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Corinth ( ; el, Κόρινθος, Kórinthos, ) is the successor to an ancient city, and is a former
municipality A municipality is usually a single administrative division Administrative division, administrative unitArticle 3(1). , country subdivision, administrative region, subnational entity, first-level subdivision, as well as many similar terms, ...
in
Corinthia Corinthia ( el, Κορινθία ''Korinthía'') is one of the regional units of Greece The 74 regional units ( el, περιφερειακές ενότητες, ; sing. , ) are administrative units Administrative division, administrative unit ...
,
Peloponnese The Peloponnese (), Peloponnesia, or Peloponnesus (; el, Πελοπόννησος, Pelopónnēsos, ) is a peninsula and geographic regions of Greece, geographic region in southern Greece. It is connected to the central part of the country by the ...
, which is located in south-central
Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, Elláda, ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeast Europe, Southeastern Europe. Its population is approximately 10.7 million as of 2021; Athens is its largest and capital city, followed ...

Greece
. Since the 2011 local government reform, it has been part of the municipality of Corinth, of which it is the seat and a municipal unit. It is the capital of Corinthia. It was founded as Nea Korinthos (), or New Corinth, in 1858 after an earthquake destroyed the existing settlement of Corinth, which had developed in and around the site of
ancient Corinth Corinth ( ; grc, Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; grc, label=Doric Greek, Ϙόρινθος; tr, label=Turkish language, Turkish, Gördes la, label=Classical Latin, Latin, Corinthus) was a city-state (''polis'') on the Isthmus of Corinth, the n ...

ancient Corinth
.


Geography

Located about west of
Athens , image_skyline = File:Athens Montage L.png, center, 275px, alt=Athens montage. Clicking on an image in the picture causes the browser to load the appropriate article. rect 15 15 985 460 Acropolis of Athens rect 15 475 48 ...

Athens
, Corinth is surrounded by the coastal townlets of (clockwise)
Lechaio Lechaio ( el, Λέχαιο) is a village in the municipal unit of Assos-Lechaio in Corinthia Corinthia ( el, Κορινθία ''Korinthía'') is one of the regional units of Greece The 74 regional units ( el, περιφερειακές ενότη ...

Lechaio
, Isthmia,
Kechries Kechries ( el, Κεχριές, rarely Κεχρεές) is a village in the municipality of Corinth Corinth ( ; el, Κόρινθος, Kórinthos, ) is the successor to an ancient city, and is a former municipality in Corinthia, Peloponnese (r ...
, and the inland townlets of
Examilia Examilia ( el, Εξαμίλια) is a town in the municipality of Corinth, Greece. It is situated about 5 km south of Corinth, and 6 km west of Kechries (ancient Cenchreae). History The first settlers of Examilia came from #Novi Sad, Novi Sa ...
and the archaeological site and village of ancient Corinth. Natural features around the city include the narrow coastal plain of Vocha, the
Corinthian Gulf Corinth Canal The Gulf of Corinth or the Corinthian Gulf ( el, Κορινθιακός Kόλπος, ''Korinthiakόs Kόlpos'', ) is a deep inlet An inlet is an indentation of a shoreline, usually long and narrow, such as a small bay or arm, ...

Corinthian Gulf
, the
Isthmus of Corinth An isthmus ( or ; plural: isthmuses or isthmi; from grc, ἰσθμός, isthmós, neck) is a narrow piece of land connecting two larger areas across an expanse of water by which they are otherwise separated. A tombolo A tombolo is a sandy is ...

Isthmus of Corinth
cut by its
canal Canals are waterways channels Channel, channels, channeling, etc., may refer to: Geography * Channel (geography), in physical geography, a landform consisting of the outline (banks) of the path of a narrow body of water. Australia * ...

canal
, the
Saronic Gulf The Saronic Gulf (Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeast Europe. Its population is approxim ...

Saronic Gulf
, the
Oneia Mountains The Oneia Mountains ( el, Όνεια Όρη or ''Oneia Ori'') are a low mountain range in Corinthia, northeastern Peloponnese, Greece. The range extends 9 km from west to east, starting west of the village of Solomos, Corinthia, Solomos, passin ...
, and the monolithic rock of
Acrocorinth Acrocorinth ( el, Ακροκόρινθος), "Upper Corinth", the acropolis of ancient Corinth, is a monolithic rock overseeing the ancient city of Corinth, Ancient Greece, Greece. In the estimation of George Forrest, "It is the most impressive o ...

