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Érimón
Érimón,[1] (modern spelling: Éiremhón) son of Míl Espáine (and great-grandson of Breoghan, king of Celtic Galicia), according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, was one of the chieftains who took part in the Milesian invasion of Ireland, which conquered the island from the Tuatha Dé Danann, and one of the first Milesian High Kings. Before coming to Ireland, he and his older brother Éber Donn
Donn
were joint rulers of Spain. His great-uncle Íth
Íth
made a peaceful expedition to Ireland, which he had seen from the top of a tower built by his father Breogan, but was killed by the three kings of the Tuatha Dé Danann, Mac Cuill, Mac Cecht and Mac Gréine, and in revenge the Milesians invaded in force, with Érimón and Éber Donn
Donn
in command. They defeated the Tuatha Dé Danann
Tuatha Dé Danann
in the Battle of Tailtiu
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Lugaid
Lugaid (Lughaid, Lughaidh) is a popular medieval Irish name, thought to be derived from the god Lug. It is borne by a number of figures from Irish history and mythology, including:Contents1 High Kings of Ireland 2 Other historical figures 3 Saints 4 See also 5 ReferencesHigh Kings of Ireland[edit] Lugaid Íardonn, legendary High King of Ireland of the 9th century BC Lugaid Lámdearg, legendary High King of Ireland of the 9th century BC Lugaid Laigde, legendary High King of Ireland of the 8th century BC Lugaid Luaigne, legendary High King of Ireland of the 2nd century BC Lugaid Riab nDerg, legendary High King of Ireland of the 1st century BC Lugaid Mac Con, semi-legendary High King of Ireland of the 3rd century AD Lugaid mac Lóegairi (died c
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Georges Dumézil
Georges Dumézil
Georges Dumézil
(French: [dymezil]; 4 March 1898 – 11 October 1986, Paris) was a French comparative philologist best known for his analysis of sovereignty and power in Proto-Indo-European religion
Proto-Indo-European religion
and society. He is considered one of the major contributors to mythography, in particular for his formulation of the trifunctional hypothesis of social class in ancient societies.Contents1 Biography 2 Criticism 3 Works in English 4 Works 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit]Book signed by Georges Dumézil
Georges Dumézil
and offered to Maurice Halbwachs. Maurice Halbwachs
Maurice Halbwachs
Collection of Human and Social Sciences Library Paris Descartes-CNRSThis section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources
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Gallaecia
Gallaecia
Gallaecia
or Callaecia, also known as Hispania
Hispania
Gallaecia, was the name of a Roman province
Roman province
in the north-west of Hispania, approximately present-day Galicia, northern Portugal, Asturias
Asturias
and Leon and the later Suebic Kingdom of Gallaecia
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Geoffrey Keating
Seathrún Céitinn (c. 1569 – c. 1644; known in English as Geoffrey Keating) was a 17th-century historian. He was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, and is buried in Tubrid
Tubrid
Graveyard in the parish of Ballylooby-Duhill, and became an Irish Catholic priest and a poet.Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] It was generally believed until recently that Keating had been born in Burgess, County Tipperary; indeed, a monument to Keating was raised beside the bridge at Burgess, in 1990; but Diarmuid Ó Murchadha writes,The presumption that [Keating] attended a bardic school at Burgess, Co. Tipperary, is attributable to Thomas O'Sullevane, a shadowy character from the fringes of literary circles in London
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Cruithne (people)
The Cruthin (Old Irish, Old Irish pronunciation: [ˈkɾˠʊθʲɪn̠ʲ]; Middle Irish: Cruithnig or Cruithni; Modern Irish: Cruithne [ˈkɾˠɪhn̠ʲə]) were a people of early medieval Ireland
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High King Of Ireland
The High Kings of Ireland
Ireland
(Irish: Ard- na hÉireann Irish pronunciation: [ˈa:ɾˠd̪ˠˌɾˠiː n̪ˠə ˈheːrʲən̪ˠ]) were sometimes historical and sometimes legendary figures who had, or who are claimed to have had, lordship over the whole of Ireland. Medieval and early modern Irish literature portrays an almost unbroken sequence of High Kings, ruling from the Hill of Tara
Hill of Tara
over a hierarchy of lesser kings, stretching back thousands of years
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Ulster
Patron Saints: Finnian of Moville[1] Columba a. ^ The Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
Statistics and Research Agency[2] for 2011 combined with the preliminary results of Census of Ireland 2011 for Ulster
Ulster
(part of).[3] b. ^ Ulster
Ulster
contains all of the Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
constituency (3 MEPs) as well as part of the Midlands–North-West constituency (4 MEPs); the counties of Cavan, Monaghan and Donegal contain 17.5% of the population of this constituency.[4] Ulster
Ulster
(/ˈʌlstər/; Irish: Ulaidh pronounced [ˈul̪ˠəi] or Cúige Uladh pronounced [ˈkuːɟə ˈul̪ˠə], Ulster
Ulster
Scots: Ulstèr[5][6][7] or Ulster)[8][9][10] is a former province in the north of the island of Ireland
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Iberian Peninsula
The Iberian Peninsula
Peninsula
/aɪˈbɪəriən pəˈnɪnsjʊlə/,[a] also known as Iberia /aɪˈbɪəriə/,[b] is located in the southwest corner of Europe. The peninsula is principally divided between Portugal
Portugal
and Spain, comprising most of their territory. It also includes Andorra, and a small part of France
France
along the peninsula's northeastern edge, as well as Gibraltar
Gibraltar
