritual leader in the Hasidic movement, and the personalities of
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Tzadik
Tzadik/Zadik/Sadiq [tsaˈdik] (Hebrew: צדיק‬, "righteous one", pl. tzadikim [tsadiˈkim] צדיקיםṣadiqim) is a title in Judaism given to people considered righteous, such as Biblical figures and later spiritual masters. The root of the word ṣadiq, is ṣ-d-q (צדקtzedek), which means "justice" or "righteousness". The feminine term for a righteous person is tzadeikes/tzaddeket. Tzadik is also the root of the word tzedakah ('charity', literally 'righteousness')
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Kabbalah
Kabbalah (Hebrew: David CLM', 'Taamey Frank CLM', 'Frenk Ruehl CLM', 'Keter YG', 'Shofar', ' David CLM', 'Hadasim CLM', 'Simple CLM', 'Nachlieli', 'SBL BibLit', 'SBL Hebrew', Cardo, Alef, 'Noto Serif Hebrew', 'Noto Sans Hebrew', ' David Libre', David, 'Times New Roman', Gisha, Arial, FreeSerif, FreeSans;" dir="rtl">קַבָּלָה‬, literally "parallel/corresponding," or "received tradition") is an esoteric method, discipline, and school of thought that originated in Judaism
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Modern Orthodox Judaism
Modern Orthodox Judaism (also Modern Orthodox or Modern Orthodoxy) is a movement within Orthodox Judaism that attempts to Torah Umadda">synthesize Jewish values and the observance of Jewish law, with the secular, modern world. Modern Orthodoxy draws on several teachings and philosophies, and thus assumes various forms. In the United States, and generally in the Western world, Torah Umadda">"Centrist Orthodoxy" – underpinned by the philosophy of Torah Umadda"> Torah Umadda (" Torah and [Scientific] Knowledge") – is prevalent
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Conservative Judaism
Conservative Judaism (known as Masorti Judaism outside North America) is a major Jewish denomination, which views Jewish Law, or Halakha, as both binding and subject to historical development. The Conservative rabbinate therefore employs modern historical-critical research, rather than only traditional methods and sources, and lends great weight to its constituency when determining its stance on matters of Law. The movement considers its approach as the authentic and most appropriate continuation of halakhic discourse, maintaining both fealty to received forms and flexibility in their interpretation
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Reform Judaism
Reform Judaism (also known as Liberal Judaism or Progressive Judaism) is a major Jewish denomination that emphasizes the evolving nature of the faith, the superiority of its ethical aspects to the ceremonial ones, and a belief in a continuous revelation not centered on the theophany at Mount Sinai. A liberal strand of Judaism, it is characterized by a lesser stress on ritual and personal observance, regarding Jewish Law as non-binding and the individual Jew as autonomous, and openness to external influences and progressive values. The origins of Reform Judaism lay in 19th-century Germany, where its early principles were formulated by Rabbi Abraham Geiger and his associates; since the 1970s, the movement adopted a policy of inclusiveness and acceptance, inviting as many as possible to partake in its communities, rather than strict theoretical clarity
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Karaite Judaism
Karaite Judaism or Karaism (also spelt Qaraite Judaism or Qaraism), (/ˈkærə.t/ or /ˈkærə.ɪzəm/; Hebrew: יהדות קראית, Modern Yahadut Qara'it from, Tiberian Qārāʾîm, meaning "Readers") is a Jewish religious movement characterized by the recognition of the Tanakh alone as its supreme authority in Halakha (Jewish religious law) and theology. It is distinct from mainstream Rabbinic Judaism, which considers the Oral Torah, as codified in the Talmud and subsequent works, to be authoritative interpretations of the Torah. Karaites maintain that all of the divine commandments handed down to Moses by God were recorded in the written Torah without additional Oral Law or explanation
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Reconstructionist Judaism
