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The Archdiocese of Boston ( la, Archidiœcesis Bostoniensis) is an ecclesiastical territory or
archdiocese In Ecclesiastical polity, church governance, a diocese or bishopric is the ecclesiastical district under the jurisdiction of a bishop. History In the later organization of the Roman Empire, the increasingly subdivided Roman province, pro ...
of the
Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with 1.3 billion baptised Baptism (from the Greek language, Greek noun βάπτισμα ''báptisma'') is a Christians, Christian ...

Catholic Church
( particularly the Roman Catholic or
Latin Church , native_name_lang = la , image = San Giovanni in Laterano - Rome.jpg , imagewidth = 250px , alt = Façade of the Archbasilica of St. John in Lateran , caption = Archbasilica of Saint Joh ...
) located in the
New England New England is a region comprising six states in the Northeastern United States The Northeastern United States (also referred to as the American Northeast, the Northeast, and the East Coast) is a geographical region In geography ...

New England
region of the
United States The United States of America (U.S.A. or USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or America, is a country Continental United States, primarily located in North America. It consists of 50 U.S. state, states, a Washington, D.C., ...

United States
. Its territorial remit encompasses the whole of Essex County, Middlesex County,
Norfolk CountyNorfolk County may refer to: *Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States *Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada *Norfolk County, Virginia, (defunct) *Norfolk, a county in England *Norfolk, Virginia, an independent city and county-equivalent in Virginia, ...
, and Suffolk County, and also all of
Plymouth Plymouth () is a port city A city is a large human settlement.Goodall, B. (1987) ''The Penguin Dictionary of Human Geography''. London: Penguin.Kuper, A. and Kuper, J., eds (1996) ''The Social Science Encyclopedia''. 2nd edition. London: ...
except the towns of
MarionMarion may refer to: People *Marion (given name) *Marion (surname) *Marion Silva Fernandes, Brazilian footballer known simply as "Marion" *Marion (singer), Filipino singer-songwriter and pianist Marion Aunor (born 1992) Places Antarctica * Marion ...
, Mattapoisett, and Wareham in the
Commonwealth A commonwealth is a traditional English term for a political community founded for the common good In philosophy Philosophy (from , ) is the study of general and fundamental questions, such as those about reason, Metaphysics, existenc ...
of
Massachusetts Massachusetts (, ), officially the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of State * ...

Massachusetts
. It is led by a
prelate A prelate () is a high-ranking member of the clergy Clergy are formal leaders within established s. Their roles and functions vary in different religious traditions, but usually involve presiding over specific rituals and teaching their r ...
archbishop In many Christian Denominations Christians () are people who follow or adhere to Christianity, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus in Christianity, Jesus Christ. The words ''Christ (title), Christ'' an ...
who serves as
pastor A pastor (abbreviated as "Pr" or "Ptr" , or "Ps" ) is the leader of a Christian Christians () are people who follow or adhere to Christianity, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus in Christianity, Jesus ...

pastor
of the
mother church Mother church or matrice is a term depicting the Christian Church Christian Church is a Protestant Protestantism is a form of Christianity that originated with the 16th-century Reformation, a movement against what its followers perceived to b ...
, Cathedral of the Holy Cross in the South End of Boston. The Archdiocese of Boston is a
metropolitan see Metropolitan may refer to: * Metropolitan area A metropolitan area or metro is a region consisting of a densely populated urban core Urban means "related to a city". In that sense, the term may refer to: * Urban area, geographical area di ...
with six
suffragan diocese A suffragan diocese is one of the diocese In Ecclesiastical polity, church governance, a diocese or bishopric is the ecclesiastical district under the jurisdiction of a bishop. History In the later organization of the Roman Empire, the ...
: the
Dioceses of Burlington
Dioceses of Burlington
,
Fall River Fall River is a city in Bristol County, Massachusetts, United States. The City of Fall River's population was 88,857 at the 2010 census, making it the tenth-largest city in the state. Located along the eastern shore of Mount Hope Bay Moun ...

Fall River
,
Manchester Manchester () is the most-populous city and metropolitan borough A metropolitan borough is a type of local government district The districts of England (also known as local authority districts or local government districts to distinguis ...

Manchester
,
Portland in Maine
Portland in Maine
,
Springfield in Massachusetts
Springfield in Massachusetts
, and
Worcester Worcester may refer to: Places United Kingdom * Worcester, England, a city in Worcestershire ** Worcester (UK Parliament constituency) * Worcester Park, London, England * Worcestershire, a county in England United States * Worcester, Massachus ...

