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Iftar, also known as (from , , 'breakfast'), is the
evening meal
evening meal
with which
Muslim Muslims () are people who follow or practice Islam Islam (; ar, اَلْإِسْلَامُ, al-’Islām, "submission o God Oh God may refer to: * An exclamation; similar to "oh no", "oh yes", "oh my", "aw goodness", "ah gosh", " ...

Muslim
s end their daily
Ramadan * fa, رمضان, Ramazān * hi, रमज़ान, Ramzān * ku, ڕەمەزان, Remezan * ps, روژه, Rozha * so, Rabadaan or Rabmadaan * tr, Ramazan * ur, رمضان, Ramzān * diq, Remezan * sq, Ramazani , type = islam , longty ...

Ramadan
fast at sunset. They break their fast at the time of the call to prayer for the evening prayer. This is their second meal of the day; the daily fast during Ramadan begins immediately after the pre-dawn meal of and continues during the daylight hours, ending with sunset with the evening meal of iftar.


Description

Iftar is one of the religious observances of
Ramadan * fa, رمضان, Ramazān * hi, रमज़ान, Ramzān * ku, ڕەمەزان, Remezan * ps, روژه, Rozha * so, Rabadaan or Rabmadaan * tr, Ramazan * ur, رمضان, Ramzān * diq, Remezan * sq, Ramazani , type = islam , longty ...

Ramadan
, and is often done as a community, with
Muslim Muslims () are people who follow or practice Islam Islam (; ar, اَلْإِسْلَامُ, al-’Islām, "submission o God Oh God may refer to: * An exclamation; similar to "oh no", "oh yes", "oh my", "aw goodness", "ah gosh", " ...

Muslim
people gathering to break their fast together. The meal is taken just after the call to the prayer, which is around
sunset Sunset, also known as sundown, is the daily disappearance of the Sun below the horizon The horizon is the apparent line that separates earth Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor ...

sunset
. Traditionally three dates are eaten to break the fast, in emulation of the
Islamic prophet Prophets in Islam ( ar, الأنبياء في الإسلام, translit=al-ʾAnbiyāʾ fī al-ʾIslām) are individuals in Islam who are believed to spread God in Islam, God's message on Earth and to serve as models of ideal human behaviour. Som ...
,
Muhammad Muhammad ibn AbdullahHe is referred to by many appellations, including Messenger of Allah, The Prophet Muhammad, Allah's Apostle, Last Prophet of Islam, and others; there are also many variant spellings of Muhammad, such as Mohamet, Mohammed, ...

Muhammad
, who broke his fast in this manner, but this is not mandatory. Many Muslims believe that feeding someone iftar as a form of
charity Charity may refer to: Giving * Charitable organization or charity, a non-profit organization whose primary objectives are philanthropy and social well-being * Charity (practice), the practice of being benevolent, giving and sharing * Charity (virtu ...
is very rewarding and that such was practised by Muhammad. According to a publication of South Africa: Miss Pardoe writing in 1836 of her travels in
Stamboul The city of Istanbul has been known by a number of different names. The most notable names besides the modern Turkish name are Byzantium, Constantinople, and Stamboul. Different names are associated with different phases of its history, with differe ...
records a Turkish ''iftar'' she attended:
The room was a perfect square, totally unfurnished, save that in the centre of the floor was spread a carpet, on which stood a wooden frame, about two feet in height, supporting an immense round plated tray, with the edge slightly raised. In the centre of the tray was placed a capacious white basin, filled with a kind of cold
bread soup Bread soup is a simple soup that mainly consists of Staling, stale bread. Variations exist in many countries, and it is often eaten during Lent. Bread soups are created with brown bread as well as with white bread. The basis for bread soup is trad ...
; and around it were ranged a circle of small porcelain saucers, filled with sliced cheese, anchovies, caviare, and sweetmeats of every description: among these were scattered spoons of , and goblets of pink and white , whose rose-scented contents perfumed the apartment. The outer range of the tray was covered with fragments of unleavened bread, torn asunder; and portions of the Ramazan cake, a dry, close, sickly kind of paste, glazed with the whites of eggs, and strewed over with
aniseed Anise (, ; '), also called aniseed or rarely anix, is a flowering plant Flowering plants include multiple members of the clade Angiospermae (), commonly called angiosperms. The term "angiosperm" is derived from the Greek Greek may refer to ...