Acrocorinth
, where the medieval
acropolis An acropolis (Ancient Greek: ἀκρόπολις, ''akropolis''; from ''akros'' (άκρος) or ''akron'' (άκρον), "highest, topmost, outermost" and ''polis'' (πόλις), "city"; plural in English: ''acropoles'', ''acropoleis'' or ''acropol ...

acropolis
was built.


History

Corinth derives its name from
Ancient Corinth Corinth ( ; grc, Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; grc, label=Doric Greek, Ϙόρινθος; tr, label=Turkish language, Turkish, Gördes la, label=Classical Latin, Latin, Corinthus) was a city-state (''polis'') on the Isthmus of Corinth, the n ...

Ancient Corinth
, a
city-state A city-state is an independent sovereign Sovereign is a title which can be applied to the highest leader in various categories. The word is borrowed from Old French Old French (, , ; Modern French French ( or ) is a Romance la ...
of antiquity. The site was occupied from before 3000 BC. Historical references begin with the early 8th century BC, when Corinth began to develop as a commercial center. Between the 8th and 7th centuries, the Bacchiad family ruled Corinth.
Cypselus Cypselus ( grc-gre, Κύψελος, ''Kypselos'') was the first tyrant A tyrant (from Ancient Greek Ancient Greek includes the forms of the Greek language used in ancient Greece and the classical antiquity, ancient world from aroun ...
overthrew the
Bacchiad The Bacchiadae (Ancient Greek: Βακχιάδαι ''Bakkhiadai''), a tightly-knit Doric clan, were the ruling family of archaic Corinth in the eighth and seventh centuries BCE, a period of Corinthian cultural power. Corinth had been a backwater i ...
family, and between 657 and 550 BC, he and his son
Periander Periander (; el, Περίανδρος; died c. 585 BC), was the Second Tyrant of the Cypselid dynasty that ruled over Corinth Corinth ( ; el, Κόρινθος, Kórinthos, ) is the successor to an ancient city, and is a former municipality i ...

Periander
ruled Corinth as the Tyrants. In about 550 BC, an oligarchical government seized power. This government allied with
Sparta Sparta (Doric Greek Doric or Dorian ( grc, Δωρισμός, Dōrismós) was an . Its variants were spoken in the southern and eastern as well as in , , , , , some islands in the southern and some cities on the south east coast of ...

Sparta
within the
Peloponnesian League The Peloponnesian League was an alliance in the Peloponnesus The Peloponnese (), Peloponnesia, or Peloponnesus (; el, Πελοπόννησος, Pelopónnēsos, ) is a peninsula A peninsula ( la, paeninsula from ' "almost" and ' "island") ...
, and Corinth participated in the
Persian Wars The Greco-Persian Wars (also often called the Persian Wars) were a series of conflicts between the Achaemenid Empire The Achaemenid Empire (; peo, 𐎧𐏁𐏂, translit=Xšāça, translation=The Empire), also called the First Persian Empi ...
and
Peloponnesian War The Peloponnesian War (431–404 BC) was an ancient Greek Ancient Greek includes the forms of the Greek language Greek ( el, label=Modern Greek Modern Greek (, , or , ''Kiní Neoellinikí Glóssa''), generally referred to ...

Peloponnesian War
as an ally of Sparta. After Sparta's victory in the Peloponnesian war, the two allies fell out with one another, and Corinth pursued an independent policy in the various wars of the early 4th century BC. After the Macedonian conquest of Greece, the
Acrocorinth Acrocorinth ( el, Ακροκόρινθος), "Upper Corinth", the acropolis of ancient Corinth, is a monolithic rock overseeing the ancient city of Corinth, Ancient Greece, Greece. In the estimation of George Forrest, "It is the most impressive o ...

Acrocorinth
was the seat of a Macedonian garrison until 243 BC, when the city was liberated and joined the
Achaean League The Achaean League (Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeast Europe. Its population is approximately 10.7 m ...
. Nearly a century later, in 146 BC, Corinth was captured and was completely destroyed by the Roman army. As a newly rebuilt Roman colony in 44 BC, Corinth flourished and became the administrative capital of the Roman province of
Achaea Achaea () or Achaia (), sometimes transliterated from Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southe ...
. In 1858, the old city, now known as Ancient Corinth (Αρχαία Κόρινθος, ''Archaia Korinthos''), located southwest of the modern city, was totally destroyed by a magnitude 6.5 earthquake. New Corinth (''Nea Korinthos'') was then built to the north-east of it, on the coast of the Gulf of Corinth. In 1928, a magnitude 6.3 earthquake devastated the new city, which was then rebuilt on the same site. In 1933, there was a great fire, and the new city was rebuilt again.