Worcester
. As of 2018, there are 284
parish A parish is a territorial entity in many Christian Christians () are people who follow or adhere to Christianity, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus in Christianity, Jesus Christ. The words ''Christ ( ...
es in the archdiocese, 617
diocesan priests The term secular clergy refers to deacon A deacon is a member of the diaconate, an office in Christianity, Christian churches that is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditio ...
, and 275
deacon A deacon is a member of the diaconate, an office in Christianity, Christian churches that is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. Major Christian churches, such as the C ...

deacon
s. In 2018, the archdiocese estimated that more than 1.9 million Catholics were in its territory.


History


Early history

New England's first settlers were Congregationalists and, in Rhode Island, Baptists who were disappointed that Protestant reforms in the Church of England did not go far enough. These dissenters followed Luther and Calvin in rejecting the selling of indulgences, the celebration of Mass in Latin, the doctrine of
transubstantiation Transubstantiation (Latin language, Latin: ''transsubstantiatio''; Greek language, Greek: μετουσίωσις ''metousiosis'') is, according to the teaching of the Catholic Church, "the change of the whole substance of bread into the substance ...
, and papal authority. Several of the colonies thus enacted anti-Catholic statutes, banning Catholic worship and Massachusetts even made it a crime, with a potential sentence of imprisonment for life, for a Catholic priest to reside the colony."Freedom of Religion comes to Boston" on Web Site of Archdiocese of Boston.
/ref> The political necessity of the Revolutionary War drove a change in popular attitudes. The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, written by John Adams and ratified in 1780, established religious freedom in the new state—and, being the first state constitution, its framework of government became a model for the constitutions of other states and, eventually, for the federal constitution. On November 2, 1788, the Abbé de la Poterie, a former French naval chaplain serving Boston, celebrated the city's first public Mass in a converted Huguenot chapel located at 24 School Street in Boston, which he named Holy Cross Church. Two refugees from the French Revolution ministering to Boston's Catholic population at the turn of the century, Fr. Francis Anthony Matignon and Fr. Jean Louis Lefebvre, raised the funds to build a larger building, the Church of the Holy Cross. These buildings no longer exist, but they were the foundation of the Catholic Church in Massachusetts.


Formation

Pope Pius VII Pope Pius VII (14 August 1742 – 20 August 1823), born Barnaba Niccolò Maria Luigi Chiaramonti, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 14 March 1800 to his death in 1823. Chiaramonti was also a monk of the Order of Sa ...

Pope Pius VII
erected the Diocese of Boston April 8, 1808, taking the territory of the states of
Connecticut Connecticut () is the southernmost state in the New England region of the United States. As of the 2010 United States census, 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, second-highest level of List of U.S. states and territories by H ...
,
Massachusetts Massachusetts (, ), officially the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of State * ...

Massachusetts
(the territory of which included the present state of
Maine Maine () is a U.S. state, state in the New England region of the United States, bordered by New Hampshire to the west; the Gulf of Maine to the southeast; and the Provinces and territories of Canada, Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Qu ...

Maine
at that time),
New Hampshire New Hampshire ( ) is a U.S. state, state in the New England region of the United States. It is bordered by Massachusetts to the south, Vermont to the west, Maine and the Gulf of Maine to the east, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the nor ...

New Hampshire
,
Rhode Island Rhode Island (, like ''road''), officially the State of Rhode Island, is a state in the New England New England is a region comprising six states in the Northeastern United States The Northeastern United States (also referred to as ...
, and
Vermont Vermont () is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of State * The State (newspaper), ''The State'' (newspaper), a daily newspaper in ...

Vermont
from the
Diocese of Baltimore The Metropolitan Archdiocese of Baltimore ( la, Archidiœcesis Baltimorensis) is the premier (or first) Episcopal see, see of the Roman Catholic (term), Roman Catholic Church in the United States. The archdiocese comprises the Baltimore, City of B ...

Diocese of Baltimore
. He simultaneously erected the , the , and the (Kentucky), also taking their territory from the Diocese of Baltimore, and elevated the Diocese of Baltimore to a
metropolitan archdioceseA metropolis religious jurisdiction, or a metropolitan archdiocese, is an episcopal see The seat or ''cathedra'' of the Bishop of Rome in the Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran An episcopal see is, in the usual meaning of the phrase, the area of a ...
, designating all four new dioceses as its suffragans.
Exponential growth Exponential growth is a process that increases quantity over time. It occurs when the instantaneous rate of change (that is, the derivative In mathematics, the derivative of a function of a real variable measures the sensitivity to change ...