aniseed
s."
Pardoe reports the meal with served by slaves "black, white, and gray", as the guests took seats on cushions around the platter with cloth napkins, they were served fish with rice, eaten from a common pot. Of this practice, Pardoe says it is "rendered less revolting than it would otherwise be, by the fact that each individual is careful". Nineteen dishes were served for the ''iftar''—meats, birds and fish,
custard Custard is a variety of culinary preparations based on sweetened milk, cheese, or cream cooked with egg or egg yolk to thicken it, and sometimes also flour, corn starch, or gelatin. Depending on the recipe, custard may vary in consistency from a ...

custard
s and
pastries Pastry is a dough of flour, water and shortening (solid fats, including butter or lard) that may be savoury or sweetened. Sweetened pastries are often described as ''Flour confections, bakers' confectionery''. The word "pastries" suggests many k ...

pastries
, and for the last course, a pyramid-shaped heap of ''
pilaf Pilau ( UK spelling) or pilaf ( US spelling) is a rice Rice is the seed of the Poaceae, grass species ''Oryza sativa'' (Asian rice) or less commonly ''Oryza glaberrima'' (African rice). The name wild rice is usually used for species of the ...
''. According to Ottoman customs, sweets were served before salty foods, and stews were served before custards. After the meal they were attended by "a very pretty old ''massaljhe'', a type of storyteller who attended ladies' social functions to provide amusement and entertainment for the guests. The guests were offered cups of
Turkish coffee Turkish coffee is a style of coffee Coffee is a Coffee preparation, brewed drink prepared from roasted coffee beans, the seeds of epigynous berries, berries from certain flowering plants in the ''Coffea'' genus. From the coffee fruit, the se ...

Turkish coffee
and the ''massaljhe'' was smoking pipes of "scented weed". The father and sons of the family joined the guests for a coffee and smoke, and according to custom, brought gifts of nuts, sweetmeats and cakes for the women of the harem.


Around the world


Afghanistan

In
Afghanistan Afghanistan (; /: , Pashto: , Dari: ), officially the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, is a at the crossroads of and . Afghanistan is bordered by to the east and south; to the west; , , and to the north; and to the northeast. Occupyin ...

Afghanistan
, iftar usually includes the traditional dates, shorwa (soup),
kebab Kebab is a cooked meat dish (food), dish, with its origins in Middle Eastern cuisine, Middle Eastern cuisines. Many variants are popular around the world. In most Anglosphere, English-speaking countries, a ''kebab'' may be the classic shish keb ...

kebab
s, du piyaza (meat stewed in an onion-based sauce), manto (seasoned, minced meat wrapped in pasta),
kabuli palaw Kabuli palaw or Qabuli pulao ( Dari Persian: قابلی پلاو) is a variety of pilaf Pilaf ( US spelling), or pilau ( UK spelling) is a rice dish, or in some regions, a wheat dish, whose recipe usually involves cooking in stock or broth, add ...
(rice with lentils, raisins, carrots, and lamb), shorm beray, bolani (fried or baked flat bread with a vegetable filling), and
rice Rice is the seed of the Poaceae, grass species ''Oryza sativa'' (Asian rice) or less commonly ''Oryza glaberrima'' (African rice). The name wild rice is usually used for species of the genera ''Zizania (genus), Zizania'' and ''Porteresia'', bo ...

rice
, as well as other dishes. Afghans also have an extensive range of sweet dishes and desserts.


Bangladesh

In
Bangladesh Bangladesh (, bn, বাংলাদেশ, ), officially the People's Republic of Bangladesh, is a country in South Asia South Asia is the southern region of Asia, which is defined in both geography, geographical and culture, ethno-c ...

Bangladesh
, a wide variety of foods is prepared to break the fast at Maghrib time. Some of the common iftar items from
Bangladeshi cuisine Bangladeshi cuisine ( bn, বাংলাদেশের রান্না) is the national cuisine of Bangladesh Bangladesh (; bn, বাংলাদেশ, ), officially the People's Republic of Bangladesh, is a country in South Asia ...

