HOME

TheInfoList




John Murray is a British publisher, known for the authors it has published in its history, including
Jane Austen Jane Austen (; 16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817) was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry The landed gentry, or the ''gentry'', is a l ...

Jane Austen
,
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a British writer and physician. He created the character Sherlock Holmes Sherlock Holmes () is a fictional detective created by British author Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir ...
,
Lord Byron George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, ( el, Λόρδος Βύρωνας, translit=Lórdos Výronas, translit-std=ISO; 22 January 1788 – 19 April 1824), simply known as Lord Byron, was an English poet and peer Peer may refer to: Socio ...
,
Charles Lyell Sir Charles Lyell, 1st Baronet, (14 November 1797 – 22 February 1875) was a Scottish geologist who demonstrated the power of known natural causes in explaining the earth Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astro ...

Charles Lyell
,
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German German(s) may refer to: Common uses * of or related to Germany * Germans, Germanic ethnic group, citizens of Germany or people of German ancestry * For citizens of G ...

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
,
Herman Melville Herman Melville (Name change, born Melvill; August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, and poet of the American Renaissance (literature), American Renaissance period. Among his best-known works are ...

Herman Melville
,
Edward Whymper Edward Whymper FRSE Fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (FRSE) is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Scotland's national academy of science and Literature, letters, judged to be "eminently distingu ...

Edward Whymper
,
Thomas Malthus Thomas Robert Malthus (; 13/14 February 1766 – 23 December 1834) was an English cleric Clergy are formal leaders within established religion Religion is a - of designated and practices, , s, s, , , , , or , that relates humanit ...

Thomas Malthus
,
David Ricardo David Ricardo (18 April 1772 – 11 September 1823) was a British Political economy, political economist, one of the most influential of the Classical economics, classical economists along with Thomas Malthus, Adam Smith and James Mill. He was ...

David Ricardo
, and
Charles Darwin Charles Robert Darwin (; ; 12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist Natural history is a domain of inquiry involving organism In biology, an organism () is any organic, life, living system that fu ...

Charles Darwin
. Since 2004, it has been owned by conglomerate
LagardèreLagardère may refer to: * Lagardère Group, a French media group * Jean-Luc Lagardère (1928–2003), French engineer and businessman and CEO of the Lagardère Group * Arnaud Lagardère (born 1961), French businessman and son of Jean-Luc Lagardère ...
under the
Hachette UK Hachette () is a French publishing, publisher. Founded in 1826 by Louis Hachette as Brédif, the company later became L. Hachette et Compagnie, Librairie Hachette, Hachette SA and Hachette Livre in France. After acquiring an Australian publishe ...
brand. Business publisher Nicholas Brealey became an imprint of John Murray in 2015.


History

The business was founded in London in 1768 by John Murray (1737–1793), an
Edinburgh Edinburgh (; sco, Edinburgh; gd, Dùn Èideann ) is the capital city of Scotland and one of its 32 Council areas of Scotland, council areas. Historically part of the county of Midlothian (interchangeably Edinburghshire before 1921), it is ...

Edinburgh
-born
Royal Marines The Corps of Royal Marines (RM) is an amphibious Amphibious means able to use either land or water. In particular it may refer to: * ''Amphibious'' (film), a 2010 film * Amphibious aircraft An amphibious aircraft or amphibian is an air ...
officer, who built up a list of authors including
Isaac D'Israeli Isaac D'Israeli (11 May 1766 – 19 January 1848) was a British British may refer to: Peoples, culture, and language * British people The British people, or Britons, are the citizens of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Norther ...
and published the ''
English Review ''The English Review'' was an English-language literary magazine published in London from 1908 to 1937. At its peak, the journal published some of the leading writers of its day. History The magazine was started by 1908 by Ford Madox Ford, Ford Ma ...
''. John Murray the elder was one of the founding sponsors of the London evening newspaper '' The Star'' in 1788. He was succeeded by his son
John Murray II Image:John Murray.jpg, John Murray John Murray (27 November 1778 – 27 June 1843) was a Scotland, Scottish publisher and member of the John Murray (publishing house), John Murray publishing house. Life The publishing house was founded by Murray's ...
, who made the publishing house important and influential. He was a friend of many leading writers of the day and launched the ''
Quarterly Review The ''Quarterly Review'' was a literary and political periodical founded in March 1809 by the well known London London is the capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case (or just case) is the distinctio ...
'' in 1809. He was the publisher of
Jane Austen Jane Austen (; 16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817) was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry The landed gentry, or the ''gentry'', is a l ...

