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A materials property is an
intensive propertyIn grammar, an intensive word form is one which denotes stronger, more forceful, or more concentrated action relative to the root on which the intensive is built. Intensives are usually lexical formations, but there may be a regular process for formi ...
of some
material Material is a substance Substance may refer to: * Substance (Jainism), a term in Jain ontology to denote the base or owner of attributes * Chemical substance, a material with a definite chemical composition * Matter, anything that has mass and ...
, i.e., a
physical property A physical property is any property Property is a system of rights that gives people legal control of valuable things, and also refers to the valuable things themselves. Depending on the nature of the property, an owner of property may have ...
that does not depend on the amount of the material. These quantitative properties may be used as a
metric METRIC (Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration) is a computer model Computer simulation is the process of mathematical modelling, performed on a computer, which is designed to predict the behaviour of or th ...
by which the benefits of one material versus another can be compared, thereby aiding in
materials selectionMaterial selection is a step in the process of designing any physical object. In the context of product design, the main goal of material selection is to minimize cost while meeting product performance goals. Systematic selection of the best material ...
. A property may be a
constant Constant or The Constant may refer to: Mathematics * Constant (mathematics) In mathematics, the word constant can have multiple meanings. As an adjective, it refers to non-variance (i.e. unchanging with respect to some other Value (mathematics ...
or may be a function of one or more
independent variable Dependent and Independent variables are variables in mathematical modeling A mathematical model is a description of a system A system is a group of Interaction, interacting or interrelated elements that act according to a set of rules ...
s, such as temperature. Materials properties often vary to some degree according to the direction in the material in which they are measured, a condition referred to as
anisotropy Anisotropy () is the property of a material which allows it to change or assume different properties in different directions as opposed to isotropy. It can be defined as a difference, when measured along different axes, in a material's Physica ...
. Materials properties that relate to different physical phenomena often behave
linearly Linearity is the property of a mathematical relationship (''function (mathematics), function'') that can be graph of a function, graphically represented as a straight Line (geometry), line. Linearity is closely related to Proportionality (mathema ...
(or approximately so) in a given
operating range Operation or Operations may refer to: Science and technology * Surgical operation or surgery, in medicine * Operation (mathematics), a calculation from zero or more input values (called operands) to an output value ** Arity, number of arguments or ...
. Modeling them as linear functions can significantly simplify the differential
constitutive equation In physics Physics is the that studies , its , its and behavior through , and the related entities of and . "Physical science is that department of knowledge which relates to the order of nature, or, in other words, to the regular succ ...
s that are used to describe the property. Equations describing relevant materials properties are often used to predict the attributes of a system. The properties are measured by standardized
test method A test method is a method Method ( grc, μέθοδος, methodos) literally means a pursuit of knowledge, investigation, mode of prosecuting such inquiry, or system. In recent centuries it more often means a prescribed process for completing a task ...
s. Many such methods have been documented by their respective user communities and published through the Internet; see
ASTM International ASTM International, formerly known as American Society for Testing and Materials, is an international standards organization A standards organization, standards body, standards developing organization (SDO), or standards setting organization ( ...
.


Acoustical properties

* Acoustical absorption *
Speed of sound The speed of sound is the distance travelled per unit of time by a sound wave as it propagates through an elasticity (solid mechanics), elastic medium. At , the speed of sound in air is about , or one kilometre in or one mile in . It depends s ...
*
Sound reflection Reflection is the change in direction of a wavefront at an Interface (matter), interface between two different medium (optics), media so that the wavefront returns into the medium from which it originated. Common examples include the reflection of ...
*Sound transfer *Third order elasticity (
Acoustoelastic effectThe acoustoelastic effect is how the Sound velocity#Speed of sound in solids, sound velocities (both Longitudinal wave, longitudinal and Shear wave, shear wave velocities) of an Elasticity (physics), elastic material change if subjected to an initial ...
)


Atomic properties

* Atomic mass: Applies to all elements. The average mass of the atoms of an element measured in atomic mass unit. *
Atomic number The atomic number or proton number (symbol ''Z'') of a chemical element In chemistry, an element is a pure Chemical substance, substance consisting only of atoms that all have the same numbers of protons in their atomic nucleus, nuclei. ...
: Applies to pure elements only *
Atomic weight Relative atomic mass (symbol: ''A'') or atomic weight is a dimensionless physical quantity A physical quantity is a physical property of a material or system that can be Quantification (science), quantified by measurement. A physical quantity ...
: Applies to individual
isotope Isotopes are two or more types of atoms that have the same atomic number 300px, The Rutherford–Bohr model of the hydrogen atom () or a hydrogen-like ion (). In this model it is an essential feature that the photon energy (or frequency) of ...
s or specific mixtures of isotopes of a given element