Demographics

The Municipality of Corinth (Δήμος Κορινθίων) had a population of 58,192 according to the 2011 census, the second most populous municipality in the
Peloponnese Region The Peloponnese Region ( el, Περιφέρεια Πελοποννήσου, translit=Periféria Peloponnísou, ) is a Modern regions of Greece, region in southern Greece. It borders Western Greece to the north and Attica (region), Attica to the no ...
after
Kalamata Kalamáta ( el, Καλαμάτα ) is the second most populous city of the Peloponnese peninsula, after Patras, in southern Greece and the largest city of the Peloponnese (region), homonymous administrative region. As the capital and chief port o ...

Kalamata
. The municipal unit of Corinth had 38,132 inhabitants, of which Corinth itself had 30,176 inhabitants, placing it in third place behind Kalamata and
Tripoli Tripoli (; ar, طرابلس, ; ber, ⵜⵔⵢⴱⵓⵍⵙ) is the capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger uppercase or capitals ...
among the cities of the Peloponnese Region. The municipal unit of Corinth (Δημοτική ενότητα Κορινθίων) includes apart from Corinth proper the town of Archaia Korinthos (2,198 inhabitants in 2011), the town of
Examilia Examilia ( el, Εξαμίλια) is a town in the municipality of Corinth, Greece. It is situated about 5 km south of Corinth, and 6 km west of Kechries (ancient Cenchreae). History The first settlers of Examilia came from #Novi Sad, Novi Sa ...
(2,905 inhabitants), and the smaller settlements of Xylokeriza (1,316 inhabitants) and Solomos (817 inhabitants). The municipal unit has an area of 102.187 km2.


Economy


Industry

Corinth is a major industrial hub at a national level. The Corinth Refinery is one of the largest
oil refining An oil refinery or petroleum refinery is an industrial process Industrial processes are procedures involving chemical A chemical substance is a form of matter having constant chemical composition and characteristic properties. Some referenc ...
industrial complexes in
Europe Europe is a continent A continent is any of several large landmass A landmass, or land mass, is a large region In geography Geography (from Greek: , ''geographia'', literally "earth description") is a field of scienc ...

Europe
. Ceramic tiles, copper cables, gums, gypsum, leather, marble, meat products, medical equipment, mineral water and beverages, petroleum products, and salt are produced nearby. , a period of
deindustrialization The former decline_of_the_city's_once_vibrant_Automotive_industry_in_the_United_States.html" ;"title="Decline_of_Detroit.html" ;"title="Detroit.html" ;"title="Packard Automotive Plant in Detroit">Packard Automotive Plant in Detroit is one of the ...
commenced as a large pipework complex, a textile factory and a meat packing facility diminished their operations.


Transport


Roads

Corinth is a major road hub. The A7
toll Toll may refer to: Transportation * Toll (fee) A toll is a fee A fee is the price A price is the (usually not negative) quantity of payment or compensation given by one party to another in return for one unit of goods or services ...

toll
motorway for
Tripoli Tripoli (; ar, طرابلس, ; ber, ⵜⵔⵢⴱⵓⵍⵙ) is the capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger uppercase or capitals ...
and
Kalamata Kalamáta ( el, Καλαμάτα ) is the second most populous city of the Peloponnese peninsula, after Patras, in southern Greece and the largest city of the Peloponnese (region), homonymous administrative region. As the capital and chief port o ...

Kalamata
, (and Sparta via A71
toll Toll may refer to: Transportation * Toll (fee) A toll is a fee A fee is the price A price is the (usually not negative) quantity of payment or compensation given by one party to another in return for one unit of goods or services ...

toll
), branches off the A8/
European route E94 European route E 94 is part of the International E-road network The international E-road network is a numbering system for road A road is a thoroughfare, route, or way on land between two Location (geography), places that has been P ...
toll Toll may refer to: Transportation * Toll (fee) A toll is a fee A fee is the price A price is the (usually not negative) quantity of payment or compensation given by one party to another in return for one unit of goods or services ...

toll
motorway from Athens at Corinth. Corinth is the main entry point to the Peloponnesian peninsula, the southernmost area of continental Greece.


Bus

KTELbr>Korinthias
provides intercity bus service in the peninsula and to Athens via the Isthmos station southeast of the city center. Local bus service is also available.


