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A religious order is a lineage of
communities A community is a social unit (a group of living things) with commonality such as norms, religion Religion is a social system, social-cultural system of designated religious behaviour, behaviors and practices, morality, morals, beliefs, wor ...

communities
and
organizations An organization, or organisation (Commonwealth English The use of the English language English is a West Germanic languages, West Germanic language first spoken in History of Anglo-Saxon England, early medieval England, which has ...

organizations
of people who live in some way set apart from society in accordance with their specific religious devotion, usually characterized by the principles of its founder's religious practice. The order is composed of laypeople and, in some orders,
clergy Clergy are formal leaders within established s. Their roles and functions vary in different religious traditions, but usually involve presiding over specific rituals and teaching their religion's s and practices. Some of the terms used for ind ...
. Religious orders exist in many of the world's
religion Religion is a - of designated and practices, , s, s, , , , , or , that relates humanity to , , and elements; however, there is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion. Different religions may or may not contain v ...

religion
s.


Buddhism

In
Buddhist Buddhism (, ) is the Major religious groups#Largest religions, world's fourth-largest religion with over 520 million followers, or over 7% of the global population, known as Buddhists. Buddhism encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and ...

Buddhist
societies, a religious order is one of the number of
monastic Monasticism (from Ancient Greek , , from , , 'alone'), or monkhood, is a religion, religious way of life in which one renounces world (theology), worldly pursuits to devote oneself fully to spiritual work. Monastic life plays an important role in ...
orders of monks and nuns, many of which follow under a different school of teaching, such as Thailand's Dhammayuttika order - a monastic order founded by
King Mongkut Mongkut, also known as King Rama IV, reigning title Phra Chom Klao Chao Yu Hua) (18 October 18041 October 1868), was the fourth Monarchy of Thailand, monarch of Rattanakosin Kingdom, Siam (Thailand) under the House of Chakri, ruling from 1851 t ...

King Mongkut
(Rama IV). A well-known
Chinese Chinese can refer to: * Something related to China China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia. It is the List of countries and dependencies by population, world's most populous country, with a populat ...

Chinese
Buddhist order is the ancient Shaolin order in Ch'an (
Zen Zen ( zh, t=禪, p=Chán; ja, text= 禅, translit=zen; ko, text=선, translit=Seon; vi, text=Thiền) is a school of Mahayana Buddhism that originated in China China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country i ...

Zen
) Buddhism and in modern times the Order of Hsu Yun.


Christianity


Catholic tradition

A Catholic religious institute is a society whose members (referred to as "
religious Religion is a - of designated and practices, , s, s, , , , , or , that relates humanity to , , and elements; however, there is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion. Different religions may or may not contain v ...
") pronounce vows that are accepted by a superior in the name of the Church and who live a life of brothers or sisters in common.
Catholic religious order In the , a religious order is a community of with members that profess s. According to the , they are classed as a type of . Subcategories of religious orders are (canons and canonesses regular who recite the and serve a church and perhaps ...
s and congregations are the two historical categories of Catholic religious institutes. Religious institutes are distinct from
secular institute In the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, often referred to as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by number of members, largest Christian church, with approximately 1.3 billion baptised Catholics world ...
s, another kind of
institute of consecrated life An institute of consecrated life is an association of faithful in the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by number of members, largest Christian church, with ...
, and from lay ecclesial movements. In the Catholic Church, members of religious institutes, unless they are also
deacon A deacon is a member of the diaconate, an office in Christianity, Christian churches that is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. Major Christian churches, such as the C ...