Chemical properties

*
Corrosion resistance Corrosion is a natural process that converts a refined metal into a more chemically stable form such as oxide An oxide () is a chemical compound A chemical compound is a chemical substance composed of many identical molecules (or molecu ...
*
Hygroscopy Hygroscopy is the phenomenon of attracting and holding water Water (chemical formula H2O) is an , transparent, tasteless, odorless, and , which is the main constituent of 's and the s of all known living organisms (in which it acts as ...
*
pH
pH
* Reactivity * Specific internal surface area *
Surface energy Surface free energy or interfacial free energy or surface energy quantifies the disruption of intermolecular bonds that occurs when a surface is created. In the of s, surfaces must be intrinsically less than the bulk of a material (the molecules ...
*
Surface tension Surface tension is the tendency of liquid A liquid is a nearly incompressible In fluid mechanics Fluid mechanics is the branch of physics concerned with the mechanics Mechanics (Ancient Greek, Greek: ) is the area of physi ...

Surface tension


Electrical properties

*
Capacitance Capacitance is the ratio of the amount of electric charge Electric charge is the physical property of matter that causes it to experience a force when placed in an electromagnetic field. Electric charge can be ''positive'' or ''negative'' ( ...
*
Dielectric constant The dielectric constant (or relative permittivity) is the electric permeability of a material expressed as a ratio with the electric permeability of a vacuum. A dielectric In electromagnetism Electromagnetism is a branch of physics i ...
*
Dielectric strengthIn physics Physics (from grc, φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), physikḗ (epistḗmē), knowledge of nature, from ''phýsis'' 'nature'), , is the natural science that studies matter, its Motion (physics), motion and behavior through Spac ...
*
Electrical resistivity and conductivity Electrical resistivity (also called specific electrical resistance or volume resistivity) is a fundamental property of a material that measures how strongly it resists electric current An electric current is a stream of charged particle In p ...
*
Electric susceptibility In electricity (electromagnetism Electromagnetism is a branch of physics involving the study of the electromagnetic force, a type of physical interaction that occurs between electric charge, electrically charged particles. The electromagneti ...
* Electrocaloric coefficient * Electrostriction *Magnetoelectric polarizability * Nernst coefficient (thermoelectric effect) *
Permittivity In electromagnetism Electromagnetism is a branch of physics involving the study of the electromagnetic force, a type of physical interaction that occurs between electric charge, electrically charged particles. The electromagnetic force is car ...
*
Piezoelectric Piezoelectricity (, ) is the electric charge Electric charge is the physical property of matter that causes it to experience a force when placed in an electromagnetic field. Electric charge can be ''positive'' or ''negative'' (commonly carrie ...
constants *
Pyroelectricity Pyroelectricity (from the two Greek words ''pyr'' meaning fire, and electricity Electricity is the set of physical Physical may refer to: *Physical examination, a regular overall check-up with a doctor *Physical (album), ''Physical'' (albu ...
*
Seebeck coefficient The Seebeck coefficient (also known as thermopower, thermoelectric power, and thermoelectric sensitivity) of a material is a measure of the magnitude of an induced thermoelectric voltage in response to a temperature difference across that material, ...


Magnetic properties

*
Curie temperature In physics Physics (from grc, φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), physikḗ (epistḗmē), knowledge of nature, from ''phýsis'' 'nature'), , is the natural science that studies matter, its Motion (physics), motion and behavior throug ...
*
Diamagnetism Diamagnetic materials are repelled by a magnetic field A magnetic field is a vector field In vector calculus and physics, a vector field is an assignment of a vector to each point in a subset of space. For instance, a vector field in ...
*
Hall coefficient The Hall effect is the production of a voltage Voltage, electric potential difference, electric pressure or electric tension is the difference in electric potential The electric potential (also called the ''electric field potential'', ...