Jane Austen
, Sir
Walter Scott Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet (15 August 1771 – 21 September 1832), was a Scottish historical novelist, poet, playwright and historian. Many of his works remain classics of European and Scottish literature Scottish literature is literatu ...

Walter Scott
,
Washington Irving Washington Irving (April 3, 1783 – November 28, 1859) was an American short-story writer, essayist, biographer, historian, and diplomat of the early 19th century. He is best known for his short stories "Rip Van Winkle ''Rip Van Winkle'' st ...

Washington Irving
,
George Crabbe George Crabbe ( ; 24 December 1754 – 3 February 1832) was an English poet, surgeon and clergyman. He is best known for his early use of the realistic narrative form and his descriptions of middle and working-class life and people. In the 177 ...

George Crabbe
,
Mary Somerville Mary Somerville (; née__NOTOC__ A birth name is the name of the person given upon their birth. The term may be applied to the surname In some cultures, a surname, family name, or last name is the portion of one's personal name that in ...

Mary Somerville
and many others. His home and office at 50
Albemarle Street Albemarle Street is a street in Mayfair Mayfair is an affluent area in the West End of London towards the eastern edge of Hyde Park, London, Hyde Park, in the City of Westminster, between Oxford Street, Regent Street, Piccadilly and Park L ...
in
Mayfair Mayfair is an affluent area in the West End of London towards the eastern edge of Hyde Park, London, Hyde Park, in the City of Westminster, between Oxford Street, Regent Street, Piccadilly and Park Lane. It is one of the most expensive distric ...

Mayfair
was the centre of a literary circle, fostered by Murray's tradition of "Four o'clock friends", afternoon tea with his writers. Murray's most notable author was
Lord Byron George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, ( el, Λόρδος Βύρωνας, translit=Lórdos Výronas, translit-std=ISO; 22 January 1788 – 19 April 1824), simply known as Lord Byron, was an English poet and peer Peer may refer to: Socio ...
, who became a close friend and correspondent of his. Murray published many of his major works, paying him over £20,000 in rights. On 10 March 1812 Murray published Byron's second book, ''
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage ''Childe Harold's Pilgrimage'' is a long narrative poem Narrative poetry is a form of poetry Poetry (derived from the Greek language, Greek ''poiesis'', "making") is a form of literature that uses aesthetics, aesthetic and often rhythmi ...
'', which sold out in five days, leading to Byron's observation "I awoke one morning and found myself famous". On 17 May 1824 Murray participated in one of the most notorious acts in the annals of literature. Byron had given him the manuscript of his personal memoirs to publish later on. Together with five of Byron's friends and executors, he decided to destroy Byron's manuscripts because he thought the scandalous details would damage Byron's reputation. With only
Thomas Moore Thomas Moore (28 May 1779 – 25 February 1852) was an Irish writer, poet, and lyricist celebrated for his ''Irish Melodies''. Their setting of English-language verse to old Irish tunes marked the transition in popular Irish culture from Irish ...

Thomas Moore
objecting, the two volumes of memoirs were dismembered and burnt in the fireplace at Murray's office. It remains unknown what they contained.
John Murray III John Murray III (1808–1892) was a British publisher, third of the name at the John Murray (publishing house), John Murray company founded in London in 1777. Life The eldest son of John Murray II (1778–1843) by Anne Elliott, daughter of Charle ...

John Murray III
(1808–1892) continued the business and published
Charles Eastlake's
Charles Eastlake's
first English translation of
Goethe's
Goethe's
Theory of Colours ''Theory of Colours'' (German: ''Zur Farbenlehre'') is a book by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe about the poet's views on the nature of color, colours and how these are perceived by humans. It was published in German in 1810 and in English in 1840. ...
(1840),
David Livingstone David Livingstone (; 19 March 1813 – 1 May 1873) was a Scottish physician, Congregationalist, and pioneer Christian missionary A missionary is a member of a Religious denomination, religious group sent into an area to promote thei ...

David Livingstone
's ''Missionary Travels'' (1857), and
Charles Darwin Charles Robert Darwin (; ; 12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist Natural history is a domain of inquiry involving organism In biology, an organism () is any organic, life, living system that fu ...

Charles Darwin
's ''
Origin of Species ''On the Origin of Species'' (or, more completely, ''On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life''),The book's full original title was ''On the Origin of Species by Me ...