on its south coast, a small peninsula that forms an overseas territory of the United Kingdom
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Connacht
Patron Saint: Ciarán of Clonmacnoise[3] a. ^ Connacht
Connacht
is part of the Midlands–North-West constituency; the five Connacht
Connacht
counties contain 32.7% of the population of this constituency.[4]Connacht[1] /ˈkɒnɔːxt/ or Connaught (Irish: Connacht[1] or Cúige Chonnacht) is one of the provinces of Ireland, situated in the west of the country. Up to the 9th century it consisted of several independent major kingdoms (Lúighne, Uí Maine, and Iarthar Connacht). Between the reigns of Conchobar mac Taidg Mór (died 882) and his descendant, Aedh mac Ruaidri Ó Conchobair (reigned 1228–33), it became a kingdom under the rule of the Uí Briúin
Uí Briúin
Aí dynasty, whose ruling sept adopted the surname Ua Conchobair
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List Of Celtic Deities
The Celtic pantheon
Celtic pantheon
is known from a variety of sources such as written Celtic mythology, ancient places of worship, statues, engravings, religious objects, and place or personal names. The Celtic pantheon has over 1,200 named deities; a comprehensive list is difficult to assemble. Celtic deities
Celtic deities
can belong to two categories: general deities and local deities. "General deities" were known by Celts
Celts
throughout large regions, and are the gods and goddesses invoked for protection, healing, luck, and honour. The "local deities" that embodied Celtic nature worship were the spirits of a particular feature of the landscape, such as mountains, trees, or rivers, and thus were generally only known by the locals in the surrounding areas.[1] After Celtic lands became Christianised, there were attempts by Christian writers to euhemerize or even demonize the pre-Christian deities
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Munster
Patron Saint: Ailbe
Ailbe
of Emly[3] a. ^ Munster
Munster
is part of the South constituency; the six Munster counties contain 74.1% of the population of this constituency.[4] Munster
Munster
(Irish: an Mhumhain / Cúige Mumhan, pronounced [ə ˈvuːnʲ], [ˌkuːgʲə ˈmuːn]) is one of the provinces of Ireland situated in the south of Ireland. In early Ireland, the Kingdom of Munster
Munster
was one of the kingdoms of Gaelic Ireland
Gaelic Ireland
ruled by a "king of over-kings" Irish: rí ruirech. Following the Norman invasion of Ireland, the ancient kingdoms were shired into counties for administrative and judicial purposes. In later centuries, local government legislation has seen further sub-division of the historic counties. Munster
Munster
has no official function for local government purposes
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Fir Domnann
The Fir Domnann were a people named in Irish legendary history. The name Fir Domnann is based on the root dumno-, which means both ‘deep’ and ‘the world’. The suffix -on- often occurs in Gaulish and British divine names
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Leinster
Patron Saint: Brigid[3] a. ^ Leinster
Leinster
contains the entirety of the Dublin
Dublin
constituency and parts of the South and Midlands–North-West constituencies; Leinster contains 49.8% of the population of the Midlands–North-West constituency and 25.9% of the population of the South constituency.[4] Leinster
Leinster
(/ˈlɛnstər/ — Irish: Laighin / Cúige Laighean — pronounced [ˈl̪ˠaːjɪnʲ] / [ˈkuːɟə ˈl̪ˠaːjɪnˠ]) is one of the Provinces of Ireland
Provinces of Ireland
situated in the east of Ireland. It comprises the ancient Kingdoms of Mide, Osraige and Leinster. Following the 12th-century Norman invasion of Ireland, the historic fifths of Leinster
Leinster
and Mide gradually merged, mainly due to the impact of the Pale, which straddled both, thereby forming the present-day province of Leinster
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O'Regan
O'Regan can refer to:O'Regan's, Newfoundland and Labrador, a village in Newfoundland, Canada Anthony O'Regan, a Catholic bishop Denis O'Regan, a renowned photographer J. Kevin O'Regan, a psychologist interested in phenomenal consciousness Kate O'Regan, a South African lawyer and judge Katherine O'Regan, a former New Zealand politician Mark O'Regan, a New Zealand judge Michael O'Regan, co-founder of Research Machines Seamus O'Regan, a Canadian broadcast journalist Tarik O'Regan, a British composer Brian O'Regan (chemist), American chemist co-inventor of Dye-sensitised solar cells Brian O'Regan (Gaelic footballer), Gaelic footballer Daniel O'Regan, New Zealand rugby league player Danny O'Regan, American ice hockey playerThis page lists people with the surname O'Regan
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Old Irish Language
Old Irish (Old Irish: Goídelc; Irish: Sean-Ghaeilge; Scottish Gaelic: Seann Ghàidhlig; Manx: Shenn Yernish; sometimes called Old Gaelic[2][3]) is the name given to the oldest form of the Goidelic languages for which extensive written texts are extant. It was used from c.600 to c.900. The primary contemporary texts are dated c.700–850; by 900 the language had already transitioned into early Middle Irish. Some Old Irish texts date from the 10th century, although these are presumably copies of texts composed at an earlier time period. Old Irish is thus the ancestor of Modern Irish, Manx, and Scottish Gaelic.[2] Old Irish is known for having a particularly complex system of morphology and especially of allomorphy (more or less unpredictable variations in stems and suffixes in differing circumstances) as well as a complex sound system involving grammatically significant consonant mutations to the initial consonant of a word
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