HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Íslendingabók
Íslendingabók (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈistlɛntiŋkaˌpouk], Old Norse pronunciation: [ˈiːslɛndɪŋgaˌboːk], Book of Icelanders; Latin: Libellus Islandorum) is a historical work dealing with early Icelandic history. The author was an Icelandic priest, Ari Þorgilsson, working in the early 12th century. The work originally existed in two different versions but only the younger one has survived. The older contained information on Norwegian kings, made use of by later writers of kings' sagas. The priest Jón Erlendsson in Villingaholt (died 1672) in the service of bishop Brynjólfur Sveinsson
Brynjólfur Sveinsson
made two copies of Íslendingabók (now AM 113 a fol and AM 113 b fol at the Árni Magnússon
Árni Magnússon
Institute for Icelandic Studies), the latter one because the bishop was unhappy with the first version. The original copied from is assumed to have dated to ca. 1200
[...More...]

"Íslendingabók" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Norse Religion
Old Norse
Old Norse
religion developed from early Germanic religion during the Proto-Norse period, when the North Germanic peoples
North Germanic peoples
separated into a distinct branch of the Germanic peoples. It was displaced by Christianization
Christianization
of the North Germanic peoples. Scholars reconstruct aspects of North Germanic religion by historical linguistics, archaeology, toponymy, and records left by North Germanic peoples, such as runic inscriptions in the Younger Futhark, a distinctly North Germanic extension of the runic alphabet. Numerous Old Norse
Old Norse
works dated to the 13th century record Norse mythology, a component of North Germanic religion. Old Norse
Old Norse
religion was polytheistic, entailing a belief in various gods and goddesses
[...More...]

"Norse Religion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
[...More...]

"Ireland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

DeCODE Genetics
deCODE genetics, Inc. (Icelandic: Íslensk erfðagreining) is a biopharmaceutical company based in Reykjavík, Iceland. The company was founded in 1996 by Kári Stefánsson[1] to identify human genes associated with common diseases using population studies, and apply the knowledge gained to guide the development of candidate drugs
[...More...]

"DeCODE Genetics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Kári Stefánsson
Kári Stefánsson, (b. 1949, Iceland) is an Icelandic neurologist, who is the President, Chairman, CEO and co-founder of deCODE Genetics. He has pioneered the monitoring of the DNA of a large fraction of an entire country's population leading to a complete genealogy of its native inhabitants. This has led to the discovery of the neuregulin-1 gene's association with schizophrenia.Contents1 Education and early career 2 Family 3 At DeCode Genetics 4 Appearances in popular culture 5 ReferencesEducation and early career[edit] Kári Stefánsson was born in 1949 in Iceland.[1] He received his M.D. in 1976 and his Dr. med.
Dr. med.
in 1986 from the University of Iceland. He went to the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
and trained in neurology, neuropathology, and neurosciences and served on the faculty there for 10 years, from 1983 until 1993
[...More...]

"Kári Stefánsson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Langfedgatal
The Langfeðgatal[1] (Old Norse pronunciation: [ˈlaŋgˌfɛðgaˌtʰal], Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈlauŋkˌfɛðkaˌtʰaːl̥]) is a 12th-century Icelandic genealogy of Scandinavian kings. The text of the Icelandic Langfeðgatal can be found in AM 415.[2] Jacob Langbek published the text and a translation into Latin in the first volume of Scriptores Rerum Danicarum Medii Ævi, published in 1772.[3] Raymond Wilson Chambers suggested that the Langfeðgatal, along with Textus Roffensis, the Ættartölur and the "West Saxon Regnal List from 494 to Reign of Æthelred" were influenced by a common Anglo-Saxon archetypal genealogy that existed around 970 CE.[4] Alexander M. Bruce has discussed the Langfeðgatal in a study of Scyld and Scef comparing it with Anglo-Saxon royal genealogies. He noted a difference in the primary branch in that the first name in the genealogy is that of Noah, followed by his son Japheth
[...More...]

"Langfedgatal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Lögberg
Lögberg, or Law Rock, was a rocky outcrop in south west Iceland, at the location for the assembly of the country's Althing parliament. The original Althing was gathered at Þingvellir,[1] an area of dramatic landscapes which was easily accessible from the populated areas of the south west.[2]Alþingi Lögberg aerial panorama, taken in June 2017The exact location of the Lögberg is unknown, because of the changing geography of the rift valley over 1000 years.[3] Two possible locations have been identified in Þingvellir, one a flat ledge at the top of a slope named Hallurinn (currently marked by a flagpole), the other in the Almannagjá fault against a rock wall.[1] A site in the Hestagjá ravine has been put forward as ideal.[2] The Lögberg was the place on which the Lawspeaker (lögsögumaður) took his seat as the presiding official of the assembly of the Althing
[...More...]

