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Électricité De France
Électricité de France
Électricité de France
S.A. (EDF; Electricity of France) is a French electric utility company, largely owned by the French state. Headquartered in Paris, with €71.2 billion in revenues in 2016, EDF operates a diverse portfolio of 120+ gigawatts of generation capacity in Europe, South America, North America, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. In 2009, EDF was the world's largest producer of electricity.[5] In 2011, it produced 22% of the European Union's electricity, primarily from nuclear power:nuclear: 64.3%; renewable energy: 12.3% (includes 4.6% hydroelectricity); gas: 8.6%; coal: 14.5%; other: 0.3%.[6]Its 58 active nuclear reactors (in France) are spread out over 20 sites (nuclear power plants)
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Solar Energy
Solar energy
Solar energy
is radiant light and heat from the Sun
Sun
that is harnessed using a range of ever-evolving technologies such as solar heating, photovoltaics, solar thermal energy, solar architecture, molten salt power plants and artificial photosynthesis.[1][2] It is an important source of renewable energy and its technologies are broadly characterized as either passive solar or active solar depending on how they capture and distribute solar energy or convert it into solar power. Active solar
Active solar
techniques include the use of photovoltaic systems, concentrated solar power and solar water heating to harness the energy
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Nuclear Power
2012 World [civil] electricity generation by fuels (IEA, 2014)[4]   Coal/Peat (40.4%)   Natural Gas (22.5%)   Hydro (16.2%)    Nuclear fission
Nuclear fission
(10.9%)   Oil (5.0%)   Others (Renew.) (5.0%) Nuclear power
Nuclear power
is the use of nuclear reactions that release nuclear energy[5] to generate heat, which most frequently is then used in steam turbines to produce electricity in a nuclear power plant. The term includes nuclear fission, nuclear decay and nuclear fusion. Presently, the nuclear fission of elements in the actinide series of the periodic table produce the vast majority of nuclear energy in the direct service of humankind, with nuclear decay processes, primarily in the form of geothermal energy, and radioisotope thermoelectric generators, in niche uses making up the rest
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Nuclear Reactors
A nuclear reactor, formerly known as an atomic pile, is a device used to initiate and control a sustained nuclear chain reaction. Nuclear reactors are used at nuclear power plants for electricity generation and in propulsion of ships. Heat from nuclear fission is passed to a working fluid (water or gas), which runs through steam turbines. These either drive a ship's propellers or turn electrical generators. Nuclear generated steam in principle can be used for industrial process heat or for district heating. Some reactors are used to produce isotopes for medical and industrial use, or for production of weapons-grade plutonium. Some are run only for research
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S.A. (corporation)
S.A. (and variants) designates a type of corporation in countries that mostly employ civil law. Depending on language, it means anonymous company, anonymous partnership, or share company, roughly equivalent to public limited company in common law jurisdictions. It is different from partnerships and private limited companies. Originally, shareholders could be literally anonymous and collect dividends by surrendering coupons attached to their share certificates. Dividends were therefore paid to whomever held the certificate. Share certificates could be transferred privately, and therefore the management of the company would not necessarily know who owned its shares. Like bearer bonds, anonymous, illegal unregistered share ownership and dividend collection enabled money laundering, tax evasion, and concealed business transactions in general, so governments passed laws to audit the practice
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MWe
The watt (symbol: W) is a unit of power. In the International System of Units (SI) it is defined as a derived unit of 1 joule per second,[1] and is used to quantify the rate of energy transfer
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Pressurized Water Reactor
Pressurized water reactors (PWRs) constitute the large majority of the world's nuclear power plants (notable exceptions being the United Kingdom, Japan, and Canada) and are one of three types of light water reactor (LWR), the other types being boiling water reactors (BWRs) and supercritical water reactors (SCWRs). In a PWR, the primary coolant (water) is pumped under high pressure to the reactor core where it is heated by the energy released by the fission of atoms. The heated water then flows to a steam generator where it transfers its thermal energy to a secondary system where steam is generated and flows to turbines which, in turn, spin an electric generator. In contrast to a boiling water reactor, pressure in the primary coolant loop prevents the water from boiling within the reactor