Exponential growth
of the Catholic Church in New England through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries led to gradual reconfiguration of the ecclesiastical structure of the original territory of the Diocese of Boston. * On 20 November 1843,
Pope Gregory XVI Pope Gregory XVI ( la, Gregorius XVI; born Bartolomeo Alberto Cappellari; 18 September 1765 – 1 June 1846) was head of the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian churc ...

Pope Gregory XVI
erected the , taking the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island and Barnstable County,
Bristol County Bristol () is a City status in the United Kingdom, city and Ceremonial counties of England, ceremonial county in England. With a population of 463,400, it is the most populous city in South West England. The wider Bristol Built-up Area, Bristo ...
,
Dukes County Dukes County is a County (United States), county located in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. As of the 2010 United States Census, 2010 census, the population was 16,535, making it the second-least populous county in Massachusetts. Its county seat i ...
,
Nantucket County Nantucket is an island about by ferry south from Cape Cod Cape Cod is a geographic cape extending into the Atlantic Ocean from the southeastern corner of mainland Massachusetts Massachusetts (, ), officially the Commonwealth of Massac ...
and the towns of
MarionMarion may refer to: People *Marion (given name) *Marion (surname) *Marion Silva Fernandes, Brazilian footballer known simply as "Marion" *Marion (singer), Filipino singer-songwriter and pianist Marion Aunor (born 1992) Places Antarctica * Marion ...
, Mattapoisett, and Wareham along the south coast of Plymouth County of Massachusetts from the Diocese of Boston and making it a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Baltimore.Page on Archdiocese of Boston on ''Catholic Hierarchy'' web site.
/ref> * On 19 July 1850,
Pope Pius IX Pope Pius IX ( it, Pio IX, ''Pio Nono''; born Giovanni Maria Mastai Ferretti; 13 May 1792 – 7 February 1878) was head of the Catholic Church from 1846 to 1878, the List of popes by length of reign, longest verified papal reign. He was notable ...

Pope Pius IX
elevated the Diocese of New York to a metropolitan archdiocese, assigning the Diocese of Boston, the Diocese of Hartford, the Diocese of Albany, and the Diocese of Buffalo as its initial suffragan sees. * On 29 July 1853, Pope Pius IX erected the
Diocese of Burlington The Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington ( la, Dioecesis Burlingtonensis) is a diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the New England region of the United States, comprising the entire state of Vermont. The Diocese of Burlington was canonically ere ...

Diocese of Burlington
, taking the State of Vermont from the Diocese of Boston, and the , taking the states of Maine and New Hampshire from the Diocese of Boston. He designated both new dioceses as suffragans of the Metropolitan Archdiocese of New York. (The title of the Diocese of Portland formally became Diocese of Portland in Maine when
Pope Pius XI Pope Pius XI ( it, Pio XI), born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti (; 31 May 1857 – 10 February 1939), was head of the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian c ...
transferred the see of the to Portland, Oregon, thus changing the title of the latter to Archdiocese of Portland in Oregon, on 26 September 1928.) * On 14 June 1870, Pope Pius IX erected the , taking
Berkshire County Berkshire County (pronounced ) is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary, L. Brookes (ed.), 2005, Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, Edinburgh in certain modern na ...
,
Franklin County Franklin County may refer to: Australia *Franklin County, New South Wales Franklin County is one of the 141 Cadastral divisions of New South Wales. It lies between Waverley Creek and the Lachlan River, in the area to the north-west of Hillston. ...
, Hampden County,
Hampshire County Hampshire (, ; abbreviated to Hants) is a Counties of England, county in South East England on the English Channel coast. The county town is Winchester, England's former capital city. Its two largest cities, Southampton and Portsmouth, are admi ...
, and
Worcester CountyWorcester County is the name of two counties in the United States of America: *Worcester County, Massachusetts *Worcester County, Maryland See also