Origin of Species
'' (1859). Murray III contracted with
Herman Melville Herman Melville (Name change, born Melvill; August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, and poet of the American Renaissance (literature), American Renaissance period. Among his best-known works are ...

Herman Melville
to publish Melville's first two books, ''
Typee ''Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life'' is the first book by American writer Herman Melville Herman Melville (Name change, born Melvill; August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, and poet of the Am ...
'' (1846) and ''
Omoo ''Omoo: A Narrative of Adventures in the South Seas'' is the second book by American writer Herman Melville Herman Melville (Name change, born Melvill; August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, ...
'' (1847) in England; both books were presented as nonfiction travel narratives in Murray's '' Home and Colonial Library'' series, alongside such works as the 1845 second edition of Darwin's '' Journal of Researches'' from his travels on . John Murray III also started the '' Murray Handbooks'' in 1836, a series of travel guides from which modern-day guides are directly descended. The rights to these guides were sold around 1900 and subsequently acquired in 1915 by the
Blue Guides The Blue Guides are a series of detailed and authoritative Guide book, travel guidebooks focused on art, architecture, and (where relevant) archaeology along with the history and context necessary to understand them. A modicum of practical trav ...
. His successor Sir John Murray IV (1851–1928) was publisher to
Queen Victoria Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland There have been 12 British monarchs since the political union of the Kingdom of England The Kingdom of En ...

Queen Victoria
. Among other works, he published
Murray's Magazine ''Murray's Magazine'' was a monthly magazine published by the John Murray (publishing house), John Murray publishing house. Sixty issues were published, from January 1887 through to December 1891. It was priced at 1/- (one shilling). The magazine ...
from 1887 until 1891. From 1904 he published the Wisdom of the East book series. Competitor Smith, Elder & Co. was acquired in 1917. His son Sir John Murray V (1884–1967), grandson John Murray VI (John Arnaud Robin Grey Murray; 1909–1993) and great-grandson John Murray VII (John Richmond Grey Murray; 1941–) continued the business until it was taken over. In 2002, John Murray was acquired by
Hodder Headline Headline Publishing Group is a British publishing brand and former company. It was founded in 1986 by Tim Hely Hutchinson. In 1993, Headline bought Hodder & Stoughton and the company became Hodder Headline Ltd. In 1999, Hodder Headline was acquire ...
, which was itself acquired in 2004 by the French conglomerate
Lagardère Group Lagardère S.A. () is an international group with operations in over 40 countries. It is headquartered in the 16th arrondissement of Paris. The group was created in 1992 as Matra, Hachette & Lagardère. It once covered a broad range of industrie ...
. Since then, it has been an imprint under Lagardère brand
Hachette UK Hachette () is a French publishing, publisher. Founded in 1826 by Louis Hachette as Brédif, the company later became L. Hachette et Compagnie, Librairie Hachette, Hachette SA and Hachette Livre in France. After acquiring an Australian publishe ...
. In 2015, business publisher Nicholas Brealey became an imprint of John Murray.


John Murray archive

The John Murray Archive was offered for sale to the nation by John Murray VII for £31 million and the
National Library of Scotland The National Library of Scotland (NLS) ( gd, Leabharlann Nàiseanta na h-Alba, sco, Naitional Leebrar o Scotland) is the legal deposit library of Scotland and is one of the country's National Collections. As one of the largest libraries in the ...
has acquired it, including the manuscript of
Charles Darwin Charles Robert Darwin (; ; 12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist Natural history is a domain of inquiry involving organism In biology, an organism () is any organic, life, living system that fu ...

Charles Darwin
's ''
Origin of Species ''On the Origin of Species'' (or, more completely, ''On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life''),The book's full original title was ''On the Origin of Species by Me ...
''. On 26 January 2005, it was announced that the National Library was to be given £17.7m by the
Heritage Lottery Fund The National Lottery Heritage Fund, formerly the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF), distributes a share of National Lottery funding, supporting a wide range of heritage projects across the United Kingdom. History The fund's predecessor bodies were ...
towards the £31.2m price offered by John Murray on condition the Library digitise the materials and make them available. The
Scottish Government The Scottish Government ( gd, Riaghaltas na h-Alba, ) is the Devolution in the United Kingdom, devolved government of Scotland. It was formed in 1999 as the Scottish Executive following the 1997 Scottish devolution referendum, 1997 referendum on S ...
agreed to contribute £8.3m, with the Library setting a £6.5m fundraising target for the remainder.