deacon
s or
priests A priest is a religious leader authorized to perform the sacred rituals of a religion, especially as a mediatory agent between humans and one or more deities. They also have the authority or power to administer religious rites; in particu ...
in
Holy Orders In certain Christian churches Christian Church is a Protestant Protestantism is a form of Christianity that originated with the 16th-century Reformation, a movement against what its followers perceived to be Criticism of the Catholic Church ...
, are not
clergy Clergy are formal leaders within established s. Their roles and functions vary in different religious traditions, but usually involve presiding over specific rituals and teaching their religion's s and practices. Some of the terms used for ind ...
, but belong to the
laity In religious organizations, the laity consists of all members who are not part of the clergy Clergy are formal leaders within established religions. Their roles and functions vary in different religious traditions, but usually involve presidin ...
. While the state of consecrated life is neither clerical nor lay, institutes themselves are classified as one or the other, a clerical institute being one that "by reason of the purpose or design intended by the founder or by virtue of legitimate tradition, is under the direction of clerics, assumes the exercise of sacred orders, and is recognized as such by the authority of the Church". Well-known Roman Catholic religious institutes, not all of which were classified as "orders" rather than "congregations", include
Augustinians Augustinians are members of Christian religious orders that follow the Rule of Saint Augustine The Rule of Saint Augustine, written about the year 400, is a brief document divided into eight chapters and serves as an outline for religious li ...
,
Benedictines The Benedictines, officially the Order of Saint Benedict ( la, Ordo Sancti Benedicti, abbreviated as OSB), are a monastic Monasticism (from Ancient Greek Ancient Greek includes the forms of the Greek language used in ancient Greece ...
,
Bridgettines church Church may refer to: Religion * Church (building) A church building, church house, or simply church, is a building used for Christian worship services and other Christian religious activities. The term is used to refer to the physic ...
,
Carmelites The Carmelites, formally known as the Order of the Brothers of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel ( la, Ordo Fratrum Beatissimæ Virginis Mariæ de Monte Carmelo) or sometimes simply as Carmel by synecdoche A synecdoche ( , from Greek ...

Carmelites
,
Dominicans Dominican may refer to: * Someone or something from or related to the Dominican Republic ( , stress on the "mi"), on the island of Hispaniola in the Greater Antilles, in the Caribbean ** People of the Dominican Republic ** Demographics of the Domin ...
,
Franciscans , image = FrancescoCoA PioM.svg , image_size = 250px , caption = A cross, Christ's arm and Saint Francis's arm, a universal symbol of the Franciscans , abbreviation = OFM , predecessor = , m ...
,
Jesuits , image = Ihs-logo.svg , caption = Christogram A Christogram (Latin ') is a monogram or combination of letters that forms an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ, traditionally used as a Christian symbolism, ...
,
Piarists The Piarists (), also known as the Order of Poor Clerics Regular of the Mother of God of the Pious Schools ( la, Ordo Clericorum Regularium pauperum Matris Dei Scholarum Piarum, abbreviated ''SchP'') or simply Scolopi or Escolapios, is a religious ...
,
Salesians , Taiwan Taiwan (), officially the Republic of China (ROC), is a country in East Asia. Neighbouring countries include the China, People's Republic of China (PRC) to the northwest, Japan to the northeast, and the Philippines to the south. The ...
,
Oblates of Mary Immaculate The Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI) is a missionary religious congregation A religious congregation is a type of Religious institute (Catholic), religious institute in the Catholic Church. They are legally distinguished from Religious ...
and the
Congregation of Holy Cross The Congregation of Holy Cross ( la, Congregatio a Sancta Cruce) is a Catholic The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by number of members, largest Christian church, with 1.3& ...

Congregation of Holy Cross
. Several religious orders evolved during the
Crusades The Crusades were a series of religious wars initiated, supported, and sometimes directed by the Latin Church in the medieval period. The term refers especially to the Eastern Mediterranean campaigns in the period between 1095 and 1271 that h ...

Crusades
to incorporate a military mission thus became "religious military orders", such as the
Knights of the Order of Saint John
Knights of the Order of Saint John
. It is typical of non-monastic religious institutes to have a motherhouse or generalate that has jurisdiction over any number of dependent religious communities, and for its members to be moved by their superior general to any other of its communities, as the needs of the institute at any one time demand. In accordance with the concept of independent communities in the
Rule of St Benedict The ''Rule of Saint Benedict'' ( la, Regula Sancti Benedicti) is a book of precept A precept (from the la, præcipere, to teach) is a commandment, instruction, or order intended as an authoritative rule of action. Religious law In religion ...
, the
Benedictines The Benedictines, officially the Order of Saint Benedict ( la, Ordo Sancti Benedicti, abbreviated as OSB), are a monastic Monasticism (from Ancient Greek Ancient Greek includes the forms of the Greek language used in ancient Greece ...
have autonomous abbeys (so-called "independent houses"); and their members profess "stability" to the abbey where they make their
religious vows Religious vows are the public vows made by the members of religious communities pertaining to their conduct, practices, and views. In the Buddhism Buddhism (, ) is the Major religious groups#Largest religions, world's fourth-largest religi ...
. Hence they cannot move – nor be moved by their abbot or abbess – to another abbey. An "independent house" may occasionally make a new foundation which remains a "dependent house" (identified by the name "priory") until it is granted independence by Rome and itself becomes an abbey. The autonomy of each house does not prevent them being affiliated into congregations – whether national or based on some other joint characteristic – and these, in turn, form the supra-national
Benedictine Confederation The Benedictine Confederation of the Order of Saint Benedict ( la, Confœderatio Benedictina Ordinis Sancti Benedicti) is the international governing body of the Order of Saint Benedict. Origin The Benedictine Confederation is a union of monastic ...
.