Bangladeshi cuisine
include Piyaju (made of
lentil The lentil (''Lens culinaris'' or ''Lens esculenta'') is an edible legume A legume () is a plant in the family Fabaceae (or Leguminosae), or the fruit or seed of such a plant. When used as a dry grain, the seed is also called a pulse. Legumes ...
paste, chopped onions and green chillies, like
falafel Falafel (; ar, فلافل, ; is a Deep frying, deep-fried ball or patty-shaped fritter made from ground chickpeas, Vicia faba, broad beans, or both. Falafel is a traditional Middle Eastern cuisine, Middle Eastern food, commonly served in a p ...

falafel
), (made of thin slices of eggplant dipped in a thin batter of gram flour), ,
muri Muri may refer to: Places Colombia * Río Murri, a tributary of the Atrato River Estonia * Muri, Viljandi County, village in Karksi Parish, Viljandi County * Muri, Tartu County, village in Luunja Parish, Tartu County India * Muri, Ranchi, a town ...
, , ,
samosa A samosa () is a fried or baked pastry with a savory filling, including ingredients such as spiced potatoes, Onion, onions, peas, chicken and/or other meats. It may take different forms, including triangular, cone, or half-moon shapes, dependin ...

samosa
s, (a type of lentil-based savoury pastry),
chola The Chola dynasty ( ta, சோழ வம்சம்) was a Tamil Tamil may refer to: * Tamils, an ethnic group native to India, Sri Lanka and some other parts of Asia **Sri Lankan Tamils, Tamil people native to Sri Lanka **Tamil Malaysian ...

chola
(cooked
chickpea The chickpea or chick pea (''Cicer arietinum'') is an annual Annual may refer to: *Annual publication, periodical publications appearing regularly once per year **Yearbook **Literary annual *Annual plant *Annual report *Annual giving *Annual, Mo ...

chickpea
s),
kebab Kebab is a cooked meat dish (food), dish, with its origins in Middle Eastern cuisine, Middle Eastern cuisines. Many variants are popular around the world. In most Anglosphere, English-speaking countries, a ''kebab'' may be the classic shish keb ...

kebab
, mughlai porota (stuffed with minced meat, eggs and spices),variety of
pithaPithas are a variety of food similar to pancakes, dumplings or fritters, originating in Bengal Bengal (; Bengali language, Bengali: ', ) is a geopolitical, cultural and historical region in South Asia, specifically in the eastern part of the ...

pitha
, Aloo chop,
Singara Singara (, ''tà Síngara'') was a strongly fortified post at the northern extremity of Mesopotamia, which for a while, as it appears from coins minted there, was occupied by the Roman Empire, Romans as an advanced colony against the Persians. It w ...

Singara
, , , , Nimki, , Batasa, and different types of fruits such as
watermelon Watermelon (''Citrullus lanatus'') is a flowering plant Flowering plants include multiple members of the clade Angiospermae (), commonly called angiosperms. The term "angiosperm" is derived from the Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Any ...

watermelon
,
Apple An apple is an edible fruit produced by an apple tree (''Malus domestica''). Apple fruit tree, trees are agriculture, cultivated worldwide and are the most widely grown species in the genus ''Malus''. The tree originated in Central Asia, wher ...

Apple
,
Banana A banana is an elongated, edible fruit In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) formed from the ovary after flowering. Fruits are the means by which angiosperms dissemin ...

Banana
,
Papaya The papaya (, ) (from Carib via Spanish), papaw, () or pawpaw () is the plant ''Carica papaya'', one of the 22 accepted species in the genus ''Carica'' of the family Caricaceae. It was first domesticated in Mesoamerica, within modern-day sou ...

Papaya
,
Pear Pears are fruits produced and consumed around the world, growing on a tree and harvested in the Northern Hemisphere in late summer into October. The pear tree and shrub are a species In biology, a species is the basic unit of biological ...

Pear
,
Mango A mango is an edible stone fruit ), showing both fruit and seed Image:Nectarine Fruit Development.jpg, 300px, The development sequence of a typical drupe, a smooth-skinned (Peach#Nectarines, nectarine) type of peach (''Prunus persica'') over ...

Mango
,
Pineapple The pineapple (''Ananas comosus'') is a tropical plant with an edible fruit and is the most economically significant plant in the family Bromeliaceae. The pineapple is indigenous to South America, where it has been cultivated for many centurie ...

Pineapple
. Bengalis break their fast with all their friends and family and eat together in a banquet with their array of food however savoury items are eaten before sweet. Drinks such as lemon and yoghurt shorbot (made of yoghurt, water, sugar and
rooh afza Rooh Afza ( ur, ; hi, रूह अफ़ज़ा; bn, রূহ আফজা) (Soul Refresher) is a concentrated Squash (drink), squash. It was formulated in 1906 in Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh, Ghaziabad, British India by Naqi Ali Shah,
) as well as borhani,Gurer Shorbot (Jaggery Shorbot) are common on iftar tables across the country. People like to have iftar at home with all family members, and iftar parties are also arranged by mosques. People often distribute iftar in mosques for the people praying to eat, believing it is a good deed. After Iftar people pray
maghrib The Maghrib prayer ( ar, صلاة المغرب ', "sunset prayer") is one of the five mandatory salah Salah (Arabic: , romanized: , 'prayer'), also known as ''namāz'' ( fa, نماز) and also spelled ''salat'', are prayers performed by ...