*Worcestershire, England {{Geodis, uscounty ...
from the Diocese of Boston and making it a suffragan of the Metropolitan Archdiocese of New York. This action reduced the territory of the Diocese of Boston to that of the present metropolitan archdiocese. (The title of the Diocese of Springfield formally became Diocese of Springfield in Massachusetts when
Pope Pius XI Pope Pius XI ( it, Pio XI), born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti (; 31 May 1857 – 10 February 1939), was head of the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian c ...
moved the see of the Diocese of Alton to Springfield, Illinois, thus changing the title of the latter to Diocese of Springfield in Illinois, on 26 October 1923.) * On 16 February 1872, Pope Pius IX erected the
Diocese of Providence The Roman Catholic Diocese of Providence ( la, Dioecesis Providentiensis) is a diocese of the Catholic Church in the United States. The diocese was erected by Pope Pius IX on February 17, 1872 and originally comprised the entire U.S. state, sta ...
, taking the State of Rhode Island and the region of southeastern Massachusetts had been part of the Diocese of Hartford from the latter and making it a suffragan of the Metropolitan Archdiocese of New York. * On 12 February 1875, Pope Pius IX elevated the Diocese of Boston to a metropolitan archdiocese, designating the Diocese of Burlington, the Diocese of Hartford, the Diocese of Portland, the Diocese of Providence, and the Diocese of Springfield as the initial suffragans of the new metropolitan see. The new metropolitan province thus encompassed the original territory of the Diocese of Boston. * On 15 April 1884,
Pope Leo XIII Pope Leo XIII ( it, Leone XIII; born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci; 2 March 1810 – 20 July 1903) was the head of the Catholic Church from 20 February 1878 to his death in 1903. He was the oldest pope (living till the age of 93), w ...

Pope Leo XIII
erected the , taking the State of New Hampshire from the Diocese of Portland and making it a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Boston. * On 12 March 1904,
Pope Pius X Pope Pius X ( it, Pio X; born Giuseppe Melchiorre Sarto; 2 June 1835 – 20 August 1914) was head of the Catholic Church as Pope from August 1903 to his death in 1914. Pius X is known for vigorously opposing Modernism in the Catholic Churc ...

Pope Pius X
erected the
Diocese of Fall River The Roman Catholic Diocese of Fall River ( la, Dioecesis Riverormensis) is a diocese of the Roman Catholic Church spanning Barnstable County, Massachusetts, Barnstable County, Bristol County, Massachusetts, Bristol County, Dukes County, Massachusett ...

Diocese of Fall River
, taking the region of southeastern Massachusetts that were then part of the Diocese of Providence from that diocese and making it a suffragan of the Metropolitan Archdiocese of Boston. * On 14 January 1950,
Pope Pius XII Pope Pius XII ( it, Pio XII), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (; 2 March 18769 October 1958), was head of the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, ...
erected the , taking Worcester County from the Diocese of Springfield in Massachusetts and making it a suffragan of the Metropolitan Archdiocese of Boston. * On 6 August 1953, Pope Pius XII erected the Diocese of Bridgeport and the
Diocese of Norwich The Diocese of Norwich is an ecclesiastical jurisdiction or diocese of the Church of England that forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. History It traces its roots in an unbroken line to the diocese of the Bishop of the East A ...

Diocese of Norwich
, taking the respective territory thereof from the Diocese of Hartford. He simultaneously elevated the Diocese of Hartford to a metropolitan archdiocese, designating the Diocese of Bridgeport, the Diocese of Norwich, and the Diocese of Providence as its suffragans. This action established the present territory and configuration of both the Metropolitan Province of Boston, spanning the states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts, and the Metropolitan Province of Hartford, spanning the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island.


Diocesan offices

In the 1920s, Cardinal William O'Connell moved the
chancery Chancery may refer to: * Chancery (diplomacy), the building that houses a diplomatic mission, such as an embassy * Chancery (medieval office), a medieval writing office * Chancery (Scotland) (also called The office of Director of Chancery, or Chan ...
from offices near Holy Cross Cathedral in the South End to 127 Lake Street in the
Brighton Brighton () is a constituent part of the city A city is a large human settlement.Goodall, B. (1987) ''The Penguin Dictionary of Human Geography''. London: Penguin.Kuper, A. and Kuper, J., eds (1996) ''The Social Science Encyclopedia''. 2nd ...
neighborhood of Boston.Changes come to Lake Street
''The Boston Globe'', May 24, 2007
"Lake Street" was a
metonym Metonymy () is a figure of speech A figure of speech or rhetorical figure is a word or phrase that entails an intentional deviation from ordinary language use in order to produce a rhetoric Rhetoric () is the Art (skill), art of p ...
for the Bishop and the office of the Archdiocese. In June 2004, the archdiocese sold the archbishop's residence and the
chancery Chancery may refer to: * Chancery (diplomacy), the building that houses a diplomatic mission, such as an embassy * Chancery (medieval office), a medieval writing office * Chancery (Scotland) (also called The office of Director of Chancery, or Chan ...
and surrounding lands in Brighton to
Boston College Boston College (BC) is a private Private or privates may refer to: Music * "In Private "In Private" was the third single in a row to be a charting success for United Kingdom, British singer Dusty Springfield, after an absence of nearly tw ...
, in part to defray costs associated with numerous cases of sexual abuse by clergy of the Archdiocese (see below). The offices of the Archdiocese moved to an office building that previously housed the Internet-only stock brokerage E*Trade in
Braintree, Massachusetts Braintree (), officially the Town of Braintree, is a municipality in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. Although officially known as a town, Braintree is a city, with a mayor-council government, mayor-c ...
. The archdiocesan seminary, Saint John's Seminary, remains on the property in Brighton.