John Murray timeline

* 1768 – John MacMurray, a former lieutenant of the Marines, buys a bookselling business at 32 Fleet Street. He changes his name to Murray and uses his naval contacts to build up a thriving business * 1806 – The first bestseller, ''
A New System of Domestic Cookery ''A New System of Domestic Cookery'', first published in 1806 by Maria Rundell Maria Eliza Rundell (1745 – 16 December 1828) was an English writer. Little is known about most of her life, but in 1805, when she was over 60, she sent an ...
, by A Lady'' (Maria Rundell), was published, with
second edition
two years later. * 1809 – The influential periodical the ''
Quarterly Review The ''Quarterly Review'' was a literary and political periodical founded in March 1809 by the well known London London is the capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case (or just case) is the distinctio ...
'' founded * 1811 – ''
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage ''Childe Harold's Pilgrimage'' is a long narrative poem Narrative poetry is a form of poetry Poetry (derived from the Greek language, Greek ''poiesis'', "making") is a form of literature that uses aesthetics, aesthetic and often rhythmi ...
'' by
Lord Byron George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, ( el, Λόρδος Βύρωνας, translit=Lórdos Výronas, translit-std=ISO; 22 January 1788 – 19 April 1824), simply known as Lord Byron, was an English poet and peer Peer may refer to: Socio ...

Lord Byron
published * 1812 – John Murray moved to 50
Albemarle Street Albemarle Street is a street in Mayfair Mayfair is an affluent area in the West End of London towards the eastern edge of Hyde Park, London, Hyde Park, in the City of Westminster, between Oxford Street, Regent Street, Piccadilly and Park L ...
, its home for the next 191 years * 1815 –
Jane Austen Jane Austen (; 16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817) was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry The landed gentry, or the ''gentry'', is a l ...

Jane Austen
decides she would like to move to Murray with ''
Emma Emma may refer to: * Emma (given name) Film * Emma (1932 film), ''Emma'' (1932 film), a comedy-drama film by Clarence Brown * Emma (1996 theatrical film), ''Emma'' (1996 theatrical film), a film starring Gwyneth Paltrow * Emma (1996 TV film), ''E ...
'', published in 1815 * 1816 –
Coleridge Samuel Taylor Coleridge (; 21 October 177225 July 1834) was an English poet, literary criticism, literary critic, philosopher and theologian who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romanticism, Romantic Movement in Engla ...

Coleridge
moved to John Murray for ''Christabel and Other Poems'', which included 'Kubla Khan' * 1830 - First part of the three volume ''
Principles of Geology A principle is a proposition or value that is a guide for behavior or evaluation. In law, it is a Legal rule, rule that has to be or usually is to be followed. It can be desirably followed, or it can be an inevitable consequence of something, such ...
'' by
Charles Lyell Sir Charles Lyell, 1st Baronet, (14 November 1797 – 22 February 1875) was a Scottish geologist who demonstrated the power of known natural causes in explaining the earth Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astro ...

Charles Lyell
published () * 1836 – The first guide books, ''
Murray's Handbooks ''Murray's Handbooks for Travellers'' were travel guide book A guide book or travel guide is "a book of information about a place designed for the use of visitors or tourists". It will usually include information about sights, accommodation, ...
'', published by John Murray III * 1849 – A groundbreaking observational study on the
Sikh Sikhs ( or ; pa, ਸਿੱਖ, ', ) are people who adhere to Sikhism, a Monotheism, monotheistic religion that originated in the late 15th century in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent, based on the revelation of Guru Nanak. The te ...
people A people is any plurality of person A person (plural people or persons) is a being that has certain capacities or attributes such as reason Reason is the capacity of consciously applying logic Logic is an interdisciplinary field wh ...

people
is published. This comprehensive account arguably foreshadowed the
British Empire The British Empire was composed of the dominions, Crown colony, colonies, protectorates, League of Nations mandate, mandates, and other Dependent territory, territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states. ...

British Empire
's first large-scale attempt at using the scientific method to civilise populations; this methodological approach later became known as
Eugenics Eugenics ( ; ) is a set of beliefs and practices that aim to improve the genetic quality of a human population Humans (''Homo sapiens'') are the most abundant and widespread species of primate, characterized by bipedality, bipedalism ...
. * 1857 –
David Livingstone David Livingstone (; 19 March 1813 – 1 May 1873) was a Scottish physician, Congregationalist, and pioneer Christian missionary A missionary is a member of a Religious denomination, religious group sent into an area to promote thei ...