maghrib
and later Isha then many head straight for
Taraweeh ''Tarawih'' ( ar, تراويح, Tarāwīḥ, literally "rest and relaxation") Taraweeh is derived from the Arabic word meaning “to rest and relax”, as it is seen as a special form of Islamic meditation. These special prayers involve readin ...
prayers where 20 rakats are performed to finish one
Juz' A ''juzʼ'' (Arabic Arabic (, ' or , ' or ) is a Semitic language that first emerged in the 1st to 4th centuries CE.Semitic languages: an international handbook / edited by Stefan Weninger; in collaboration with Geoffrey Khan, Michael P. St ...
of the Quran.


Brunei

In
Brunei Darussalam Brunei ( ; ), officially the Nation of Brunei, the Abode of Peace ( ms, Negara Brunei Darussalam, Jawi alphabet, Jawi: ), is a sovereign state, country located on the north coast of the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia. Apart from its coas ...
, iftar is locally referred to as ''sungkai''. Traditionally this is held at a regional or village
mosque A mosque (; from ar, مَسْجِد, masjid, ; literally "place of ritual prostration"), also called masjid, is a place of worship for Muslims. Any act of worship that follows the Salah, Islamic rules of prayer can be said to create a mosque, w ...

mosque
for those who have or will be performing the evening prayers. At the mosque, a mosque
buffet A buffet can be either a sideboard (a flat-topped piece of furniture with cupboards and drawers, used for storing crockery, glasses, and table linen) or a system of serving meals in which food is placed in a public area where the diners serve ...

buffet
is prepared by the local residents at which all are welcomed to break their fast together. Before the iftar, the '' beduk'' (a type of drum) must be heard as a signal to begin the sungkai. In the capital
Bandar Seri Begawan Bandar Seri Begawan (JawiJawi may refer to: People and languages *Australia: **Jawi dialect, a nearly extinct Australian aboriginal language **Jawi people, an Australian Aboriginal people of the Kimberley coast of Western Australia, who speak ...
, the firing of several cannons at the central business district also marks the sungkai. The sungkai is generally a welcomed time of the day, so Bruneians occasionally break their fast at restaurants along with their extended family. Additionally, only during the month of Ramadan, each district, with the exception of the Brunei and Muara district, hosts an expansive network of ''tamu'' or Ramadan stalls where freshly cooked local delicacies are sold more than other times of the year.


India

In
India India, officially the Republic of India (Hindi Hindi (Devanagari: , हिंदी, ISO 15919, ISO: ), or more precisely Modern Standard Hindi (Devanagari: , ISO 15919, ISO: ), is an Indo-Aryan language spoken chiefly in Hindi Belt, ...

India
, Muslims break their fasts with family and friends, and many Mosques arrange free 'iftar.' Preparations for iftar commence hours before, in homes and at roadside stalls. Iftar begins by eating dates or drinking water, but this is only the opening of a rich meal. The spread of 'iftar' can be grand, with both vegetarian to non-vegetarian dishes and a variety of juices and sherbets. Iftar usually is a heavy meal and is followed by a second, lighter dinner eaten before the night ( isha) prayers and the
taraweeh ''Tarawih'' ( ar, تراويح, Tarāwīḥ, literally "rest and relaxation") Taraweeh is derived from the Arabic word meaning “to rest and relax”, as it is seen as a special form of Islamic meditation. These special prayers involve readin ...
prayers. In
Hyderabad Hyderabad ( , , ) is the capital and largest city of the India India, officially the Republic of India (Hindi: ), is a country in South Asia. It is the List of countries and dependencies by area, seventh-largest country by area, the ...
and nearby areas, people often break their fast with
Haleem Haleem is a type of stew that is widely consumed in the Indian subcontinent, the Middle East The Middle East ( ar, الشرق الأوسط, ISO 233 The international standard An international standard is a technical standard A technica ...

Haleem
because it has a rich taste and is quite filling. In other southern states (
Tamil Nadu Tamil Nadu (; ) is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of State * The State (newspaper), ''The State'' (newspaper), a daily newspape ...

Tamil Nadu
and
Kerala Kerala ( ; ) is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of State * The State (newspaper), ''The State'' (newspaper), a daily newspaper ...