Clergy sexual abuse scandal and settlements

At the beginning of the 21st century the archdiocese was shaken by accusations of sexual abuse by clergy that culminated in the resignation of its archbishop, Cardinal
Bernard Francis Law Bernard Francis Law (November 4, 1931 – December 20, 2017) was an American cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church The Catholic Church, often referred to as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by numbe ...

Bernard Francis Law
, on December 13, 2002. In September 2003, the archdiocese settled over 500 abuse-related claims for $85 million. Victims received an average of $92,000 each and the perpetrators included 140 priests and two others.


Coat of arms

The coat of arms of the Archdiocese, shown in the information box to the right at the top of this article, has a blue shield with a gold cross and a gold "trimount" over a silver and blue "Barry-wavy" at the base of the shield. The "trimount" of three ''coupreaux'' represents the City of Boston, the original name of which was Trimountaine in reference to the three hills on which the city's original settlement stood. The cross, ''fleurettée'', honors the Cathedral of the Holy Cross while also serving as a reminder that the first bishop of Boston and other early ecclesiastics were natives of France. The "Barry-wavy" is a symbol of the sea, alluding to Boston's role as a major seaport whose first non-indigenous settlers came from across the sea.


Communications media

The diocesan newspaper '' The Pilot'' has been published in Boston since 1829. The Archdiocese's ''Catholic Television Center'', founded in 1955, produces programs and operates the cable television network
CatholicTV The CatholicTV Network, commonly known as CatholicTV, is a Catholic The Catholic Church, often referred to as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by number of members, largest Christian church, with approximat ...
. From 1964 to 1966, it owned and operated a broadcast television station under the call letters WIHS-TV.


Ecclesiastical province

The Archdiocese of Boston is also metropolitan see for the Ecclesiastical province of Boston. This means that the archbishop of Boston is the
metropolitan Metropolitan may refer to: * Metropolitan area, a region consisting of a densely populated urban core and its less-populated surrounding territories * Metropolitan borough, a form of local government district in England * Metropolitan county, a type ...

metropolitan
for the province. The
suffragan diocese A suffragan diocese is one of the diocese In Ecclesiastical polity, church governance, a diocese or bishopric is the ecclesiastical district under the jurisdiction of a bishop. History In the later organization of the Roman Empire, the ...
s in the province are the
Diocese of Burlington The Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington ( la, Dioecesis Burlingtonensis) is a diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the New England region of the United States, comprising the entire state of Vermont. The Diocese of Burlington was canonically ere ...

Diocese of Burlington
,
Diocese of Fall River The Roman Catholic Diocese of Fall River ( la, Dioecesis Riverormensis) is a diocese of the Roman Catholic Church spanning Barnstable County, Massachusetts, Barnstable County, Bristol County, Massachusetts, Bristol County, Dukes County, Massachusett ...

Diocese of Fall River
, , ,
Diocese of Springfield in Massachusetts The Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield in Massachusetts ( la, Diœcesis Campifontis) is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the New England region of the United States comprising the counties of Berkshire County ...

Diocese of Springfield in Massachusetts
, and the .


Pastoral regions

The Archdiocese of Boston is divided into five pastoral regions, each headed by an
episcopal vicar Episcopal may refer to: *Of or relating to a bishop A bishop is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Clergy#Christianity, Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight. Within the Cat ...
.


Bishops

The following are lists of the
Bishop A bishop is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Clergy#Christianity, Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight. Within the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Moravian Chu ...
s and
Archbishop In many Christian Denominations Christians () are people who follow or adhere to Christianity, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus in Christianity, Jesus Christ. The words ''Christ (title), Christ'' an ...
s of Boston, Coadjutors and Auxiliaries of Boston, and their years of service. Also included are other priests of this diocese who served elsewhere as bishop.