Hall coefficient
*
Hysteresis Hysteresis is the dependence of the state of a system on its history. For example, a magnet A magnet is a material or object that produces a magnetic field A magnetic field is a vector field In vector calculus and physics, a vect ...

Hysteresis
*
Magnetostriction Magnetostriction (cf. electrostriction) is a property of magnetic materials that causes them to change their shape or dimensions during the process of magnetization In classical electromagnetism Classical electromagnetism or classical elect ...
* Magnetocaloric coefficient * Magnetothermoelectric power ( magneto-Seebeck effect coefficient) *
Magnetoresistance Magnetoresistance is the tendency of a material (often ferromagnetic) to change the value of its electrical resistance in an externally-applied magnetic field. There are a variety of effects that can be called magnetoresistance. Some occur in bulk ...

Magnetoresistance
*
Maximum energy product In magnetics, the maximum energy product is an important figure-of-merit for the strength of a permanent magnet material. It is often denoted and is typically given in units of either (kilojoules per cubic meter, in SI electromagnetism) or (mega ...
* Permeability * Piezomagnetism * Pyromagnetic coefficient * Spin Hall effect


Manufacturing properties

*
CastabilityCastability is the ease of forming a quality casting. A very castable part design is easily developed, incurs minimal tooling costs, requires minimal energy, and has few rejections.Ravi, p. 2 Castability can refer to a part design or a material pr ...
: How easily a quality casting can be obtained from the material * Machinability rating *Machining
speeds and feeds File:StimUmfangsfraesen2B.png, Milling cutter paused after taking a cut. Arrows show the vectors of various velocities collectively known as speeds and feeds. The circular arrow represents the angular velocity of the spindle (rev/min), called the " ...


Mechanical properties

*
Brittleness A material is brittle if, when subjected to stress, it fracture Fracture is the separation of an object or material into two or more pieces under the action of stress. The fracture of a solid usually occurs due to the development of cer ...
: Ability of a material to break or shatter without significant deformation when under stress; opposite of plasticity, examples: glass, concrete, cast iron, ceramics etc. *
Bulk modulus The bulk modulus (K or B) of a substance is a measure of how resistant to compression that substance is. It is defined as the ratio of the infinitesimal In mathematics, infinitesimals or infinitesimal numbers are quantities that are closer to z ...
: Ratio of pressure to volumetric compression (GPa) or ratio of the infinitesimal pressure increase to the resulting relative decrease of the volume *
Coefficient of restitution The coefficient of restitution (COR), also denoted by (e), is the ratio of the final to initial relative velocity between two objects after they collide. It normally ranges from 0 to 1 where 1 would be a perfectly elastic collision. A perfectly i ...
: The ratio of the final to initial relative velocity between two objects after they collide. Range: 0-1, 1 for perfectly elastic collision. *
Compressive strength In mechanics Mechanics (Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeast Europe. Its populat ...
: Maximum stress a material can withstand before compressive failure (MPa) * Creep: The slow and gradual deformation of an object with respect to time.If the s in a material exceeds the yield point, the strain caused in the material by the application of load does not disappear totally on the removal of load. The plastic deformation caused to the material is known as creep. At high temperatures, the strain due to creep is quite appreciable. *
Ductility Ductility is a mechanical property commonly described as a material's amenability to drawing Drawing is a form of visual art The visual arts are art forms such as painting Painting is the practice of applying paint, pigment, c ...

Ductility
: Ability of a material to deform under tensile load (% elongation). It is the property of a material by which it can be drawn into wires under the action of tensile force. A ductile material must have a high degree of plasticity and strength so that large deformations can take place without failure or rupture of the material. Inductile extension, a material that exhibits a certain amount of elasticity along with a high degree of plasticity. *
Durability Durability is the ability of a physical product to remain functional, without requiring excessive maintenance or repair, when faced with the challenges of normal operation over its design lifetime. There are several measures of durability in use ...
: Ability to withstand wear, pressure, or damage; hard-wearing *
Elasticity Elasticity often refers to: *Elasticity (physics), continuum mechanics of bodies that deform reversibly under stress Elasticity may also refer to: Information technology * Elasticity (data store), the flexibility of the data model and the clu ...
: Ability of a body to resist a distorting influence or stress and to return to its original size and shape when the stress is removed *
Fatigue limit The fatigue limit or endurance limit is the stress level below which an infinite number of loading cycles can be applied to a material without causing fatigue Fatigue describes a state of tiredness that does not resolve with rest or sleep. ...
: Maximum stress a material can withstand under repeated loading (MPa) *
Flexibility Stiffness is the extent to which an object resists deformation Deformation can refer to: * Deformation (engineering), changes in an object's shape or form due to the application of a force or forces. ** Deformation (mechanics), such changes co ...