Orthodox tradition

In the
Eastern Orthodox Church The Eastern Orthodox Church, also called the Orthodox Church, is the List of Christian denominations by number of members, second-largest Christian church, with approximately 220 million baptised members. It operates as a Communion (Christ ...
, there is only one type of monasticism. The profession of monastics is known as
tonsure Tonsure () is the practice of cutting or shaving some or all of the hair Hair is a protein filament that grows from follicles found in the dermis. Hair is one of the defining characteristics of mammals. The human body, apart from areas of ...

tonsure
(referring to the ritual cutting of the monastic's hair which takes place during the service) and is considered by monks to be a Sacred Mystery (Sacrament). The Rite of Tonsure is printed in the ''
Euchologion :''For the '' Book of Common Order'', sometimes called ''The Order of Geneva'' or ''Knox's Liturgy'', see that entry.'' The Euchologion ( Greek: ; Slavonic: Молитвословъ, ''Molitvoslov'' ; ro, Euhologiu/Molitfelnic) is one of the ch ...
'' (
Church Slavonic Church Slavonic (''црькъвьнословѣньскъ ѩзыкъ'', ''crĭkŭvĭnoslověnĭskŭ językŭ'', literally "Church-Slavonic language"), also known as Church Slavic, New Church Slavonic or New Church Slavic, is the conservative ...
: ''Trebnik''), the same book as the other Sacred Mysteries and services performed according to need.


Lutheran tradition

Martin Luther had concerns with the spiritual value of monastic life at the time of the Reformation. After the foundation of the
Lutheran Church Lutheranism is one of the largest branches of Protestantism Protestantism is a form of Christianity Christianity is an Abrahamic religions, Abrahamic Monotheism, monotheistic religion based on the Life of Jesus in the New Testament, life ...

Lutheran Church
es, some monasteries in Lutheran lands (such as
Amelungsborn Abbey Interior of Amelungsborn Abbey church Amelungsborn Abbey, also Amelunxborn Abbey (''Kloster Amelungsborn''), is a Lutheran Lutheranism is one of the largest branches of Protestantism that identifies with the teachings of Martin Luther, a 16th- ...
near
Negenborn Negenborn is a municipality in the district of Holzminden, in Lower Saxony Lower Saxony (german: Niedersachsen ; nds, Neddersassen; stq, Läichsaksen) is a German state (''Land'') situated in Northern Germany, northwestern Germany. It is the ...

Negenborn
and
Loccum AbbeyImage:Kloster Loccum.jpg, View of Loccum Abbey Loccum Abbey (Kloster Loccum) is a Lutheran monastery in the town of Rehburg-Loccum, Lower Saxony, near Steinhude Lake. History Originating as a foundation of Count Wilbrand of Hallermund, Loccum Abbey ...
in
Rehburg-Loccum Rehburg-Loccum () is a town 50 km north west of Hanover Hanover (; german: Hannover ; nds, Hannober) is the capital and largest city of the German States of Germany, state of Lower Saxony. Its 535,061 (2017) inhabitants make it the List of ...
) and convents (such as Ebstorf Abbey near the town of
Uelzen Uelzen (officially the ''Hanseatic Town of Uelzen'', German: ''Hansestadt Uelzen'', , Low German , , (in a stricter sense) nl, Nedersaksisch da, Plattysk, , , (rarely) , states = Northern Germany, Northern and Western Germany, weste ...
and
Bursfelde Abbey Bursfelde Abbey (in German Kloster Bursfelde) is a former Benedictine monastery located in Bursfelde, a hamlet which for administrative purposes is included in the municipality of nearby Hannoversch Münden in Lower Saxony Lower Saxony (germa ...
in
Bursfelde
Bursfelde
) adopted the Lutheran Christian faith. Other examples of Lutheran religious orders include the "
Order of Lutheran Franciscans The Order of Lutheran Franciscans (OLF) is a religious order affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), founded in 2011. The Order is open to members of ELCA Lutheran congregations, married or single, lay or ordained, who vo ...
" in the United States. Also, a
Lutheran Lutheranism is one of the largest branches of Protestantism that identifies with the teachings of Jesus Christ and was founded by Martin Luther, a 16th-century German monk and Protestant Reformers, reformer whose efforts to reform the theology ...
religious order following the Rule of St. Benedict, "The Congregation of the Servants of Christ," was established at St. Augustine's House in Oxford, Michigan, in 1958 when some other men joined Father
Arthur KreinhederFather Arthur Carl Kreinheder, C.S.C. (October 1, 1905 – October 13, 1989) was an American Lutheran Lutheranism is one of the largest branches of Protestantism that identifies with the teachings of Martin Luther, a 16th-century German Protestant ...
in observing the monastic life and offices of prayer. This order has strong ties to Lutheran Benedictine orders in Sweden ( Östanbäck Monastery) and in Germany ( Priory of St. Wigbert). In 2011, an Augustinian religious order, the Priestly Society of St. Augustine (Societas Sacerdotalis Sancti Augustini) was established by the Anglo-Lutheran Catholic Church. Its headquarters is at Christ Lutheran Church ALCC. Kent Island, Maryland, and Fr. Jens Bargmann, Ph.D., is the Grand Prior.