Bishops of Boston

#
Jean-Louis Lefebvre de Cheverus Jean-Louis Anne Madelain Lefebvre de Cheverus (also known as John Cheverus) (28 January 1768 – 19 July 1836) was a French people, French Roman Catholic bishop and later cardinal (Catholic Church), cardinal. He was the first Roman Catholic Archdio ...
(1808–1823) appointed
Bishop of Montauban The Roman Catholic Diocese of Montauban (Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Latium. Thr ...
and later
Archbishop of Bordeaux The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Bordeaux (–Bazas) (Latin: ''Archidioecesis Burdigalensis (–Bazensis)''; French language, French: ''Archidiocèse de Bordeaux (–Bazas)''; Occitan language, Occitan: ''Archidiocèsi de Bordèu (–Vasats)'') ...
(elevated to
Cardinal Cardinal or The Cardinal may refer to: Christianity * Cardinal (Catholic Church), a senior official of the Catholic Church * Cardinal (Church of England), two members of the College of Minor Canons of St. Paul's Cathedral Navigation * Cardina ...
in 1836) #
Benedict Joseph Fenwick Benedict Joseph Fenwick (September 3, 1782 – August 11, 1846) was an American Catholic The Catholic Church, often referred to as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by number of members, largest Christi ...

Benedict Joseph Fenwick
, S.J. (1825–1846) #
John Bernard Fitzpatrick John Bernard Fitzpatrick (November 1, 1812 – February 13, 1866) was an American bishop (Catholicism), bishop of the Roman Catholic Church. He served as Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, Bishop of Boston from 1846 until his death in 1866. Ear ...

John Bernard Fitzpatrick
(1846–1866;
coadjutor bishop A coadjutor bishop (or bishop coadjutor) is a bishop in the Catholic The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with 1.3 billion baptised Baptism (from the Greek languag ...
1843–1846) #
John Joseph Williams John Joseph Williams was an American people, American bishop (Catholic Church), bishop of the Roman Catholic Church. He was the fourth Bishop and first Archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, Archdiocese of Boston, serving between 1 ...

John Joseph Williams
(1866–1875; coadjutor bishop 1866); elevated to
Archbishop In many Christian Denominations Christians () are people who follow or adhere to Christianity, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus in Christianity, Jesus Christ. The words ''Christ (title), Christ'' an ...


Archbishops of Boston

# John Joseph Williams (1875–1907) # Cardinal
William Henry O'Connell William Henry O'Connell (December 8, 1859 – April 22, 1944) was an United States, American Cardinal (Catholicism), cardinal of the Catholic Church. He served as Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, Archbishop of Boston from 1907 until his deat ...
(1907–1944) # Cardinal Richard James Cushing (1944–1970) # Cardinal
Humberto Sousa Medeiros Humberto Sousa Medeiros, Order of Prince Henry, GCIH (October 6, 1915 – September 17, 1983) was a Portuguese-American clergyman of the Roman Catholic Church. He served as Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, Archbishop of Boston from 1970 un ...
(1970–1983) # Cardinal
Bernard Francis Law Bernard Francis Law (November 4, 1931 – December 20, 2017) was an American cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church The Catholic Church, often referred to as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by numbe ...

Bernard Francis Law
(1984–2002), resigned; later appointed
Archpriest The ecclesiastical title of archpriest or archpresbyter belongs to certain priest A priest is a religious leader Clergy are formal leaders within established religion Religion is a social Social organisms, including humans, l ...
of the
Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore The Basilica of Saint Mary Major ( it, Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore, ; la, Basilica Sanctae Mariae Maioris), or church of Santa Maria Maggiore, is a Major papal basilica as well as one of the Seven Pilgrim Churches of Rome and the large ...

Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore
# Cardinal
Seán Patrick O'Malley Seán Patrick O'Malley (born June 29, 1944) is an American Cardinal (Catholicism), cardinal of the Catholic Church serving as the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, Archbishop of Boston. O'Malley is a member of the Order of Friars Minor Cap ...
, O.F.M.Cap. (2003–present)


Current Auxiliary Bishops of Boston

* Robert Francis Hennessey (2006–present) * Peter John Uglietto (2010–present) * Mark William O'Connell (2016–present) * Robert P. Reed (2016–present)


Former Auxiliary Bishops of Boston

* John Brady (1891–1910) * Joseph Gaudentius Anderson (1909–1927) * John Bertram Peterson (1927–1932), appointed
Bishop of Manchester The Bishop of Manchester is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Manchester in the Province of York The Province of York, or less formally the Northern Province, is one of two ecclesiastical provinces making up the Church of Englan ...