David Livingstone
's ''Missionary Travels'', published – one of the many great 19th-century publications of exploration from John Murray * 1859 – ''
On the Origin of Species ''On the Origin of Species'' (or, more completely, ''On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life''),The book's full original title was ''On the Origin of Species by Me ...
'' by
Charles Darwin Charles Robert Darwin (; ; 12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist Natural history is a domain of inquiry involving organism In biology, an organism () is any organic, life, living system that fu ...

Charles Darwin
published * 1859 – The first self-help book, ''Samuel Smiles's Self Help'', published * 1863 –
Henry Walter Bates Henry Walter Bates (8 February 1825, in Leicester – 16 February 1892, in London) was an English natural history, naturalist and explorer who gave the first scientific account of mimicry in animals. He was most famous for his expedition to the ...

Henry Walter Bates
's ''
The Naturalist on the River Amazons ''The Naturalist on the River Amazons'', subtitle (titling), subtitled ''A Record of the Adventures, Habits of Animals, Sketches of Brazilian and Indian Life, and Aspects of Nature under the Equator, during Eleven Years of Travel'', is an 1863 ...
'' published * 1865 – ''Narrative of an Expedition to the Zambesi and its Tributaries; and of the Discovery of the Lakes Shirwa and Nyassa. 1858-1864'' by
David David (; ) (traditional spelling), , ''Dāwūd''; grc-koi, Δαυΐδ, Dauíd; la, Davidus, David; gez , ዳዊት, ''Dawit''; xcl, Դաւիթ, ''Dawitʿ''; cu, Давíдъ, ''Davidŭ''; possibly meaning "beloved one". is described in th ...

David
and Charles Livingstone published * 1871 –
Edward Whymper Edward Whymper FRSE Fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (FRSE) is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Scotland's national academy of science and Literature, letters, judged to be "eminently distingu ...

Edward Whymper
''Scrambles Amongst the Alps in the Years 1860-69'', The first ascent of the
Matterhorn The (, ; it, Cervino ; french: Cervin ) is a mountain of the Alps, straddling the Main chain of the Alps, main watershed and border between Switzerland and Italy. It is a large, near-symmetric pyramidal peak in the extended Monte Rosa area of ...

Matterhorn
in 1865 * 1891 –
Edward Whymper Edward Whymper FRSE Fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (FRSE) is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Scotland's national academy of science and Literature, letters, judged to be "eminently distingu ...

Edward Whymper
''Travels Amongst the Great Andes of the Equator'', Two volumes recording ascents in the Ecuadorian Andes of
Chimborazo Chimborazo () is a currently inactive stratovolcano A stratovolcano, also known as a composite volcano, is a conical A cone is a three-dimensional space, three-dimensional geometric shape that tapers smoothly from a flat base (frequently, ...

Chimborazo
,
Cotopaxi Cotopaxi is an active stratovolcano in the Andes, Andes Mountains, located in Latacunga city of Cotopaxi Province, about south of Quito, and northeast of the city of Latacunga, Ecuador. It is the second highest summit in Ecuador, reaching a h ...

Cotopaxi
, Cayambe_(volcano), and other Andean Peaks * 1912 – June, Published ''Behind The Night Light'' by
Nancy Price Nancy Price, CBE (3 February 1880 – 31 March 1970), was an English actress on stage and screen, author and theatre director. Her acting career began in a repertory theatre company before progressing to the London stage, silent films, sound film, ...
, which was reprinted in June, 1912, September,1912, January, 1913. * 1921 – ''An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English'' by
Ernest Weekley Ernest Weekley (27 April 1865 – 7 May 1954) was a British philologist Philology is the study of language in oral and writing, written historical sources; it is the intersection of textual criticism, literary criticism, history, and linguistic ...
published * 1934 – Dr.
Julius Kugy
Julius Kugy
''Alpine Pilgrimage'' (1st edition (English) 1934), Klugy's literary masterpiece on the
Julian Alps The Julian Alps ( sl, Julijske Alpe, it, Alpi Giulie, , ) are a mountain range of the Southern Limestone Alps that stretch from northeastern Italy to Slovenia, where they rise to 2,864 m at Mount Triglav, the highest peak in Slovenia and of the f ...
of Slovenia as translated by H. E. G. Tyndale (Henry Edmund Guise Tyndale) * 1938 - Daniele Varè's biography ''The Laughing Diplomat'' is published * 1958 –
John Betjeman Sir John Betjeman (; 28 August 190619 May 1984) was an English poet, writer, and broadcaster. He was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom, Poet Laureate from 1972 until his death. He was a founding member of The Victorian Society and a passionat ...