Railways

The metre gauge railway from Athens and Pireaeus reached Corinth in 1884. This station closed to regular public transport in 2007. In 2005, two years prior, the city was connected to the Proastiakos/Suburban, the Athens suburban rail network, following the completion of the new
Corinth railway station Corinth railway station ( el, Σιδηροδρομικός Σταθμός Κορίνθου, Sidirodromikós Stathmós Korínthou) is a train station in Corinth, Greece. The new station is located on the outskirts of the city, near Examilia. The C ...

Corinth railway station
. The journey from Athens to Corinth is estimated to approx. 55 minutes. Train station is 5 minutes by car from the city center and parking is available for free.


Port

The port of Corinth, located north of the city centre and close to the northwest entrance of the
Corinth Canal The Corinth Canal ( el, Διώρυγα της Κορίνθου, translit=Dhioryga tis Korinthou) connects the Gulf of Corinth in the Ionian Sea with the Saronic Gulf The Saronic Gulf (Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or rela ...

Corinth Canal
, at 37 56.0’ N / 22 56.0’ E, serves the local needs of industry and agriculture. It is mainly a cargo exporting facility. It is an artificial harbour (depth approximately , protected by a concrete
mole Mole (or Molé) may refer to: Animals * Mole (animal) or "true mole", mammals in the family Talpidae, found in Eurasia and North America * Golden moles, southern African mammals in the family Chrysochloridae, similar to but unrelated to Talpidae ...
(length approximately 930 metres, width 100 metres, mole surface 93,000 m2). A new pier finished in the late 1980s doubled the capacity of the port. The reinforced mole protects anchored vessels from strong northern winds. Within the port operates a
customs Customs is an authority In the fields of sociology Sociology is the study of society, human social behaviour, patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture that surrounds everyday life. It is a social science that u ...

customs
office facility and a
Hellenic Coast Guard The Hellenic Coast Guard ( Greek Λιμενικό Σώμα-Ελληνική Ακτοφυλακή – ''Limeniko Soma-Elliniki Aktofylaki'' – lit. "Port Corps-Hellenic Coast Guard") is the national coast guard A coast guard or coast ...

Hellenic Coast Guard
post. Sea traffic is limited to trade in the export of local produce, mainly citrus fruits, grapes, marble, aggregates and some domestic imports. The port operates as a contingency facility for general cargo ships,
bulk carrier A bulk carrier, bulker is a specially to transport unpackaged , such as grains, coal, ore, steel coils and cement, in its s. Since the first specialized bulk carrier was built in 1852, economic forces have led to continued development of thes ...
s and
RORO Roll-on/roll-off (RORO or ro-ro) ship A ship is a large watercraft that travels the world's oceans and other sufficiently deep Sea lane, waterways, carrying goods or passengers, or in support of specialized missions, such as defense, r ...

RORO
s, in case of strikes at
Piraeus Piraeus ( ; el, Πειραιάς ; grc, Πειραιεύς ) is a port city The Porticciolo del Cedas port in Trieste.html"_;"title="Barcola_near_Trieste">Barcola_near_Trieste,_a_small_local_port A_port_is_a_ Barcola_near_Tr ...

Piraeus
port.


Ferries

There was formerly a
ferry A ferry is a vessel used to carry passengers, and sometimes vehicles and cargo, across a body of water. A passenger ferry with many stops, such as in Venice Venice ( ; it, Venezia ; vec, Venesia or ) is a city in northeastern It ...

ferry
link to
Catania Catania (, , Sicilian and , grc, Κατάνη) is the second largest city in Sicily, after Palermo, and among the ten largest cities in Italy. Located on Sicily's east coast, it faces the Ionian Sea. It is the capital of the 58-municipality ...

Catania
,
Sicily (man) it, Siciliana (woman) , population_note = , population_blank1_title = , population_blank1 = , demographics_type1 = Ethnicity , demographics1_footnotes = , demographi ...

Sicily
and
Genoa Genoa ( ; it, Genova ; locally ; lij, Zêna ; English, historically, and la, Genua) is the capital of the Regions of Italy, Italian region of Liguria and the List of cities in Italy, sixth-largest city in Italy. In 2015, 594,733 people lived ...

Genoa
in
Italy Italy ( it, Italia ), officially the Italian Republic ( it, Repubblica Italiana, links=no ), is a country consisting of a peninsula delimited by the Alps The Alps ; german: Alpen ; it, Alpi ; rm, Alps; sl, Alpe ) are the highest ...

Italy
.