Flexibility
: Ability of an object to bend or deform in response to an applied force; pliability; complementary to stiffness *
Flexural modulusIn mechanics Mechanics (Ancient Greek, Greek: ) is the area of physics concerned with the motions of physical objects, more specifically the relationships among force, matter, and motion. Forces applied to objects result in Displacement (vector) ...
*
Flexural strength Flexural strength, also known as modulus of rupture, or bend strength, or transverse rupture strength is a material property, defined as the Stress (mechanics), stress in a material just before it Yield (engineering), yields in a flexure test. The ...

Flexural strength
: Maximum bending stress a material can withstand before failure (MPa) *
Fracture toughness In materials science The interdisciplinary Interdisciplinarity or interdisciplinary studies involves the combination of two or more academic disciplines into one activity (e.g., a research project). It draws knowledge from several other ...

Fracture toughness
: Ability of a material containing a crack to resist fracture (J/m^2) *
Friction coefficient Friction is the force In physics Physics (from grc, φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), physikḗ (epistḗmē), knowledge of nature, from ''phýsis'' 'nature'), , is the natural science that studies matter, its Motion (physics), ...
: The amount of force normal to surface which converts to force resisting relative movement of contacting surfaces between material pair *
Hardness Hardness (antonym: softness) is a measure of the resistance to localized plastic deformation In engineering, deformation refers to the change in size or shape of an object. ''Displacements'' are the ''absolute'' change in position of a point ...
: Ability to withstand surface indentation and scratching (e.g. Brinell hardness number) *
Malleability Ductility is a mechanical property commonly described as a material's amenability to drawing Drawing is a form of visual art in which an artist uses instruments to mark paper Paper is a thin sheet material produced by mechanically a ...
: Ability of the material to be flattened into thin sheets under applications of heavy compressive forces without cracking by hot or cold working means.This property of a material allows it to expand in all directions without rupture. *
Mass diffusivity Diffusivity, mass diffusivity or diffusion coefficient is a proportionality constant between the molar flux due to molecular diffusion File:DiffusionMicroMacro.gif, 250px, Diffusion from a microscopic and macroscopic point of view. Initially, ...
: Ability of one substance to diffuse through another *
Plasticity Plasticity may refer to: Science * Plasticity (physics), in engineering and physics, the propensity of a solid material to undergo permanent deformation under load * Neuroplasticity, in neuroscience, how entire brain structures, and the brain its ...
: Ability of a material to undergo irreversible or permanent deformations without breaking or rupturing; opposite of brittleness *
Poisson's ratio In materials science and solid mechanics, Poisson's ratio \nu (Nu (letter), nu) is a measure of the Poisson effect, the Deformation (engineering), deformation (expansion or contraction) of a material in directions perpendicular to the specific dir ...
: Ratio of lateral strain to axial strain (no units) *
Resilience Resilience, resilient, resiliency, or ''variation'', may refer to: Science Ecology * Ecological resilience In ecology, resilience is the capacity of an ecosystem to respond to a perturbation or disturbance by resisting damage and recovering ...
: Ability of a material to absorb energy when it is deformed elastically (MPa); combination of strength and elasticity *
Shear modulus In materials science The interdisciplinary Interdisciplinarity or interdisciplinary studies involves the combination of two or more academic disciplines into one activity (e.g., a research project). It draws knowledge from several other ...
: Ratio of shear stress to shear strain (MPa) *
Shear strength In engineering Engineering is the use of scientific principles to design and build machines, structures, and other items, including bridges, tunnels, roads, vehicles, and buildings. The discipline of engineering encompasses a broad rang ...
: Maximum shear stress a material can withstand *
Slip Slip or SLIP may refer to: Science and technology Biology * Slip (fish) Sole is a fish belonging to several families. Generally speaking, they are members of the family Soleidae, but, outside Europe, the name ''sole'' is also applied to vario ...
: A tendency of a material's particles to undergo plastic deformation due to a dislocation motion within the material. Common in Crystals. * Specific modulus: Modulus per unit volume (MPa/m^3) *
Specific strength The specific strength is a material's strength (force per unit area at failure) divided by its density The density (more precisely, the volumetric mass density; also known as specific mass), of a substance is its mass per unit volume. The sym ...
: Strength per unit density (Nm/kg) *
Specific weight The specific weight, also known as the unit weight, is the weight In science Science () is a systematic enterprise that Scientific method, builds and organizes knowledge in the form of Testability, testable explanations and predictions abo ...
: Weight per unit volume (N/m^3) *
Stiffness Stiffness is the extent to which an object resists deformation Deformation can refer to: * Deformation (engineering), changes in an object's shape or form due to the application of a force or forces. ** Deformation (mechanics), such changes co ...
: Ability of an object to resist deformation in response to an applied force; rigidity; complementary to flexibility *
Surface roughness Surface roughness, often shortened to roughness, is a component of surface texture Surface finish, also known as surface texture or surface topography, is the nature of a interface (matter), surface as defined by the three characteristics of l ...