John Betjeman
's ''Collected Poems'' published and has sold over 2 million copies to date * 1967 – Last issue of the ''
Quarterly Review The ''Quarterly Review'' was a literary and political periodical founded in March 1809 by the well known London London is the capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case (or just case) is the distinctio ...
'' published * 1969 – The first TV tie-in,
Kenneth Clark Kenneth Mackenzie Clark, Baron Clark (13 July 1903 – 21 May 1983) was a British art historian, museum director, and broadcaster. After running two important art galleries in the 1930s and 1940s, he came to wider public notice on television, p ...
's ''Civilisation'', published * 1975 –
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala Ruth Prawer Jhabvala (7 May 19273 April 2013) was a German-born British and American Booker Prize, Booker prize-winning novelist, short story writer and two-time Academy Awards, Academy Award-winning screenwriter. She is perhaps best known for ...

Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
's ''Heat and Dust'' wins the
Man Booker Prize The Booker Prize, formerly known as the Booker Prize for Fiction (1969–2001) and the Man Booker Prize (2002–2019), is a literary prize A literary award or literary prize is an award presented in recognition of a particularly lauded liter ...
* 1977 – The "greatest travel book of the twentieth century", ''A Time of Gifts'' by
Patrick Leigh Fermor Sir Patrick Michael Leigh Fermor (11 February 1915 – 10 June 2011) was an English writer, scholar, soldier and polyglot in Seattle labeled in four languages: English, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Spanish ( Tagalog also uses the Spanish w ...