"Lögberg" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Olaf I Of Norway
Olaf Tryggvason
Olaf Tryggvason
(960s – 9 September 1000) was King of Norway
Norway
from 995 to 1000. He was the son of Tryggvi Olafsson, king of Viken (Vingulmark, and Rånrike), and, according to later sagas, the great-grandson of Harald Fairhair, first King of Norway. Olaf had an important part in the conversion of the Norse to Christianity, often by compulsion.[2][3][4] He is said to have built the first Christian church in Norway, in 995, and to have founded the city of Trondheim
Trondheim
in 997. A statue of Olaf Tryggvason
Olaf Tryggvason
is located in the city's central plaza. Historical information on Olaf is sparse. He is mentioned in some contemporary English sources,[5] and some skaldic poems. The oldest narrative source mentioning him briefly is Adam of Bremen's Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum of circa 1070
[...More...]

"Olaf I Of Norway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Greenland
Greenland
Greenland
(Greenlandic: Kalaallit
Kalaallit
Nunaat, pronounced [kalaːɬit nunaːt]; Danish: Grønland, pronounced [ˈɡʁɶnˌlanˀ]) is an autonomous constituent country within the Kingdom of Denmark
Kingdom of Denmark
between the Arctic
Arctic
and Atlantic Oceans, east of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago
[...More...]

"Greenland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Thing (assembly)
A thing /θɪŋ/, also known as Alþing, was the governing assembly of a northern Germanic society, made up of the free people of the community presided over by lawspeakers
[...More...]

"Thing (assembly)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Þingvellir
Þingvellir (Icelandic: [ˈθiŋkˌvɛtlɪr̥] ( listen)), anglicised as Thingvellir,[Note 1] is a national park in the municipality of Bláskógabyggð
Bláskógabyggð
in southwestern Iceland, about 40 km northeast of Iceland's capital, Reykjavík. Þingvellir
Þingvellir
is a site of historical, cultural, and geological significance, and is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Iceland. The park lies in a rift valley that marks the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge
Mid-Atlantic Ridge
and the boundary between the North American tectonic plate and the Eurasian. To its south lies Þingvallavatn, the largest natural lake in Iceland.[2] Þingvellir
Þingvellir
is associated with the Althing, the national parliament of Iceland, which was established at the site in 930 AD
[...More...]

"Þingvellir" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Althing
Coalition government (35)     Independence Party (16)      Left-Green Movement
Left-Green Movement
(11)      Progressive Party (8)Opposition parties (28)     Social Democratic Alliance
Social Democratic Alliance
(7)      Centre Party (7)      Pirate Party (6)      People's Party (4)      Reform Party (4)ElectionsVoting systemParty-list proportional representationLast election28 October 2017Meeting placeAlþingishúsið Austurvöllur 150 Reykjavík IcelandWebsitewww.althingi.isIcelandThis article is part of a series on the politics and government of IcelandConstitutionInstitutions ExecutivePresidentGuðni Th
[...More...]

"Althing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

IPA
The International
International
Phonetic Alphabet
Alphabet
(IPA) is an alphabetic system of phonetic notation based primarily on the Latin alphabet
[...More...]

"IPA" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Monk
A monk (/mʌŋk/, from Greek: μοναχός, monachos, "single, solitary" and Latin
Latin
monachus[1]) is a person who practices religious asceticism by monastic living, either alone or with any number of other monks. A monk may be a person who decides to dedicate his life to serving all other living beings, or to be an ascetic who voluntarily chooses to leave mainstream society and live his or her life in prayer and contemplation. The concept is ancient and can be seen in many religions and in philosophy. In the Greek language
Greek language
the term can apply to women, but in modern English it is mainly in use for men. The word nun is typically used for female monastics. Although the term monachos is of Christian
Christian
origin, in the English language monk tends to be used loosely also for both male and female ascetics from other religious or philosophical backgrounds
[...More...]

"Monk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Finnur Jónsson
Finnur Jónsson
Finnur Jónsson
(May 29, 1858 – March 30, 1934) was an Icelandic philologist and Professor of Nordic Philology at the University of Copenhagen. He made extensive contributions to the study of Old Norse literature. [1] Finnur Jónsson
Finnur Jónsson
was born at Akureyri
Akureyri
in northern Iceland. He graduated from Menntaskólinn í Reykjavík
Menntaskólinn í Reykjavík
in 1878 and went to Denmark for further studies at the University of Copenhagen. He received a doctorate in philology in 1884 with a dissertation on skaldic poetry. He became a docent at the University in 1887 and a professor in 1898, serving until 1928. After retiring he continued work on his subject with new publications until the year he died. [2] Finnur's principal area of study was Old Norse poetry
[...More...]

"Finnur Jónsson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.