Reconstructionist Judaism (Hebrew: יהדות רקונסטרוקציוניסטית‬, yahadút rekonstruktsyonistit, or יהדות מתחדשת‬, yahadút mitkhadéshet) is a modern Jewish movement that views Judaism as a progressively evolving civilization and is based on the conceptions developed by Mordecai Kaplan (1881–1983). The movement originated as a semi-organized stream within Conservative Judaism and developed from the late 1920s to 1940s, before it seceded in 1955 and established a rabbinical college in 1967. There is substantial theological diversity within the movement. Halakha, the collective body of Jewish Law, is not considered binding, but is treated as a valuable cultural remnant that should be upheld unless there is reason for the contrary
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Jewish Renewal
Jewish Renewal (Hebrew: התחדשות יהודית‎, translit. hitchadeshut yehudit), is a recent movement in Judaism which endeavors to reinvigorate modern Judaism with Kabbalistic, Hasidic, and musical practices
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Humanistic Judaism
Humanistic Judaism (Hebrew: יהדות הומניסטיתYahdut Humanistit) is a Jewish movement that offers a nontheistic alternative in contemporary Jewish life
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Haymanot
Haymanot (Ge'ez: ሃይማኖት) is the branch of Judaism practiced by the Beta Israel, also known as Ethiopian Jews. Haymanot in both Ge'ez and Amharic means "religion" or "faith". Thus in modern Amharic, it is common to speak of the Christian Haymanot, the Jewish Haymanot or the Muslim Haymanot
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Jewish Philosophy
Jewish philosophy (Hebrew: פילוסופיה יהודית‎) includes all philosophy carried out by Jews, or in relation to the religion of Judaism. Until modern Haskalah (Jewish Enlightenment) and Jewish emancipation, Jewish philosophy was preoccupied with attempts to reconcile coherent new ideas into the tradition of Rabbinic Judaism"> Rabbinic Judaism, thus organizing emergent ideas that are not necessarily Jewish into a uniquely Jewish scholastic framework and world-view. With their acceptance into modern society, Jews with secular educations embraced or developed entirely new philosophies to meet the demands of the world in which they now found themselves. Medieval re-discovery of ancient Greek philosophy among the Geonim of 10th century Babylonian academies brought rationalist philosophy into Biblical-Talmudic Judaism. The philosophy was generally in competition with Kabbalah
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Jewish Principles Of Faith
There is no established formulation of principles of faith that are recognized by all branches of Judaism. Central authority in Judaism is not vested in any one person or group - although the Sanhedrin, the supreme Jewish religious court, would fulfill this role when it is re-established - but rather in Judaism's sacred writings, laws, and traditions. The various principles of faith that have been enumerated over the centuries carry no weight other than that imparted to them by the fame and scholarship of their respective authors. Judaism affirms the existence and uniqueness of God and stresses performance of deeds or commandments alongside adherence to a strict belief system
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Messiah In Judaism
In Judaism, messiah (Hebrew: מָשִׁיחַ‎, translit. māšîaḥ; Greek: χριστός, translit. khristós, lit. 'anointed, covered in oil') is a title for a savior and liberator of the Jewish people
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Orthodox Judaism
Orthodox Judaism is the branch of religious Judaism which subscribes to a tradition of mass revelation, and adheres to the interpretation and application of the laws and ethics of the Torah, as legislated in the Talmudic texts by the Tannaim and Amoraim
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Jewish Ethics
Jewish ethics is the moral philosophy particular to one or both of the Ethics in religion"> Jewish religion and peoples. Serving as a convergence of Judaism and the Western philosophical tradition of ethics, the diverse literature of Jewish ethics's broad range of moral concern classifies it as a type of normative ethics. For two millennia, Jewish thought has focussed on the interplay of ethics with the rule of law. The tradition of rabbinic religious law - Halakhah - addresses several problems associated with ethics, including its semi-permeable relation with duties that are usually not punished under law