Patrick Leigh Fermor
published * 2002 – John Murray leaves family hands after seven generations * 2002 – ''Peacemakers'' by Margaret MacMillan wins the
Samuel Johnson Prize The Baillie Gifford Prize for Non-Fiction, formerly the Samuel Johnson Prize, is an annual British book prize for the best non-fiction writing in the English language. It was founded in 1999 following the demise of the NCR Book Award. With its m ...
, the
Duff Cooper Prize The Duff Cooper Prize is a literary prize awarded annually for the best work of history History (from Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the ...
and the
Hessell-Tiltman Prize The Hessell-Tiltman History Prize is awarded to the best work of non-fiction of historical content covering a period up to and including World War II, and published in the year of the award. The books are to be of high literary merit, but not pri ...
* 2003 – The first new acquisition since the company became part of Hodder Headline (now Hachette), ''A Million Little Pieces'' by James Frey, becomes a perennial and controversial bestseller * 2004 – Rebirth of the John Murray fiction list with
Neil Jordan Neil Patrick Jordan (born 25 February 1950) is an Irish film director, screenwriter, novelist and short-story writer. His first book, ''Night in Tunisia'', won a Somerset Maugham Award and the Guardian Fiction Prize in 1979. He won an 65th Acad ...
's ''Shade'' * 2005 – ''Beasts of No Nation'' by
Uzodinma Iweala Image:Iweala FfmBuchmesse171008.jpg, Uzodinma Iweala during a public reading at the Frankfurt Book Fair on October 17, 2008. Uzodinma Iweala (born November 5, 1982) is a Nigerian Americans, Nigerian-American author and medical doctor. His debut nove ...
wins
John Llewellyn Rhys Prize The John Llewellyn Rhys Prize was a literary prize awarded annually for the best work of literature (fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama) by an author from the Commonwealth of Nations, Commonwealth aged 35 or under, written in English and publish ...
* 2007 – ''Mister Pip'' by Lloyd Jones becomes a global bestseller, wins the
Commonwealth Writers' Prize Commonwealth Foundation The Commonwealth Foundation (CF) is an intergovernmental organisation An intergovernmental organization (IGO) or international organization is an organization composed primarily of sovereign states (referred to as ''m ...
and is shortlisted for the
Man Booker Prize The Booker Prize, formerly known as the Booker Prize for Fiction (1969–2001) and the Man Booker Prize (2002–2019), is a literary prize A literary award or literary prize is an award presented in recognition of a particularly lauded liter ...
* 2008 –
Amitav Ghosh Amitav Ghosh (born 11 July 1956)Ghosh, Amitav
, ''
launches his epic Ibis trilogy with ''Sea of Poppies'', shortlisted for the
Man Booker Prize The Booker Prize, formerly known as the Booker Prize for Fiction (1969–2001) and the Man Booker Prize (2002–2019), is a literary prize A literary award or literary prize is an award presented in recognition of a particularly lauded liter ...
* 2008 – ''Down River'' by John Hart wins
Edgar Award The Edgar Allan Poe Awards, popularly called the Edgars, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America Mystery Writers of America (MWA) is an organization of mystery and crime writers, based in New York City New York, often ...
for Best Novel * 2008 – ''The Secret Life of Words'' by
Henry Hitchings Henry Hitchings (born 11 December 1974) is an author, reviewer and critic, specializing in narrative non-fiction, with a particular emphasis on language and cultural history. The second of his books, ''The Secret Life of Words: How English Beca ...
wins the
John Llewellyn Rhys Prize The John Llewellyn Rhys Prize was a literary prize awarded annually for the best work of literature (fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama) by an author from the Commonwealth of Nations, Commonwealth aged 35 or under, written in English and publish ...
* 2009 – '''' by John Hart wins CWA
Ian Fleming Steel Dagger The CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger is an annual award given by the British Crime Writers' Association for best thriller of the year. The award is sponsored by the estate of Ian Fleming. It is given to a title that fits the broadest definition of the ...
/ITV Thriller of the Year Award, and the
Edgar Award The Edgar Allan Poe Awards, popularly called the Edgars, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America Mystery Writers of America (MWA) is an organization of mystery and crime writers, based in New York City New York, often ...
for Best Novel * 2009 – ''Martyr'' by Rory Clements, special mention in CWA Ellis Peters Historical Fiction Award * 2009 – '' Up in the Air'' by
Walter Kirn Walter Norris Kirn (born August 3, 1962) is an American novelist, literary criticism, literary critic, and essayist. He is the author of eight books, most notably ''Up in the Air (novel), Up in the Air'', which was made into a Up in the Air (2009 ...
turned into a
film A film, also called a movie, motion picture or moving picture, is a work of visual art The visual arts are art forms such as painting Painting is the practice of applying paint Paint is any pigmented liquid, liquefiable, ...
starring
George Clooney George Timothy Clooney (born May 6, 1961) is an American actor and filmmaker. He is the recipient of three Golden Globe Awards The Golden Globe Awards are accolades bestowed by the 87 members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association b ...
* 2010 – ''Revenger'' by Rory Clements wins CWA Ellis Peters Historical Fiction Award * 2010 – Film ''
Sarah's Key ''Sarah's Key'' (french: Elle s'appelait Sarah, links=no) is a 2010 French drama directed and co-written by Gilles Paquet-Brenner. The film is an adaptation of the 2006 Sarah's Key (novel), novel with the same title by Tatiana de Rosnay. The film ...
'', starring
Kristin Scott Thomas Dame Kristin Ann Scott Thomas (born 24 May 1960) is an English actress who also holds French citizenship. A five-time BAFTA Award The British Academy Film Awards or BAFTA Film Awards are presented in an annual award show hosted by the Bri ...
, released, based on
Tatiana de Rosnay Tatiana de Rosnay (born 28 September 1961) is a Franco-British writer. Life and career Tatiana de Rosnay was born on 28 September 1961 in the suburbs of Paris. She is of English, French and Russians, Russian descent. Her father is French sci ...

Tatiana de Rosnay
's
novel of the same name A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, typically written in prose and published as a book. The present English word for a long work of prose fiction derives from the for "new", "news", or "short story of something new", itself ...
* 2010 – ''Wait For Me!'' by Deborah Devonshire shortlisted for the British Book Awards Biography of the Year * 2011 – ''Mistaken'' by
Neil Jordan Neil Patrick Jordan (born 25 February 1950) is an Irish film director, screenwriter, novelist and short-story writer. His first book, ''Night in Tunisia'', won a Somerset Maugham Award and the Guardian Fiction Prize in 1979. He won an 65th Acad ...
wins Irish Book of the Year Award * 2012 – ''Icelight'' by Aly Monroe wins CWA Ellis Peters Historical Fiction Award * 2012 – Lloyd Jones's ''
Mister Pip ''Mister Pip'' (2006) is a novel by Lloyd Jones (New Zealand author), Lloyd Jones, a New Zealand author. It is named after the chief character in, and shaped by the plot of Charles Dickens' novel ''Great Expectations''. The novel is set against t ...
'' adapted into a film starring
Hugh Laurie James Hugh Calum Laurie (; born 11 June 1959) is an English actor, author, comedian, director, musician and singer. He is known for portraying the title character, Dr. Gregory House on the Fox Broadcasting Company, Fox medical drama televisio ...