Surface roughness
: The deviations in the direction of the normal vector of a real surface from its ideal form *
Tensile strength Ultimate tensile strength (UTS), often shortened to tensile strength (TS), ultimate strength, or F_\text within equations, is the maximum stress that a material can withstand while being stretched or pulled before breaking. In brittle tensi ...
: Maximum tensile stress of a material can withstand before failure (MPa) *
Toughness In materials science The interdisciplinary Interdisciplinarity or interdisciplinary studies involves the combination of two or more academic discipline An academic discipline or academic field is a subdivision of knowledge that is ...
: Ability of a material to absorb energy (or withstand shock) and plastically deform without fracturing (or rupturing); a material's resistance to fracture when stressed; combination of strength and plasticity *
Viscosity The viscosity of a fluid In physics Physics is the that studies , its , its and behavior through , and the related entities of and . "Physical science is that department of knowledge which relates to the order of nature, or, ...

Viscosity
: A fluid's resistance to gradual deformation by tensile or shear stress; thickness *
Yield strength In materials science The interdisciplinary Interdisciplinarity or interdisciplinary studies involves the combination of two or more academic disciplines into one activity (e.g., a research project). It draws knowledge from several oth ...
: The stress at which a material starts to yield plastically (MPa) *
Young's modulus Young's modulus E, the Young modulus, or the modulus of elasticity An elastic modulus (also known as modulus of elasticity) is a quantity that measures an object or substance's resistance to being deformed elastically (i.e., non-permanently) wh ...
: Ratio of linear stress to linear strain (MPa)


Optical properties

*
Absorbance In optics Optics is the branch of physics that studies the behaviour and properties of light, including its interactions with matter and the construction of optical instruments, instruments that use or Photodetector, detect it. Optics usuall ...
: How strongly a chemical attenuates light *
Birefringence Birefringence is the property of a material having a that depends on the and propagation direction of . These optically materials are said to be birefringent (or birefractive). The birefringence is often quantified as the maximum difference b ...

Birefringence
*
Color Color (American English American English (AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US), sometimes called United States English or U.S. English, is the set of varieties of the English language native to the United States. Currently, American Engli ...

Color
*
Electro-optic effect * # An electro-optic effect is a change in the optical properties of a material in response to an electric field that varies slowly compared with the frequency of light. The term encompasses a number of distinct phenomena, which can be subdivide ...
*
Luminosity Luminosity is an absolute measure of radiated electromagnetic power (light), the radiant power emitted by a light-emitting object over time. In astronomy, luminosity is the total amount of electromagnetic energy emitted per unit of time by a s ...

Luminosity
*
Optical activity Optical rotation, also known as polarization rotation or circular birefringence, is the rotation of the orientation of the plane of polarization Polarization or polarisation may refer to: In the physical sciences *Polarization (waves), the abi ...
*
Photoelasticity Photoelasticity describes changes in the optical propertiesThe optical properties of a material define how it interacts with light Light or visible light is electromagnetic radiation within the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that c ...