Anglican tradition

Religious orders in England were dissolved by
King Henry VIII Henry VIII (28 June 149128 January 1547) was King of England This list of kings and queens of the Kingdom of England The Kingdom of England (Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Ital ...
upon the separation of the English church from Roman primacy. For three hundred years, there were no formal religious orders in Anglicanism, although some informal communities – such as the Little Gidding community – occasionally sprang into being. With the advent of the
Oxford Movement The Oxford Movement was a movement of High Church The term ''high church'' refers to beliefs and practices of Christian ecclesiology In Christian theology Christian theology is the theology of Christianity, Christian belief and practi ...
in the
Church of England The Church of England (C of E) is a Christian church Christian Church is a Protestant Protestantism is a form of Christianity that originated with the 16th-century Reformation, a movement against what its followers perceived to be Critic ...
and worldwide
Anglicanism Anglicanism is a Western Western may refer to: Places *Western, Nebraska, a village in the US *Western, New York, a town in the US *Western Creek, Tasmania, a locality in Australia *Western Junction, Tasmania, a locality in Australia * ...
in the middle of the 19th century, several orders appeared. In 1841, the first order for women was established. The first order for men was founded 25 years later. Anglican religious voluntarily commit themselves for life, or a term of years, to holding their possessions in common or in trust; to a celibate life in community; and obedience to their Rule and Constitution. There are presently thirteen active religious orders for men, fifty-three for women, and eight mixed gender.


Methodist tradition

The
Methodist Church of Great Britain The Methodist Church of Great Britain is a Protestant Protestantism is a form of that originated with the 16th-century , a movement against what its followers perceived to be in the . Protestants originating in the Reformation reject the ...
, and its ancestors, have established a number of orders of
Deaconesses The ministry of a deaconess is, in modern times, a non-ordained ministry for women in some Protestant churches to provide pastoral care, especially for other women. The term is also applied to some women deacons in the early church. The word come ...
, who are ordained as both regular and secular clergy. The Methodist Diaconal Order (MDO) currently admits both men and women to the Order. Since the functions of a deacon are primarily
pastoral A pastoral lifestyle is that of shepherds herd A herd is a social group of certain animals of the same species, either wildness, wild or Domestication, domestic. The form of collective animal behavior associated with this is called ''he ...

pastoral
, the MDO may therefore be regarded as an order of Regular clerics. The Order of Saint Luke is a religious order in the
United Methodist Church The United Methodist Church (UMC) is a worldwide mainline Protestant The mainline Protestant churches (also called mainstream Protestant and sometimes oldline Protestant) are a group of Protestant denominations in the United States that contras ...

United Methodist Church
dedicated to sacramental and liturgical scholarship, education, and practice.


Anabaptist tradition

Some Protestant religious orders follow Anabaptist theology. These would include the
Hutterites Hutterites (german: link=no, Hutterer), also called Hutterian Brethren (German: ), are a Communalism, communal ethnoreligious group, ethnoreligious branch of Anabaptists, who, like the Amish and Mennonites, trace their roots to the Radical Refor ...
and Bruderhof, who live in full community of goods and living as a peace church.