Bishop of Manchester
*
Francis Spellman Francis Joseph Spellman (May 4, 1889 – December 2, 1967) was an American bishop and cardinal Cardinal or The Cardinal may refer to: Christianity * Cardinal (Catholic Church), a senior official of the Catholic Church * Cardinal (Church of ...
(1932–1939), appointed Archbishop of New York (
Cardinal Cardinal or The Cardinal may refer to: Christianity * Cardinal (Catholic Church), a senior official of the Catholic Church * Cardinal (Church of England), two members of the College of Minor Canons of St. Paul's Cathedral Navigation * Cardina ...
in 1946) * Richard J. Cushing (1939–1944), appointed Archbishop here (Cardinal in 1958) * Louis Francis Kelleher (1945–1946) * John Wright (1947–1950), appointed Bishop of Worcester, then , then
Prefect Prefect (from the Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Latium. Through the power of th ...

Prefect
of the
Congregation for the Clergy The Congregation for the Clergy (; formerly the Sacred Congregation for the Clergy and Sacred Congregation of the Council) is the congregation of the Roman Curia responsible for overseeing matters regarding priests and deacons not belonging to r ...
(elevated to
Cardinal Cardinal or The Cardinal may refer to: Christianity * Cardinal (Catholic Church), a senior official of the Catholic Church * Cardinal (Church of England), two members of the College of Minor Canons of St. Paul's Cathedral Navigation * Cardina ...
in 1969) * Thomas Francis Markham (1950–1952) * Eric Francis MacKenzie (1950–1969) * Jeremiah Francis Minihan (1954–1973) * Thomas Joseph Riley (1959–1976) * Daniel A. Cronin (1968–1970), appointed Diocese of Fall River, Bishop of Fall River and later Archdiocese of Hartford, Archbishop of Hartford * Joseph Francis Maguire (1971–1976), appointed Diocese of Springfield in Massachusetts, Coadjutor Bishop of Springfield in Massachusetts and subsequently succeeded to that see * Lawrence Joseph Riley (1971–1990) * Joseph John Ruocco (1974–1980) * Thomas Vose Daily (1974–1984), appointed Diocese of Palm Beach, Bishop of Palm Beach and later Diocese of Brooklyn, Bishop of Brooklyn * John Joseph Mulcahy (1974–1992) * John Michael D'Arcy (1975–1985), appointed Roman Catholic Diocese of Fort Wayne–South Bend, Bishop of Fort Wayne-South Bend * Daniel Anthony Hart (1976–1995), appointed Roman Catholic Diocese of Norwich, Bishop of Norwich * Alfred C. Hughes (1981–1993), appointed Roman Catholic Diocese of Baton Rouge, Bishop of Baton Rouge and later Archbishop of New Orleans * Robert Joseph Banks, Robert J. Banks (1985–1990), appointed Roman Catholic Diocese of Green Bay, Bishop of Green Bay * Roberto Octavio González Nieves, O.F.M. (1988–1995), appointed Diocese of Corpus Christi, Coadjutor Bishop of Corpus Christi and subsequently succeeded to that see, and later Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Juan de Puerto Rico, Archbishop of San Juan in Puerto Rico * John R. McNamara (1992–1999) * John P. Boles (1992–2006) * John Brendan McCormack (1995–1998), appointed
Bishop of Manchester The Bishop of Manchester is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Manchester in the Province of York The Province of York, or less formally the Northern Province, is one of two ecclesiastical provinces making up the Church of Englan ...

Bishop of Manchester
* William Murphy (Bishop of Rockville Centre), William F. Murphy (1995–2001), appointed Diocese of Rockville Centre, Bishop of Rockville Centre * Francis Xavier Irwin (1996–2009) * Emilio S. Allué, S.D.B. (1996–2010) * Richard Joseph Malone (2000–2004), appointed Roman Catholic Diocese of Portland, Bishop of Portland and later Roman Catholic Diocese of Buffalo, Bishop of Buffalo * Richard Lennon (2001–2006), appointed Diocese of Cleveland, Bishop of Cleveland * Walter James Edyvean (2001–2014) * John Anthony Dooher (2006–2018) * Arthur Kennedy (bishop), Arthur L. Kennedy (2010–2017) * Robert Deeley, Robert P. Deeley (2012–2013), appointed Diocese of Portland, Bishop of Portland


