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Ćevapi
Ćevapi
Ćevapi
(pronounced [tɕɛv̞ǎːpi]) or ćevapčići (formal diminutive, [tɕɛv̞ǎptʃitɕi], ћевапчићи) is a grilled dish of minced meat, a type of skinless sausage, found traditionally in the countries of southeastern Europe (the Balkans). They are considered a national dish in Bosnia and Herzegovina[1] and Serbia[2][3][4] and are also common in Croatia, Kosovo, Montenegro, Albania, Slovenia, as well as in Republic of Macedonia, Bulgaria, Romania. Ćevapi
Ćevapi
has its origins in the Balkans
Balkans
during the Ottoman period, and represents a regional speciality similar to the köfte kebab. They are usually served of 5–10 pieces on a plate or in a flatbread (lepinje or somun), often with chopped onions, sour cream, kajmak, ajvar, feta cheese, minced red pepper and salt
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Somun
Bread
Bread
is a staple food prepared from a dough of flour and water, usually by baking. Throughout recorded history it has been popular around the world and is one of the oldest artificial foods, having been of importance since the dawn of agriculture. Proportions of types of flour and other ingredients vary widely, as do modes of preparation. As a result, types, shapes, sizes, and textures of breads differ around the world. Bread
Bread
may be leavened by processes such as reliance on naturally occurring sourdough microbes, chemicals, industrially produced yeast, or high-pressure aeration. Some bread is cooked before it can leaven, including for traditional or religious reasons. Non-cereal ingredients such as fruits, nuts and fats may be included
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Macedonian Language
Macedonian (/ˌmæsɪˈdoʊniən/; македонски, tr. makedonski, pronounced [maˈkɛdɔnski ˈjazik] ( listen)) is a South Slavic language spoken as a first language by around two million people, principally in the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and the Macedonian diaspora, with a smaller number of speakers throughout the transnational region of Macedonia. It is the official language of the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and a recognized minority language in parts of Albania, Romania
Romania
and Serbia. Standard Macedonian was implemented as the official language of the Socialist Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
in 1945[8] and has since developed a modern literature
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Main Course
The main course is the featured or primary dish in a meal consisting of several courses. It usually follows the entrée ("entry") course.Contents1 Usage 2 Serving 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksUsage[edit] In the United States and Canada (except Quebec), the main course may be called "entrée".[1][2][3][4] English-speaking Québécois follow the French use of the term. According to linguist Dan Jurafsky, North American usage ("entrée") retains the original French meaning of a substantial meat course.[5]A sirloin steak dinner. This may be the main course of a meal.Serving[edit] The main dish is usually the heaviest, heartiest, and most complex or substantial dish on a menu. The main ingredient is usually meat, fish or another protein source. It is most often preceded by an appetizer, soup or salad, and followed by a dessert
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Sour Cream
Sour cream
Sour cream
is a dairy product obtained by fermenting regular cream with certain kinds of lactic acid bacteria.[1] The bacterial culture, which is introduced either deliberately or naturally, sours and thickens the cream. Its name comes from the production of lactic acid by bacterial fermentation, which is called souring.Contents1 Traditional 2 Commercial varieties 3 Physical-chemical properties3.1 Ingredients 3.2 Protein composition 3.3 Processing 3.4 Physical-chemical changes 3.5 Rheological properties4 Uses 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksTraditional[edit] Traditionally, sour cream was made by letting cream that was skimmed off the top of milk ferment at a moderate temperature
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Feta Cheese
Feta
Feta
(Greek: φέτα, féta, "slice") is a brined curd white cheese made in Greece
Greece
from sheep's milk or from a mixture of sheep and goat's milk. Similar brined white cheeses are often made partly or wholly of cow's milk, and they are sometimes also called feta. It is a crumbly aged cheese, commonly produced in blocks, and has a slightly grainy texture. Feta
Feta
is used as a table cheese, as well as in salads (e.g. the Greek salad) and pastries. Most notable is its use in the popular phyllo-based dishes spanakopita ("spinach pie") and tyropita ("cheese pie"), or served with some olive oil or olives and sprinkled with aromatic herbs such as oregano. It can also be served cooked or grilled, as part of a sandwich, in omelettes, or as a salty alternative to other cheeses in a variety of dishes. Since 2002, feta has been a protected designation of origin product in the European Union
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South Slavic Languages
The South Slavic languages
Slavic languages
are one of three branches of the Slavic languages. There are approximately 30 million speakers, mainly in the Balkans. These are separated geographically from speakers of the other two Slavic branches (West and East) by a belt of German, Hungarian and Romanian speakers. The first South Slavic language to be written (the first attested Slavic language) was the variety spoken in Thessaloniki, now called Old Church Slavonic, in the ninth century
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Albanian Language
Latin
Latin
(Albanian alphabet) Albanian Braille Greek (Arvanitika)Official statusOfficial language in Albania  Kosovo[a]  Macedonia (partly)[2]Recognised minority language in Italy  Montenegro  Serbia  Croatia  RomaniaRegulated by Officially by the Social Sciences and Albanological Section of the Academy of Sciences of AlbaniaLanguage codesISO 639-1 sqISO 639-2 alb (B) sqi (T)ISO 639-3 sqi – inclusive code Individual codes: aae – Arbëresh aat – Arvanitika aln – Gheg als – ToskGlottolog alba1267[3]Linguasphere 55-AAA-aaa to 55-AAA-ahe (25 varieties) Albanian dialects