Hugh Laurie
* 2012 – ''
Patrick Leigh Fermor Sir Patrick Michael Leigh Fermor (11 February 1915 – 10 June 2011) was an English writer, scholar, soldier and polyglot in Seattle labeled in four languages: English, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Spanish ( Tagalog also uses the Spanish w ...

Patrick Leigh Fermor
: An Adventure'' by
Artemis Cooper Artemis Cooper, the Hon. Lady Beevor Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, FRSL (born Hon. Alice Clare Antonia Opportune Cooper; 22 April 1953) is a United Kingdom, British writer, primarily of biography, biographies. She is the wife of hist ...
shortlisted for the Costa Biography Award, the Waterstone's Book of the Year Award and the National Book Awards Biography of the Year * 2020 – '' The Stonemason (book): A History of Building Britain'' by Andrew Ziminski.


Film adaptations of John Murray titles

* '' Up in the Air'' (2009) – based on the
novel A novel is a relatively long work of narrative A narrative, story or tale is any account of a series of related events or experiences, whether nonfiction Nonfiction (also spelled non-fiction) is any document A document is a written ...
by
Walter Kirn Walter Norris Kirn (born August 3, 1962) is an American novelist, literary criticism, literary critic, and essayist. He is the author of eight books, most notably ''Up in the Air (novel), Up in the Air'', which was made into a Up in the Air (2009 ...
, starring
George Clooney George Timothy Clooney (born May 6, 1961) is an American actor and filmmaker. He is the recipient of three Golden Globe Awards The Golden Globe Awards are accolades bestowed by the 87 members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association b ...
and
Anna Kendrick Anna Cooke Kendrick (born August 9, 1985) is an American actress and singer. She began her career as a child in theater productions. Her first starring role was in the 1998 Broadway Broadway may refer to: Theatre * Broadway Theatre (disamb ...
* ''
Sarah's Key ''Sarah's Key'' (french: Elle s'appelait Sarah, links=no) is a 2010 French drama directed and co-written by Gilles Paquet-Brenner. The film is an adaptation of the 2006 Sarah's Key (novel), novel with the same title by Tatiana de Rosnay. The film ...
'' (2010) – based on the
novel A novel is a relatively long work of narrative A narrative, story or tale is any account of a series of related events or experiences, whether nonfiction Nonfiction (also spelled non-fiction) is any document A document is a written ...
by
Tatiana de Rosnay Tatiana de Rosnay (born 28 September 1961) is a Franco-British writer. Life and career Tatiana de Rosnay was born on 28 September 1961 in the suburbs of Paris. She is of English, French and Russians, Russian descent. Her father is French sci ...

Tatiana de Rosnay
, starring
Kristin Scott Thomas Dame Kristin Ann Scott Thomas (born 24 May 1960) is an English actress who also holds French citizenship. A five-time BAFTA Award The British Academy Film Awards or BAFTA Film Awards are presented in an annual award show hosted by the Bri ...
* ''Mister Pip'' (2012) – based on the
novel A novel is a relatively long work of narrative A narrative, story or tale is any account of a series of related events or experiences, whether nonfiction Nonfiction (also spelled non-fiction) is any document A document is a written ...
by Lloyd Jones, starring
Hugh Laurie James Hugh Calum Laurie (; born 11 June 1959) is an English actor, author, comedian, director, musician and singer. He is known for portraying the title character, Dr. Gregory House on the Fox Broadcasting Company, Fox medical drama televisio ...

Hugh Laurie


References


Further reading

* * * * *


External links


Official website
*
National Library of Scotland - John Murray archive
(accessed 20 October 2016) * *
Works by John Murray
at
Hathi Trust HathiTrust Digital Library is a large-scale collaborative repository of digital content from research libraries A research library is a library which contains an in-depth collection of material on one or several subjects.(Young, 1983; p. 1 ...

Darwin Project
a project to publish all of the correspondence of
Charles Darwin Charles Robert Darwin (; ; 12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist Natural history is a domain of inquiry involving organism In biology, an organism () is any organic, life, living system that fu ...

Charles Darwin
, including his correspondence with Murray. {{DEFAULTSORT:John Murray (Publisher) Archives in Scotland Book publishing companies of the United Kingdom 1768 establishments in England Companies based in the City of Westminster Publishing companies established in the 1760s British companies established in 1768