Jehovah's Witnesses

Among their corporations, the '' Religious Order of Jehovah's Witnesses'' cares for matters specific to
Jehovah's Witnesses Jehovah's Witnesses is a millenarian Millenarianism (also millenarism), from Latin ''mīllēnārius'' "containing a thousand", is the belief by a religious Religion is a social system, social-cultural system of designated religious ...
''special full-time servants''. In a particular branch,
traveling overseers
traveling overseers
, special pioneers, and branch staff are considered members of the ''Order of Special Full-time Servants and the Bethel Family''. Globally, their order is the ''Worldwide Order of Special Full-Time Servants of Jehovah’s Witnesses''. Male and female members of such religious orders typically make a formal
vow of poverty Poverty is the state of not having enough material possessions or income for a person's basic needs. Poverty may include social, economic, and political Politics (from , ) is the set of activities that are associated with Decision-maki ...
and are granted certain status and exemptions by many governments. While Jehovah's Witnesses do not consider members of their religious orders to be a
clergy Clergy are formal leaders within established s. Their roles and functions vary in different religious traditions, but usually involve presiding over specific rituals and teaching their religion's s and practices. Some of the terms used for ind ...
separate from other Witnesses, who are also ordained ministers, they do recognize that a government may consider them such for administrative purposes. Jehovah's Witnesses do not have a separate clergy class, but consider an adherent's qualified
baptism Baptism (from the Greek language, Greek noun βάπτισμα ''báptisma'') is a Christians, Christian rite of initiation, admission and Adoption (theology), adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into Christianity. It may be pe ...
to constitute his
ordination Ordination is the process by which individuals are , that is, set apart and elevated from the class to the , who are thus then (usually by the composed of other clergy) to perform various religious . The process and ceremonies of ordination va ...

ordination
as a
minister Minister may refer to: * Minister (Christianity)Image:LutheranClergy.JPG, upA Lutheran minister wearing a Geneva gown and Bands (neckwear), bands. In many churches, ministers wear distinctive clothing, called vestments, when presiding over service ...
. Governments have generally recognized that Jehovah's Witnesses' full-time appointees qualify as ministers regardless of sex or appointment as an
elder An elder is someone with a degree of seniority or authority. Elder or elders may refer to: Positions Administrative * Elder (administrative title), a position of authority Cultural * American Indian elder, a person who has and transmits cul ...
or deacon ("ministerial servant"); the religion itself asserts what is sometimes termed "
ecclesiastical privilege In the canon law Canon law (from grc, κανών, , a 'straight measuring rod, ruler') is a set of ordinances and regulations made by ecclesiastical jurisdiction, ecclesiastical authority (Church leadership), for the government of a Christian orga ...
" only for its appointed elders.


Islam


Sufis

A
tariqah A tariqa (or ''tariqah''; ar, طريقة ') is a school or order of Sufism Sufism ( ar, ٱلصُّوفِيَّة), also known as Tasawwuf (), is mysticism Mysticism is popularly known as becoming one with God or the Absolute, but may ...
is how a religious order is described in
Sufism Sufism ( ar, ٱلصُّوفِيَّة), also known as Tasawwuf (), is in , "characterized ... y particularvalues, ritual practices, doctrines and institutions". It is variously defined as "Islamic mysticism",Martin Lings, ''What is Sufism? ...

Sufism
. It especially refers to the mystical teaching and spiritual practices of such an order with the aim of seeking ''
ḥaqīqah
ḥaqīqah
'' "ultimate truth". Such tariqas typically have a ''
murshid ''Murshid'' ( ar, مرشد) is Arabic for "guide" or "teacher", derived from the root ''r-sh-d'', with the basic meaning of having integrity, being sensible, mature. Particularly in Sufism Sufism ( ar, ٱلصُّوفِيَّة), also known as ...
'' (guide) who plays the role of leader or spiritual director. Members and followers of a tariqa are known as '' murīdīn'' (singular ''murīd''), meaning "desirous", viz. "desiring the knowledge of knowing God and loving God" (also called a ''
faqīr
faqīr
'' ). Tariqas have
silsila Silsila ( ar, سِلْسِلَة) is an Arabic word meaning ''chain'', ''link'', ''connection'' often used in various senses of lineage. In particular, it may be translated as "(religious) order" or "spiritual genealogy" where one Sufi Mast ...
s ( ar, سلسلة) which is the spiritual lineage of the Shaikhs of that order. Almost all orders trace their silsila back to Prophet
Mohammad ) , birth_date = , birth_place = , death_date = , death_place = , resting_place = , resting_place_coordinates = , nationality = , other_names = , years_active = , notable ...

Mohammad
. Tariqas are spread all over the Muslim world.


