HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Áed Sláine
Áed mac Diarmato (died 604), called Áed Sláine (Áed of Slane), was the son of Diarmait mac Cerbaill. Legendary stories exist of Áed's birth. Saint Columba
Columba
is said to have prophesied his death. His descendants, the Síl nÁedo Sláine—the seed of Áed of Slane—were prominent in 7th and early 8th century Ireland. Origins[edit] Main article: Diarmait mac Cerbaill Áed's mother is said to have been Mugain Mór, perhaps an euhemerisation of a Munster
Munster
sovereignty goddess. This Mugain is called the daughter of Conchrad mac Duach, the king of Osraige
[...More...]

"Áed Sláine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Brandub Mac Echach
Brandub mac Echach (died 605) was an Irish king of the Uí Cheinnselaig of Leinster. His father, Echu mac Muiredaig had been a king of the Ui Cheinnselaig. They belonged to a branch known as the Uí Felmeda descended from Fedelmid, son of Énnae Cennsalach. His son Óengus, grandson Muiredach, and great-grandson Eochu were all kings of the Uí Cheinnselaig.[1] According to the Book of Leinster, Brandub succeeded Áed Cerr mac Colmáin Már (died 595) of the Uí Dúnlainge as king of Leinster (actually Áed Dibchine mac Senaig of the Uí Máil)[2]Contents1 Birth saga 2 Defence of Leinster 3 Descendants 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBirth saga[edit] In the Rawlinson B 502 manuscript, dated to c. 1130, is the poem Gein Branduib maic Echach ocus Aedáin maic Gabráin (The Birth of Brandub son of Eochu and of Aedán son of Gabrán)
[...More...]

"Brandub Mac Echach" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Diarmait Mac Áedo Sláine
Sláine or Slaine is an Irish given name. Notable persons and characters with this name include: Sláine ingen Briain (fl. 1014), daughter of Brian Boru and wife of Sigtrygg, king of Dublin Slaine Ní Conmara, a Gaelic-Irish Lady who died in 1498 Sláine mac Dela of the Fir Bolg, the first legendary High King of Ireland Slaine Kelly (born 1982), Irish actress Sláine (comics), comic book hero inspired by Celtic mythologySláine: The Roleplaying Game of Celtic Heroes, role-playing game based on the settingSlaine (rapper), hiphop MC from BostonThis page or section lists people that share the same given name
[...More...]

"Diarmait Mac Áedo Sláine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Óengus Mac Colmáin
In Irish mythology, Aengus
Aengus
(Old Irish: Oíngus, Óengus) is a member of the Tuatha Dé Danann
Tuatha Dé Danann
and probably a god of love, youth and poetic inspiration. He is traditionally described as having singing birds circling his head.Contents1 Names 2 Life of Aengus 3 Connections 4 Etymology 5 Modern depictions 6 Namesakes 7 Texts 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksNames[edit] In Old Irish his name is spelled Oíngus or Óengus [oiŋɡus], from Proto-Celtic *oino- "one" and gus "strength" (or possibly "choice"). In Middle Irish this became Áengus, and in Modern Irish Aengus
Aengus
or Aonghus [ˈeːŋɡəsˠ], [ˈeːŋɣəsˠ]. Epithets include Óengus Óc/ Aengus
Aengus
Óg (" Aengus
Aengus
the young"). Life of Aengus[edit] His parents were The Dagda
Dagda
and Boann
[...More...]

"Óengus Mac Colmáin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Marianus Scotus
Marianus Scotus (1028–1082 or 1083), was an Irish monk and chronicler[1] (who must be distinguished from his namesake Marianus Scotus of Regensburg, d. 1088, abbot of St Peter's, Regensburg[2]), was an Irishman by birth, also called Máel Brigte (Modern Irish Maelbhríde, "(Saint) Brigit's Servant").Contents1 Life 2 See also 3 Work 4 ReferencesLife[edit] He was educated by a certain Tigernach, and having become a monk in 1052[3] he crossed over to the continent of Europe in 1056, and his subsequent life was passed in the abbeys of St Martin at Cologne
Cologne
and of Fulda, and at Mainz
[...More...]

"Marianus Scotus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Columba
Saint
Saint
Columba
Columba
(Irish: Colm Cille, 'church dove';[a][1][2]; Scots: Columbkille;[3] 7 December 521 – 9 June 597) was an Irish abbot and missionary credited with spreading Christianity in what is today Scotland
Scotland
at the start of the Hiberno-Scottish mission. He founded the important abbey on Iona, which became a dominant religious and political institution in the region for centuries. He is the Patron Saint
Saint
of Derry. He was highly regarded by both the Gaels
Gaels
of Dál Riata and the Picts, and is remembered today as a Christian saint and one of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland.[4] Columba
Columba
studied under some of Ireland's most prominent church figures and founded several monasteries in the country
[...More...]