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Hydropower
Hydropower
Hydropower
or water power (from Greek: ύδωρ, "water") is power derived from the energy of falling water or fast running water, which may be harnessed for useful purposes. Since ancient times, hydropower from many kinds of watermills has been used as a renewable energy source for irrigation and the operation of various mechanical devices, such as gristmills, sawmills, textile mills, trip hammers, dock cranes, domestic lifts, and ore mills. A trompe, which produces compressed air from falling water, is sometimes used to power other machinery at a distance.[1][2] In the late 19th century, hydropower became a source for generating electricity. Cragside
Cragside
in Northumberland was the first house powered by hydroelectricity in 1878[3] and the first commercial hydroelectric power plant was built at Niagara Falls
Niagara Falls
in 1879
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Wind Power
Wind
Wind
power is the use of air flow through wind turbines to mechanically power generators for electric power. Wind
Wind
power, as an alternative to burning fossil fuels, is plentiful, renewable, widely distributed, clean, produces no greenhouse gas emissions during operation, consumes no water, and uses little land.[2] The net effects on the environment are far less problematic than those of nonrenewable power sources. Wind
Wind
farms consist of many individual wind turbines, which are connected to the electric power transmission network. Onshore wind is an inexpensive source of electric power, competitive with or in many places cheaper than coal or gas plants.[3][4][5] Offshore wind is steadier and stronger than on land, and offshore farms have less visual impact, but construction and maintenance costs are considerably higher
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Biomass
Biomass
Biomass
is an industry term for getting energy by burning wood, and other organic matter. Burning biomass releases carbon emissions, but has been classed as a renewable energy source in the EU and UN legal frameworks, because plant stocks can be replaced with new growth.[1] It has become popular among coal power stations, which switch from coal to biomass in order to convert to renewable energy generation without wasting existing generating plant and infrastructure. Biomass most often refers to plants or plant-based materials that are not used for food or feed, and are specifically called lignocellulosic biomass.[2] As an energy source, biomass can either be used directly via combustion to produce heat, or indirectly after converting it to various forms of biofuel. Conversion of biomass to biofuel can be achieved by different methods which are broadly classified into: thermal, chemical, and biochemical
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Gigawatts
The watt (symbol: W) is a unit of power. In the International System of Units (SI) it is defined as a derived unit of 1 joule per second,[1] and is used to quantify the rate of energy transfer
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Geothermal Energy
Geothermal energy
Geothermal energy
is thermal energy generated and stored in the Earth. Thermal energy
Thermal energy
is the energy that determines the temperature of matter. The geothermal energy of the Earth's crust originates from the original formation of the planet and from radioactive decay of materials (in currently uncertain[1] but possibly roughly equal[2] proportions). The geothermal gradient, which is the difference in temperature between the core of the planet and its surface, drives a continuous conduction of thermal energy in the form of heat from the core to the surface
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Paris Aire Urbaine
The Paris
Paris
metropolitan area (French: aire urbaine de Paris, pronounced [ɛʁ yʁbɛn də paʁi]) is a statistical area that describes the reach of commuter movement to and from Paris, France
France
and its surrounding suburbs.Contents<
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La Défense
La Défense
La Défense
(French: [la de.fɑ̃s]) is a major business district, three kilometres west of the city limits of Paris
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Exelon
Exelon
Exelon
Corporation is an American Fortune 100
Fortune 100
energy company headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. It generates revenues of approximately $31.4 billion and employs approximately 34,000 people.[2] Exelon
Exelon
is the largest electric holding company in the United States
United States
by revenue, the largest regulated utility in the United States with approximately 10 million customers, and is also the largest operator of nuclear power plants in the United States.[3] It was created in October 2000 by the merger of PECO Energy Company and Unicom Corp, which supplied energy to Philadelphia and Chicago respectively. Unicom owned Commonwealth Edison. Exelon
Exelon
operates regulated utilities in Illinois, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, and Washington, DC
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