Kerala
), Muslims break their fast with ''nonbu kanji'', a rich, filling rice dish of porridge consistency, cooked for hours with meat and vegetables. This is often served with
bonda Bonda is a deep-fried South India South India is a region consisting of the southern part of India India (Hindi: ), officially the Republic of India (Hindi: ), is a country in South Asia. It is the List of countries and dependenci ...

bonda
,
bajji A bhaji, bhajji, bhajiya or bajji is a spicy hot snack or entree dish similar to a fritter, originating from the Indian subcontinent, with several variants. It is a popular snack food in Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Goa, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Andhra Prad ...

bajji
, and
vadai Vada () or bada () is a category of savoury fried snack A snack is a small portion of food Food is any substance consumed to provide nutritional Nutrition is the biochemical Biochemistry or biological chemistry, is the study ...
. Vegetarians break their fast with a dish called surkumba, which is prepared from milk, and this is particularly popular in certain parts of
Karnataka Karnataka (; ISO The International Organization for Standardization (ISO; ) is an international standard are technical standards developed by international organizations (intergovernmental organizations), such as Codex Alimentarius in f ...

Karnataka
. In northern states like
Delhi Delhi (; ''Dillī''; ''Dillī''; ''Dêhlī''), officially the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi, is a city and a of containing , the capital of India. * * * Straddling the river, but primarily its western or right bank, Delhi ...

Delhi
,
Uttar Pradesh Uttar Pradesh (; , 'Northern Province') is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of State * The State (newspaper), ''The State'' (new ...

Uttar Pradesh
,
Madhya Pradesh Madhya Pradesh (, ; meaning ''Central Province'') is a state in central India. Its capital city, capital is Bhopal, and the largest city is Indore, with Jabalpur, Ujjain, Gwalior, Satna being the other major cities. Madhya Pradesh is the List o ...

Madhya Pradesh
and
West Bengal West Bengal (, Bengali Bengali or Bengalee, or Bengalese may refer to: *something of, from, or related to Bengal, a large region in South Asia * Bengalis, an ethnic and linguistic group of the region * Bengali language, the language they sp ...

West Bengal
, the fast is typically ended with fresh dates, cut fresh fruits (sometimes served as
chaat Chaat or chāt () is a family of savoury snack A snack is a small portion of food Food is any substance consumed to provide Nutrient, nutritional support for an organism. Food is usually of plant, animal or Fungus, fungal origin, ...
) and fruit juice along with fried dishes like
samosas A samosa () is a fried or baked pastry Pastry is a dough of flour, water and shortening (solid fats, including butter) that may be Savoriness, savoury or sweetened. Sweetened pastries are often described as ''Flour confections, bakers' conf ...

samosas
, pakodas etc.


Indonesia

In
Indonesia Indonesia ( ), officially the Republic of Indonesia ( id, Republik Indonesia, links=yes ), is a country in Southeast Asia Southeast Asia, also spelled South East Asia and South-East Asia, and also known as Southeastern Asia or SEA, is t ...

Indonesia
iftar is called "buka puasa", which means "to open the fast". Markets sell various foods for iftar, including the date, which is popular, as well as unique Indonesian sweet food and drink such as
kolak Kolak (or kolek) is an Indonesian dessert Dessert () is a course Course may refer to: Directions or navigation * Course (navigation), the path of travel * Course (orienteering), a series of control points visited by orienteers during a co ...

kolak
, , ,
es campur Es campur (Indonesian for "mixed ice") is an Indonesian Indonesian is anything of, from, or related to Indonesia, an archipelagic country in Southeast Asia. It may refer to: * Indonesians, citizens of Indonesia ** Native Indonesians, diverse gr ...

es campur
,
cendol Cendol is an iced sweet dessert that contains droplets of green rice flour jelly, coconut milk and palm sugar syrup. It is commonly found in Southeast Asia and is popular in Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei, Cambodia, East Timor, Laos, Vietnam, Tha ...

cendol
or dawet, etc. Most of them are only found easily in Ramadan. Iftar is usually begun by eating these sweets, as inspired by the Prophet's
Sunnah In Islam Islam (;There are ten pronunciations of ''Islam'' in English, differing in whether the first or second syllable has the stress, whether the ''s'' is or , and whether the ''a'' is pronounced , or (when the stress is on the first ...
of eating dates. Maghrib time is traditionally marked by the Bedug, a traditional big Indonesian drum. After , traditional markets will begin to open. The food stalls generally sell many kinds of items that are specifically for "iftar". Traffic jams often occur leading up to Maghrib time. Sometimes people invite groups of orphans to eat with them. After Iftar and maghrib prayer which is usually done at the homes, people go to the mosque for Isha'a and
Tarawih ''Tarawih'' ( ar, تراويح, Tarāwīḥ, literally "rest and relaxation") Taraweeh is derived from the Arabic word meaning “to rest and relax”, as it is seen as a special form of Islamic meditation. These special prayers involve readin ...
prayer, which in Indonesia, is often accompanied by a short sermon known as "ceramah" before the Tarawih prayer commence.