Albanian dialects
(The map does not indicate where the language is majority or minority).This article contains IPA phonetic symbols
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Croatian Language
Croatian /kroʊˈeɪʃən/ ( listen) (hrvatski [xř̩ʋaːtskiː]) is the standardized variety of the Serbo-Croatian language[6][7][8] used by Croats,[9] principally in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Serbian province of Vojvodina
Vojvodina
and other neighboring countries. It is the official and literary standard of Croatia
Croatia
and one of the official languages of the European Union. Croatian is also one of the official languages of Bosnia and Herzegovina, a recognized minority language in Serbia, and neighboring countries. Standard Croatian is based on the most widespread dialect of Serbo-Croatian, Shtokavian, more specifically on Eastern Herzegovinian, which is also the basis of Standard Serbian, Bosnian, and Montenegrin
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Slovene Language
Slovene (/ˈsloʊviːn/ ( listen) or /sloʊˈviːn, slə-/[7]) or Slovenian (/sloʊˈviːniən, slə-/ ( listen);[8][9] slovenski jezik or slovenščina) belongs to the group of South Slavic languages. It is spoken by approximately 2.5 million speakers worldwide, the majority of whom live in Slovenia
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Serbian Language
Serbian (српски / srpski, pronounced [sr̩̂pskiː]) is the standardized variety of the Serbo-Croatian
Serbo-Croatian
language mainly used by Serbs.[8][9][10] It is the official language of Serbia, the territory of Kosovo, and one of the three official languages of Bosnia and Herzegovina
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Bulgarian Language
 Moldova  Ukraine  Serbia  Albania  RomaniaRegulated by Institute for the Bulgarian language
Bulgarian language
at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Институт за български език при Българската академия на науките (БАН))Language codesISO 639-1 bgISO 639-2 bulISO 639-3 bulGlottolog bulg1262[7]Linguasphere 53-AAA-hb < 53-AAA-hThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Köfte Kebab
A skewer is a thin metal or wood stick used to hold pieces of food together.[1] The word may sometimes be used as a metonym, to refer to the entire food item served on a skewer, as in "chicken skewers". Skewers are used while grilling or roasting meats and fish, and in other culinary applications. In English, brochette is a borrowing of the French word for skewer. In cookery, en brochette means 'on a skewer', and describes the form of a dish or the method of cooking and serving pieces of food, especially grilled meat or seafood, on skewers; for example "lamb cubes en brochette".[2] Skewers are often used for kebab dishes originating in Middle East and Muslim cultures.Contents1 Utensil 2 History 3 Examples of skewered foods3.1 Kebab 3.2 Other4 See also 5 ReferencesUtensil[edit] Metal skewers are typically stainless steel rods with a pointed tip on one end and a grip of some kind on the other end for ease of removing the food
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Kebapche
Kebapche
Kebapche
(Bulgarian: кебапче, plural кебапчета, kebapcheta) is a Bulgarian dish of grilled minced meat with spices. The meat is shaped into an elongated cylindrical form, similar to a hot dog. Typically, a mix of pork and beef is used, although some recipes involve only pork. The preferred spices are black pepper, cumin and salt. Kebapche
Kebapche
is a grilled food. It is never fried or baked. A typical addition to a kebapche meal are chips (French fries), often covered with grated sirene (fresh white cheese similar to feta); lyutenitsa is sometimes used as a dip. The expression a three kebapcheta with sides (тройка кебапчета с гарнитура, troika kebapcheta s garnitura) is particularly well-known. The preferred drink to go with a kebapche is beer. The word kebapche is derived from kebab, –che is a diminutive Bulgarian neutral suffix, i.e. a "little kebab"
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Czech Language
Czech (/tʃɛk/; čeština Czech pronunciation: [ˈtʃɛʃcɪna]), historically also Bohemian[6] (/boʊˈhiːmiən, bə-/;[7] lingua Bohemica in Latin), is a West Slavic language
West Slavic language
of the Czech–Slovak group.[6] Spoken by over 10 million people, it serves as the official language of the Czech Republic. Czech is closely related to Slovak, to the point of mutual intelligibility to a very high degree.[8] Like other Slavic languages, Czech is a fusional language with a rich system of morphology and relatively flexible word order. Its vocabulary has been extensively influenced by Latin[9] and German.[10] The Czech–Slovak group developed within West Slavic
West Slavic
in the high medieval period, and the standardization of Czech and Slovak within the Czech–Slovak dialect continuum emerged in the early modern period
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Hajduks
A hajduk is a type of peasant irregular infantry found in Central and Southeast Europe
Southeast Europe
from the early 17th to mid 19th centuries. They have reputations ranging from bandits to freedom fighters depending on time, place, and their enemies. In the European lands of the Ottoman Empire, the term hajduk was used to describe bandits and brigands of the Balkans, while in Central Europe for the West Slavs, Hungarians, and Germans
Germans
it was used to refer to outlaws who protected Christians against provocative actions by the Ottomans. In the 17th century they were firmly established in the Ottoman Balkans, related to increased taxes, Christian victories against the Ottomans, and general security decline. Hajduk
Hajduk
bands predominantly numbered one hundred men each, with a firm hierarchy under one leader
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