"Columba" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Baile Chuind Chétchathaig
Baile Chuind Chétchathaig ("The Vision of Conn of the Hundred Battles") is an Old Irish list of Kings of Tara or High Kings of Ireland which survives in two 16th-century manuscripts, 23 N 10 and Egerton 88. It is the earliest such king-list known, probably dating from around 700 AD. The later Baile In Scáil is closely related.Contents1 Date 2 Content and context 3 Analogues 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksDate[edit] Baile Chuind Chétchathaig was first edited by Rudolf Thurneysen, who dated it to about 700 AD and believed it to have been included in the lost Cín Dromma Snechtai manuscript
[...More...]

"Baile Chuind Chétchathaig" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hill Of Tara
The Hill of Tara
Hill of Tara
(Irish: Cnoc na Teamhrach,[2] Teamhair or Teamhair na Rí), located near the River Boyne, is an archaeological complex that runs between Navan
Navan
and Dunshaughlin
Dunshaughlin
in County Meath, Ireland
[...More...]

"Hill Of Tara" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cognomen
A cognomen (/kɒɡˈnoʊmən/;[1][2] Classical Latin: [koːŋˈnoːmen]; Latin plural cognomina; from con- "together with" and (g)nomen "name") was the third name of a citizen of ancient Rome, under Roman naming conventions. Initially, it was a nickname, but it lost that purpose when it became hereditary. Hereditary cognomina were used to augment the second name (the family name, or clan name) in order to identify a particular branch within a family or family within a clan. The term has also taken on other contemporary meanings.Contents1 Roman names 2 As a contemporary term 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksRoman names[edit] Further information: Roman naming conventions Because of the limited nature of the Latin praenomen, the cognomen developed to distinguish branches of the family from one another, and occasionally, to highlight an individual's achievement, typically in warfare
[...More...]

"Cognomen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

King Of Leinster
Patron Saint: Brigid[3] a. ^ Leinster
Leinster
contains the entirety of the Dublin
Dublin
constituency and parts of the South and Midlands–North-West constituencies; Leinster contains 49.8% of the population of the Midlands–North-West constituency and 25.9% of the population of the South constituency.[4] Leinster
Leinster
(/ˈlɛnstər/ — Irish: Laighin / Cúige Laighean — pronounced [ˈl̪ˠaːjɪnʲ] / [ˈkuːɟə ˈl̪ˠaːjɪnˠ]) is one of the Provinces of Ireland
Provinces of Ireland
situated in the east of Ireland. It comprises the ancient Kingdoms of Mide, Osraige and Leinster. Following the 12th-century Norman invasion of Ireland, the historic fifths of Leinster
Leinster
and Mide gradually merged, mainly due to the impact of the Pale, which straddled both, thereby forming the present-day province of Leinster
[...More...]

"King Of Leinster" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Eochaid Mac Domnaill
Eochaid or Eochaidh (earlier Eochu or Eocho, sometimes Anglicised as Eochy, Achaius or Haughey) is a popular medieval Irish and Scots Gaelic name deriving from Old Irish ech, horse, borne by a variety of historical and legendary figures. Variations[edit]Old Irish Modern Irish Hiberno-English Scottish Gaelic Scottish EnglishEochaidh Eochaí Eochy Eachann HectorList[edit] Eochaid mac Eirc, mythological king of the Fir
[...More...]

"Eochaid Mac Domnaill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

County Wicklow
County Wicklow (Irish: Contae Chill Mhantáin, [ˈkɔnˠt̪ˠeː ˈçɪl̪ʲ ˈwanˠt̪ˠaːnʲ]) is a county in Ireland. The last of the traditional 32 counties to be formed, as late as 1606, it is part of the Mid-East Region and is also located in the province of Leinster. It is named after the town of Wicklow, which derives from the Old Norse name Víkingaló, which means "Vikings' Meadow". Wicklow County Council is the local authority for the county
[...More...]

"County Wicklow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baltinglass
Baltinglass, historically known as Baltinglas[2][3] (Irish: Bealach Conglais, meaning "Road of Cúglas"), is a town in south-west County Wicklow, Ireland. It is located on the River Slaney
River Slaney
near the border with County Carlow
County Carlow
and County Kildare, on the N81 road. Its Irish name means "the way of Conglas", Conglas being a member of the mythological warrior collective, the Fianna. A previous Irish-language name for the village, bringing to mind its monastic past, was Mainistir an Bhealaigh.Contents1 History 2 Sport 3 Transport3.1 Rail 3.2 Bus4 People 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The surrounding area is rich in archaeological and historical sites. On the highest point of the hill, north-east of the village, lies a passage grave from the stone age whose outer walls are finished in chalk not native to the area
[...More...]

"Baltinglass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Francis John Byrne
Francis John Byrne (born 1934 - died 30 December 2017)[1] was an Irish historian. Born in Shanghai
Shanghai
where his father, a Dundalk
Dundalk
man, captained a ship on the Yellow River, Byrne was evacuated with his mother to Australia
Australia
on the outbreak of World War II. After the war, his mother returned to Ireland, where his father, who had survived internment in Japanese hands, returned to take up work as a harbour master. Byrne attended Blackrock College
Blackrock College
in County Dublin
County Dublin
where he learned Latin
Latin
and Greek, to add to the Chinese he had learned in his Shanghai childhood. He studied Early Irish History at University College Dublin where he excelled, graduating with first class honours
[...More...]

"Francis John Byrne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.