Iran

In Iran, neighbourhood iftar feasts are not customary; the (larger and more festive) meal is usually shared among family. A small selection of foods is prepared to break the fast and is summarily followed by a proper Persian meal. Most common iftar items are: Chai (tea) with zulbia and bamiyeh and other sweets, date palm, dates, halva, Fereni, Ash Reshteh, Haleem, Halim, Shami Lapeh, ''naan, Noon'' (bread usually lavash or Barbari bread, barbari) and ''paneer'' with Leaf vegetable, greens and fresh herbs. One of the biggest iftar meals in the world takes place in Imam Reza shrine in Mashhad, Mashhad city every year, with some 12 thousand people attending every night.


Malaysia

In Malaysia, iftar is known as "berbuka puasa", which literally means "to open the fast". As usual, the Muslims break the fast with either dried or fresh dates. Various foodstuffs from the Malaysian cuisine tend to be readily available from ''Bazaar Ramadhan''s, which are street food markets that are open during Ramadan; local favourites include bandung (drink), bandung drink, sugarcane juice, soybean milk mixed with grass jelly, ''nasi lemak'', ''laksa'', ''ayam percik'', Hainanese chicken rice, chicken rice, satay and popiah among others. Many high-end restaurants and hotels also provide special iftar and dinner packages for those who want to break the fast outside with families and friends. Furthermore, most mosques also provide free ''bubur lambok'' (a special type of rice congee) after Asar prayers. Most Muslims will usually have a special supper after performing their ''tarawih'' prayers called ''moreh'' (pronounced ). The light meal, taking place in mosque and prayer hall grounds, consists of local traditional snacks and hot tea. In shopping malls and public venues in Malaysia, the time of iftar is indicated by radios announcing the call to Maghrib prayers.


Maldives

In the Maldives, iftar is known as ''roadha villun'', which means "break fast". As usual, most Muslims break the fast with either dried or fresh dates. There are many exclusive restaurants and hotels providing special iftar and dinner packages for those who want to break the fast outside with the families and friends. All the mosques in the Maldives provide free dates and juice to break fast. At local homes you will find various cold fruit juices (water melon, mango, passion fruit, pineapple) sweet (boakiba, pudding) and salty shorteats called hedhika (boakiba, bajiya, gulha, masroshi, cutlets), the latter made with mainly fish, curries, roshi and salads made with local greens, chilli, onion and lemon.


Nigeria

Nigeria hosts what is by some way the largest Muslim community in West Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. Iftar (known in the Hausa Language as [Buda-baki] and [Yoruba language] as ''isinu'') holds the same importance in Nigeria's Sunni population as the rest of the Islamic world. Foods include Jollof rice, suya, egusi, ọbẹ̀ ẹgúsí, goat meat, ewurẹ, Acarajé, àkàrà, date palm, dabinu/dabino, common fig, ọ̀pọ̀tọ́, etc.


Pakistan

In Pakistan, almost everybody stops to rejoice for a few minutes following the iftar sirens and adhan (call to prayer). Preparations for iftar commence about three hours beforehand, in homes and at roadside stalls. The fast can be ended by eating dates, or simply by drinking water, if dates are not available. Many restaurants offer iftar deals, especially in the big cities like Karachi, Lahore, and Islamabad. Iftar as a Pakistani cuisine, meal in Pakistan is usually heavy, consisting mainly of sweet and savoury treats such as jalebi (pretzel-shaped, deep-fried batter, soaked in sugar syrup),
samosas A samosa () is a fried or baked pastry Pastry is a dough of flour, water and shortening (solid fats, including butter) that may be Savoriness, savoury or sweetened. Sweetened pastries are often described as ''Flour confections, bakers' conf ...