Other priests of this diocese who became bishops

* William Tyler (bishop), William Barber Tyler, appointed Archdiocese of Hartford, Bishop of Hartford in 1843 * Patrick Thomas O'Reilly, appointed Bishop of Springfield in Massachusetts in 1870 * James Augustine Healy, appointed Diocese of Portland, Bishop of Portland in 1875 * Lawrence Stephen McMahon (priest here, 1860–1872), appointed Archdiocese of Hartford, Bishop of Hartford in 1879 * Matthew Harkins, appointed Diocese of Providence, Bishop of Providence in 1887 * Edward Patrick Allen, appointed Archdiocese of Mobile, Bishop of Mobile in 1897 * Louis Sebastian Walsh, appointed Diocese of Portland, Bishop of Portland in 1906 * John Joseph Nilan, appointed Archdiocese of Hartford, Bishop of Hartford in 1910 * James Anthony Walsh, elected Superior General of Maryknoll and consecrated Titular Bishop in 1933 * Edward Francis Ryan, appointed Diocese of Burlington, Bishop of Burlington in 1944 * John Joseph Glynn, appointed Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA, Auxiliary Bishop for the Military Services, USA in 1991 *Richard Joseph Malone, appointed Bishop of Portland in 2002 and later Roman Catholic Diocese of Buffalo, Bishop of Buffalo in 2012 * Christopher J. Coyne, appointed Archdiocese of Indianapolis, Auxiliary Bishop of Indianapolis in 2011 and later Diocese of Burlington, Bishop of Burlington * Paul Fitzpatrick Russell, appointed Apostolic Nuncio to Turkey and Turkmenistan and Titular Archbishop in 2016


Churches


Seminaries

*Pope St. John XXIII National Seminary, Weston *St. John's Seminary (Massachusetts), St. John's Seminary, Brighton *Redemptoris Mater (seminary), Redemptoris Mater Archdiocesan Missionary Seminary, Brookline


Education

As of 2018, the archdiocese had 112 schools with about 34,000 students in pre-kindergarten through high school. In 1993 the archdiocese had 53,569 students in 195 archdiocesan parochial schools. Boston had the largest number of parochial schools: 48 schools with a combined total of about 16,000 students.


Superintendents

* Msgr. Albert W. Low (1961–1972) * Br. Bartholomew Varden, Xaverian Brothers, CFX (1972–1975) * Eugene F. Sullivan (1978–1984) * Sr. Kathleen Carr, Sisters of St. Joseph, CSJ (1990–2006) * Mary Grassa O'Neill (2008–2014) * Mary E. Moran (2013–2014) * Kathleen Powers Mears (2014–2019) *Thomas W. Carroll (2019–present)


Colleges and universities

*
Boston College Boston College (BC) is a private Private or privates may refer to: Music * "In Private "In Private" was the third single in a row to be a charting success for United Kingdom, British singer Dusty Springfield, after an absence of nearly tw ...
, Chestnut Hill *Emmanuel College, Boston *Marian Court College, Swampscott *Merrimack College, North Andover *Regis College, Massachusetts, Regis College, Weston


Primary and secondary schools

; Former high schools


Other facilities

The archdiocese previously used a headquarters facility in
Brighton Brighton () is a constituent part of the city A city is a large human settlement.Goodall, B. (1987) ''The Penguin Dictionary of Human Geography''. London: Penguin.Kuper, A. and Kuper, J., eds (1996) ''The Social Science Encyclopedia''. 2nd ...
but sold it to
Boston College Boston College (BC) is a private Private or privates may refer to: Music * "In Private "In Private" was the third single in a row to be a charting success for United Kingdom, British singer Dusty Springfield, after an absence of nearly tw ...
in 2004 for $107,400,000. Steward Health Care System operates the former archdiocesan hospitals of Caritas Christi Health Care.


References


External links

* **
Catholic Hierarchy Profile of the Archdiocese of Boston''Boston Globe'' / Spotlight / Abuse in the Catholic ChurchBoston Catholic Insider (critical blog)Boston Catholic Schools
{{Coord, 42, 12, 47, N, 71, 02, 29, W, type:city_source:kolossus-plwiki, display=title Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, Culture of Boston Catholic Church in Massachusetts Religious organizations established in 1808, Boston Roman Catholic dioceses and prelatures established in the 19th century, Boston Roman Catholic dioceses in the United States, Boston 1808 establishments in Massachusetts Christianity in Boston