Shia

Among
Shias Shia Islam or Shi'ism is the second largest branch A branch ( or , ) or tree branch (sometimes referred to in botany Botany, also called , plant biology or phytology, is the science of plant life and a branch of biology. A botanis ...
,
Noorbakshia Islam Noorbakhshia is a school of Islamic jurisprudence that emphasizes the Muslim Unity. Its very foundations rests on the belief in Allah, Angels, Prophets, Day of Judgement, Holy Quran and other Holy Islamic Scriptures revealed upon previous Prophets. ...
is an order that blends Sufi principles with Shia doctrine. It claims to trace its direct spiritual lineage and chain (silsilah) to the Islamic prophet Muhammad through Ali, the first imam of Shia Islam.


Salafi

There is some historical connection between certain schools of Sufism and the development of
Wahhabism Wahhabism ( ar, الوهابية, lit=Wahhabism, translit=al-Wahhābiyyah) is a term used to refer to the Islamic revival, Islamic revivalist and Islamic fundamentalism, fundamentalist movement within Sunni Islam which is associated with the H ...
and
Salafism The Salafi movement, also called the Salafist movement, ''Salafiyyah'' and Salafism, is a reform Reform ( lat, reformo) means the improvement or amendment of what is wrong, corrupt, unsatisfactory, etc. The use of the word in this way emerges i ...
due to the history of these denominations. Ibn Abd al-Wahhab was inspired by
Ibn Taymiyyah Taqī ad-Dīn ʾAḥmad ibn ʿAbd al-Ḥalīm ibn ʿAbd al-Salām Numayrid dynasty, al-Numayrī al-Ḥarrānī ( ar, تقي الدين أحمد بن عبد الحليم بن عبد السلام النميري الحراني , January 22, 1263 – ...
, a 14th-century scholar and dedicated Sufi, who is however remembered mainly as an outspoken critic of the excesses of certain schools of Sufism during his time. Today, Wahhabism is often represented as inimical to Sufism. This is not the original conception of Ibn Abd al-Wahhab, who accepted Sufism as a genuine part of Islam. See e.g.
nsweringwhabismandsalafism.wordpress.com
"Ibn `Abd al- Wahhab said in the third volume of his complete works published by Ibn Sa`ud University, on page 31 of the Fatawa wa rasa’il, Fifth Question: ''Know — may Allah guide you — that Allah Almighty has sent Muhammad, blessings and peace upon him, with right guidance, consisting in beneficial knowledge, and with true religion consisting in righteous action. The adherents of religion are as follows: among them are those who concern themselves with learning and fiqh, and discourse about it, such as the jurists; and among them are those who concern themselves with worship and the pursuit of the Hereafter, such as the Sufis. Allah has sent His Prophet with this religion which encompasses both kinds, that is: fiqh and tasawwuf.''"


Judaism


Other traditions

A form of ordered religious living is common also in many tribes and religions of
Africa Africa is the world's second-largest and second-most populous continent A continent is any of several large landmass A landmass, or land mass, is a large region In geography Geography (from Greek: , ''geographia'', ...

Africa
and
South America South America is a continent A continent is any of several large landmasses. Generally identified by convention (norm), convention rather than any strict criteria, up to seven geographical regions are commonly regarded as continent ...

South America
, though on a smaller scale, and some parts of England. Due to the unorganized character of these small religious groups, orders are not as visible as in other well-organised religions.


See also

*
Asceticism Asceticism (; from the el, ἄσκησις ''áskesis'', "exercise, training") is a lifestyle characterized by abstinence from sensual pleasures, often for the purpose of pursuing spiritual goals. Ascetics may withdraw from the world for thei ...
*
Monasticism Monasticism (from Ancient Greek Ancient Greek includes the forms of the used in and the from around 1500 BC to 300 BC. It is often roughly divided into the following periods: (), Dark Ages (), the period (), and the period (). An ...
*
Mendicancy A mendicant (from la, mendicans, "begging") is one who practices mendicancy, relying chiefly or exclusively on alms Alms (, ) or almsgiving involves giving to others as an act of virtue Virtue ( la, virtus) is a morality, moral excellence. ...
* Religion-supporting organization


Notes


External links

*
VocationNetwork.org
information about Catholic religious communities and life as a sister, brother, or priest.
DigitalVocationGuide.org
digital edition of VISION, the annual Catholic religious vocation discernment guide.

{{DEFAULTSORT:Religious Order Religious orders,