samosas
(minced meat and/or vegetables, wrapped in dough and deep-fried or baked), pakora (sliced vegetables, dipped in batter and deep-fried) with ketchup or chatni, and namak para (seasoned cracker), besides the staple dates and water. Other items such as chicken rolls, spring rolls, Shami Kebabs, fruit salads, papad (sheets of batter that are then sun-dried, deep-fried or roasted until they have the texture of potato chips or crisps), chana chaat (chickpea salad), and dahi balay (or "dahi baray"—fried lentil dumplings served with yoghurt) are also very common. Amongst the Punjabi people, Punjabi, Sindhi people, Sindhi and Muhajir (Urdu-speaking people), Mohajir households, iftar is often followed up by a regular dinner later during the night. Those in the north and west, including Pashtun people, Pashtuns, Baloch people, Balochis, and Tajik people, Tajiks, on the other hand combine dinner and iftar. La mian, Laghman soup (noodle soup), locally called Kalli, is an iftar staple in Chitral and parts of Gilgit. After iftar, Muslims rush to the mosques to offer
Tarawih ''Tarawih'' ( ar, تراويح, Tarāwīḥ, literally "rest and relaxation") Taraweeh is derived from the Arabic word meaning “to rest and relax”, as it is seen as a special form of Islamic meditation. These special prayers involve readin ...
(an 8 or 20 rakat Muslim prayer during the month of Ramadan). Various television channels also stop their normal telecast and broadcast special Ramadan transmissions, especially at the time of Sehar and Iftar. The whole month of Ramadan is marked in Pakistan as a festive season when people make donations to the poor and give charity. Some organizations and companies also offer free iftar meals to the common people.


Russia

In Russia, Ramadan is observed mostly in Muslim-majority states: (Dagestan, Chechnya, Ingushetia, Adygea, Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachay-Cherkessia, Tatarstan and Bashkortostan). In cities outside of Muslim majority republics with a significant Muslim presence, it has become a tradition to open Ramadan Tent, a public iftar event organised by Russia's Mufti Council and Religious Administration of Muslims. In Dagestan, Muslims gather in Makhachkala Central Juma Mosque to break their fast and pray
taraweeh ''Tarawih'' ( ar, تراويح, Tarāwīḥ, literally "rest and relaxation") Taraweeh is derived from the Arabic word meaning “to rest and relax”, as it is seen as a special form of Islamic meditation. These special prayers involve readin ...
prayers. Dates and fruits are preferred to break the fast, followed by soup, bread, and different local delicacies such as beşbarmaq, Kürze mantı, kurze and others.


Singapore

In Singapore, iftar is called "buka puasa". It is usually accompanied with dates and sweet drinks such as Bandung, Chendol and Air Sirap. Singaporean Muslims usually eat an array of dishes ranging from rice and noodles. Many buy food from bazaars that can be found in different parts of the city state such as in Bugis, Kampong Glam, Geylang Serai and even in populated towns such as Tampines, Jurong East, Jurong West, Clementi and West Coast.


Sri Lanka

Muslims in Sri Lanka make Cuisine of Sri Lanka, special snacks /appetisers at Muslim homes, such as
samosas A samosa () is a fried or baked pastry Pastry is a dough of flour, water and shortening (solid fats, including butter) that may be Savoriness, savoury or sweetened. Sweetened pastries are often described as ''Flour confections, bakers' conf ...

samosas
, cutlets, rolls, kanjee, falooda and many more dishes. They eat iftar with the family if possible. Muslims believe that giving to the poor is very rewarding. They eat a date and drink some water to break the fast or to perform iftar. Then they have the prepared meal. Some people like to prepare foods and give to the people performing iftar in the mosques.


Taiwan

Islam is a minority religion in Taiwan. During Ramadan, major mosques around Taiwan are filled with Muslims going to have their iftar followed by Tarawih prayer. Muslims in Taiwan usually break their fast with dates and water.


Trinidad and Tobago

In Trinidad and Tobago Muslims represent about 6% of the population. Iftar is traditionally performed in the social setting of the Masjid. Various food items showing the mixed ethnic nature of the country are usually available. Fare may include fried rice; roti; curried chicken, goat, and duck; curried channa; and alloo (potato). Depending on the persons presenting the meal, it may even include such non-traditional items as macaroni pie. The meal is usually served with persons sitting at tables with the components of the meal brought to the tables.