Canal

The Corinth Canal, carrying ship traffic between the western
Mediterranean Sea The Mediterranean Sea is a connected to the , surrounded by the and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by and and , on the south by , and on the east by the . The Sea has played a central role in the . Although the Mediterrane ...
and the
Aegean Sea The Aegean Sea ; tr, Ege Denizi is an elongated Bay, embayment of the Mediterranean Sea located between Europe's Geography of Europe, Balkan peninsula and Asia's Anatolia peninsula. The sea has an area of some 215,000 square kilometres. In ...

Aegean Sea
, is about east of the city, cutting through the
Isthmus of Corinth An isthmus ( or ; plural: isthmuses or isthmi; from grc, ἰσθμός, isthmós, neck) is a narrow piece of land connecting two larger areas across an expanse of water by which they are otherwise separated. A tombolo A tombolo is a sandy is ...

Isthmus of Corinth
that connects the Peloponnesian peninsula to the Greek mainland, thus effectively making the former an island. The builders dug the canal through the Isthmus at sea level; no locks are employed. It is in length and only wide at its base, making it impassable for most modern ships. It now has little economic importance. The canal was mooted in classical times and an abortive effort was made to build it in the 1st century AD.
Julius Caesar Gaius Julius Caesar (; 12 July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC) was a Roman Roman or Romans most often refers to: *, the capital city of Italy *, Roman civilization from 8th century BC to 5th century AD *, the people of ancient Rome *', shortened ...

Julius Caesar
and
Caligula Caligula (; 31 August 12 – 24 January 41 AD), formally known as Gaius (Gaius Gaius, sometimes spelled ''Gajus'', Cajus, Caius, was a common Latin praenomen The praenomen (; plural: praenomina) was a given name, personal name chosen by th ...

Caligula
both considered digging the canal but died before starting the construction. The emperor
Nero Nero ( ; full name: Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus; 15 December AD 37 – 9 June AD 68) was the fifth emperor of Rome. He was Adoption in Ancient Rome, adopted by the Roman emperor Claudius at the age of 13 and s ...

Nero
was the first to attempt to construct the canal. The Roman workforce responsible for the initial digging consisted of 6,000 Jewish
prisoners of war A prisoner of war (POW) is a non-combatant Non-combatant is a term of art Jargon is the specialized terminology associated with a particular field or area of activity. Jargon is normally employed in a particular Context (language use), co ...
. Modern construction started in 1882, after Greece gained independence from the
Ottoman Empire The Ottoman Empire (; ', ; or '; )info page on bookat Martin Luther University) // CITED: p. 36 (PDF p. 38/338). was an empire that controlled much of Southeastern Europe, Western Asia, and North Africa, Northern Africa between the 14th ...
, but was hampered by geological and financial problems that bankrupted the original builders. It was completed in 1893, but due to the canal's narrowness, navigational problems and periodic closures to repair landslips from its steep walls, it failed to attract the level of traffic anticipated by its operators. It is now used mainly for tourist traffic.


Sport

The city's
association football Association football, more commonly known as simply football or soccer, is a team sport A team sport includes any sport Sport pertains to any form of Competition, competitive physical activity or game that aims to use, maintain ...
team is Korinthos F.C. (''Π.Α.E. Κόρινθος''), established in 1999 after the merger of Pankorinthian Football Club (''Παγκορινθιακός'') and Corinth Football Club (''Κόρινθος''). During the 2006–2007 season, the team played in the Greek Fourth Division's Regional Group 7. The team went undefeated that season and it earned the top spot. This granted the team a promotion to the Gamma Ethnikí (Third Division) for the 2007–2008 season. For the 2008–2009 season, Korinthos F.C. competed in the Gamma Ethniki (Third Division) southern grouping.


Twin towns/sister cities

Corinth is twinned with: *
Syracuse Syracuse may refer to: Places Italy *Syracuse, Sicily Syracuse ( ; it, Siracusa , or scn, Seragusa, label=none ; lat, Syrācūsae ; grc-att, wikt:Συράκουσαι, Συράκουσαι, Syrákousai ; grc-dor, wikt:Συράκοσ ...

Syracuse
,
Sicily (man) it, Siciliana (woman) , population_note = , population_blank1_title = , population_blank1 = , demographics_type1 = Ethnicity , demographics1_footnotes = , demographi ...