Photoelasticity
*
Photosensitivity Photosensitivity is the amount to which an object reacts upon receiving photon The photon ( el, φῶς, phōs, light) is a type of elementary particle In , an elementary particle or fundamental particle is a that is not composed of other par ...
*
Reflectivity The reflectance of the surface of a material is its effectiveness in reflecting radiant energy In physics Physics is the natural science that studies matter, its Elementary particle, fundamental constituents, its Motion (physics), motion ...
*
Refractive index In optics Optics is the branch of physics Physics is the that studies , its , its and behavior through , and the related entities of and . "Physical science is that department of knowledge which relates to the order of nature, or ...

Refractive index
*
Scattering Scattering is a term used in physics to describe a wide range of physical processes where moving particles or radiation of some form, such as light Light or visible light is electromagnetic radiation within the portion of the electromagneti ...

Scattering
*
Transmittance File:Atmosfaerisk spredning.png, Earth's atmospheric transmittance over 1 nautical mile sea level path (infrared region). Because of the natural radiation of the hot atmosphere, the intensity of radiation is different from the transmitted part. ...

Transmittance


Radiological properties

*
Neutron cross-section In nuclear and particle physics Particle physics (also known as high energy physics) is a branch of physics Physics (from grc, φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), physikḗ (epistḗmē), knowledge of nature, from ''phýsis'' 'natur ...
*
Specific activity Specific activity is the activity per quantity of a radionuclide A radionuclide (radioactive nuclide, radioisotope or radioactive isotope) is a nuclide A nuclide (or nucleide, from atomic nucleus, nucleus, also known as nuclear species) is ...
*
Half life Half-life (symbol ''t''1⁄2) is the time required for a quantity to reduce to half of its initial value. The term is commonly used in nuclear physics to describe how quickly unstable atoms undergo radioactive decay or how long stable atoms sur ...

Half life


Thermal properties

* Binary phase diagram *
Boiling point The boiling point of a substance is the temperature at which the vapor pressure 280px, The ''pistol test tube'' experiment. The tube contains alcohol and is closed with a piece of cork. By heating the alcohol, the vapors fill in the space, inc ...
*
Coefficient of thermal expansion Thermal expansion is the tendency of matter to change its shape A shape or figure is the form of an object or its external boundary, outline, or external surface File:Water droplet lying on a damask.jpg, Water droplet lying on a damask ...
*
Critical temperature Critical or Critically may refer to: *Critical, or critical but stable, medical state Medical state is a term used to describe a hospital A hospital is a health care institution providing patient treatment with specialized medical and nursing ...
*
Curie point In physics Physics is the natural science that studies matter, its Elementary particle, fundamental constituents, its Motion (physics), motion and behavior through Spacetime, space and time, and the related entities of energy and forc ...
* Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature *
Emissivity The emissivity of the surface of a material is its effectiveness in emitting energy as thermal radiation Thermal radiation is electromagnetic radiation In physics Physics is the natural science that studies matter, its Elementar ...
*
Eutectic point A eutectic system ( ) from the Greek ( 'well') and ( 'melting') is a homogeneous mixture In chemistry, a mixture is a material made up of two or more different chemical substances which are not chemically combined. A mixture is the physical ...
*
Flammability A combustible material is something that can burn (i.e., ''combust'') in air. A combustible material is flammable if it ignites easily at ambient temperatures. In other words, a combustible material ignites with some effort and a flammable mat ...
*
Flash point In chemistry Chemistry is the study of the properties and behavior of . It is a that covers the that make up matter to the composed of s, s and s: their composition, structure, properties, behavior and the changes they undergo durin ...
*
Glass transition temperature The glass–liquid transition, or glass transition, is the gradual and reversible transition in amorphous In condensed matter physics Condensed matter physics is the field of that deals with the macroscopic and microscopic physical propert ...
*
Heat of vaporization The enthalpy of vaporization (symbol ), also known as the (latent) heat of vaporization or heat of evaporation, is the amount of energy (enthalpy Enthalpy , a property of a thermodynamic system, is the sum of the system's internal energy an ...
* Inversion temperature *
Melting point The melting point (or, rarely, liquefaction point) of a substance is the temperature Temperature ( ) is a physical quantity that expresses hot and cold. It is the manifestation of thermal energy Thermal radiation in visible light can b ...

Melting point
*Thermal conductivity *Thermal diffusivity *Thermal expansion *Triple point *Vapor pressure *Specific heat capacity


See also

*Physical property *Strength of materials *Supervenience *List of thermodynamic properties


References

{{DEFAULTSORT:List Of Materials Properties Chemical properties Materials science Physical quantities