Turkey

In Turkey and Northern Cyprus, the month of Ramadan is celebrated with great joy, and iftar dinners play a big part in this. In larger cities like Istanbul all of the restaurants offer special deals and set menus for iftar. Most of the set menus start with a soup or an appetiser platter called ''iftariye''. It consists of dates, olives, cheese, pastırma, sujuk, Ramazan pidesi (a special bread only baked during Ramadan), and various pastries called ''börek''. The main course consists of various Turkish cuisine, Turkish foods, especially the Ottoman cuisine, Ottoman Palace Traditional Foods. A dessert called ''güllaç'' is served in most places. Most of the fine-dining restaurants offer live musical performances of Ottoman classical music, Music of Turkey, Turkish music and Sufi music. Most of the Ramadan celebration practices in Turkey have their roots in the traditions of the former Ottoman Empire. At the minarets of mosques, lights called ''kandil'' are switched on from sunset to dawn. As soon as the sun sets, a traditional "Ramadan Cannon" is fired from the highest hill in every city as a signal to start eating the iftar. In Istanbul, one of the more notable places to celebrate the iftar dinner is the Sultanahmet Square. Located near the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Blue Mosque) the Hippodrome of Constantinople, Sultanahmet Square hosts many activities, including mini restaurants opened during the month of Ramadan, special shows, and traditional Ottoman theatrical shows. At Topkapi Palace the Ottoman sultan-caliphs would break their fast under the gilded Gazebo, bower. The
Tarawih ''Tarawih'' ( ar, تراويح, Tarāwīḥ, literally "rest and relaxation") Taraweeh is derived from the Arabic word meaning “to rest and relax”, as it is seen as a special form of Islamic meditation. These special prayers involve readin ...
prayer is mostly practised in Turkish mosques as 20 rekahs, broken into 5 groups of 4 rekahs. Between each set of 4 rekahs, a hymn composed by the Turkish musician Buhurizade Itri is sung by all people attending the prayer. The hymn is a prayer to praise the Prophets of Islam, Islamic prophet
Muhammad Muhammad ibn AbdullahHe is referred to by many appellations, including Messenger of Allah, The Prophet Muhammad, Allah's Apostle, Last Prophet of Islam, and others; there are also many variant spellings of Muhammad, such as Mohamet, Mohammed, ...

Muhammad
. As Ramadan is also the month of Zakat, almsgiving, many people organise iftar dinners for the poor, students, guests, and foreigners. People can find Turkish food available in most mosques. During Ramadan, Turkish Non-governmental organization, NGOs like the Journalists and Writers Foundation have recently started to organise Interfaith Dialogue Dinners to promote dialogue between those of different religious and cultural backgrounds. These high-profile events have started a whole new era of organising large dinner parties by the NGOs in Turkey for people from different cultures and understandings even if they are not Muslims. In recent years Turkish NGOs, such as the Peace Islands Institute (former Interfaith Dialog Center), all over the world have organised iftar dinners for Cross-cultural communication, inter-cultural and interfaith dialogue, which helps promote the true understanding of the month of Ramadan.


United States and Canada

Iftar meals in the United States and Canada are often held at mosques, households, and Islamic community centres. On 9 December 1805, President of the United States, President Thomas Jefferson postponed dinner at the White House until sunset to accommodate an envoy from Tunis, an event considered by many to be the first White House iftar. The first official iftar was held at the White House in 1996, hosted by First Lady Hillary Clinton, and iftar meals were subsequently held annually at the White House and hosted by the President of the United States, U.S. President and the First Lady of the United States, First Lady until 2016. President Donald Trump did not host an iftar dinner at the White House in 2017, his first year in office, but resumed the tradition on June 6, 2018, hosting friends and diplomatic staff from many Muslim-majority nations. From 1996, the United States Department of State held an annual iftar dinner for local and national community leaders and faith groups as well as foreign policy officials. This practice ceased in 2017, when Secretary of State Rex Tillerson declined to host an iftar. The Pentagon continues its tradition of holding an iftar for Muslim members of the U.S. armed forces and special guests from other nations; the first such iftar under the Trump administration was held on 15 June 2017. The occasion has also been marked in Judaism in the United States, Jewish synagogues. In 2012, Iftar was recognized with events at three synagogues in Chicago, Illinois. Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper extended an invitation to Muslim leaders to break the Ramadan fast with him at the Prime Minister's residence in 2015. This was the first time the Prime Minister's office had hosted an iftar.


See also

*Breakfast *Eid ul-Fitr *Suhoor


References


External links


Ramadan Articles - Haq IslamDubai Iftar Options for Ramadan 2019

iftar Sahur Vakitleri ve Ramazan imsakiyesiRamadan Calendar KSA 2020
{{Meals_navbox Meals Islamic terminology Iftar foods, Eating parties