Sicily


Notable people

* Costas Soukoulis (1951–), Professor of Physics at
Iowa State University Iowa State University of Science and Technology (Iowa State University, Iowa State, or ISU) is a public In public relations Public relations (PR) is the practice of managing and disseminating information from an individual or an organ ...
* George Kollias (1977–), drummer for US technical death metal band
Nile The Nile, , Bohairic , lg, Kiira , Nobiin Nobiin, or Mahas, is a Northern Nubian languages, Nubian language of the Nilo-Saharan languages, Nilo-Saharan language family. "Nobiin" is the genitive case, genitive form of ''Nòòbíí'' ("Nub ...
. * Ioannis Papadiamantopoulos (1766–1826), revolutionary leader during the
Greek War of Independence The Greek War of Independence, also known as the Greek Revolution of 1821 or Greek Revolution ( el, Ελληνική Επανάσταση, ''Elliniki Epanastasi''; referred to by Greeks The Greeks or Hellenes (; el, Έλληνες, ''É ...
. * Georgios Leonardopoulos, army officer *
Irene Papas Irene Papas (or Pappas; el, Ειρήνη Παππά, Eiríni Pappá, ; born according to most sources on 3 September 1926) is a Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), off ...
, Greek actress * Macarius (1731–1805), Metropolitan bishop of Corinth *
Anastasios Bakasetas Anastasios "Tasos" Bakasetas ( gr, Αναστάσιος "Τάσος" Μπακασέτας; born 28 June 1993) is a Greek professional association football, footballer who plays as a Forward (association football), forward for Turkish Süper Lig cl ...

Anastasios Bakasetas
(1993–), Greek footballer * Evangelos Ikonomou (1987–), Greek footballer * Panagiotis Tzanavaras (1964–), Greek footballer and football manager *
Nikolaos Zafeiriou Nikolaos Zafeiriou ( el, Νικόλαος Ζαφειρίου; 1871 in Corinth – 1947 in Athens) was a Greece, Greek artillery officer who rose to the rank of Lieutenant General. Zafeiriou was born in Corinth in 1871. After studies in the Hellenic ...
(1871–1947), Greek artillery officer * Konstantinos Triantafyllopoulos (1993–) Greek footballer *
Panagis Tsaldaris Panagis Tsaldaris (also Panagiotis Tsaldaris or Panayotis Tsaldaris; el, Παναγιώτης (Παναγής) Τσαλδάρης; 5 March 1868http://istorikesphotografies.blogspot.com/2011/09/1868-1936.html – 17 May 1936) was a Greek politicia ...

Panagis Tsaldaris
(1868–1936), Greek politician and prime minister of Greece


Other locations named after Corinth

Due to its ancient history and the presence of St. Paul the Apostle in Corinth some locations all over the world have been named Corinth.


Gallery

File:Corinth 3.JPG, The central pedestrian road in Corinth File:Corinth 22.JPG, The city's courthouse File:Damaskinoscorinth.jpg, A statue of Damaskinos File:Pegasus Square in New Corinth.jpg, Pegasus Square in New Corinth File:Pegasus - the symbol of New Corinth.jpg, Statue of
Pegasus Pegasus ( gr, Πήγασος, ''Pḗgasos''; la, Pegasus, Pegasos) is a mythical Myth is a folklore genre Folklore is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to t ...

Pegasus
, emblem of the city File:Squarecorinth.jpg, View of the Central Square of the city File:Istmo de Corinto ESC large ISS011 ISS011-E-13188.JPG, Aerial photograph of the
Isthmus of Corinth An isthmus ( or ; plural: isthmuses or isthmi; from grc, ἰσθμός, isthmós, neck) is a narrow piece of land connecting two larger areas across an expanse of water by which they are otherwise separated. A tombolo A tombolo is a sandy is ...

Isthmus of Corinth


See also

*
Corinth Canal The Corinth Canal ( el, Διώρυγα της Κορίνθου, translit=Dhioryga tis Korinthou) connects the Gulf of Corinth in the Ionian Sea with the Saronic Gulf The Saronic Gulf (Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or rela ...

Corinth Canal
*
Corinth Excavations The Corinth Excavations by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens began in 1896 and have continued with little interruption until today. Restricted by the modern village of Ancient Corinth, which directly overlies the ancient city, th ...
*
List of traditional Greek place names This is a list of Greek toponym, place names as they exist in the Greek language. *Places involved in the history of Greek culture, including: **Historic Greek regions, including: ***Ancient Greece, including colonies in antiquity, colonies and c ...


References


External links


City of Corinth official website

Kórinthos FC official website
{{Authority control Mediterranean port cities and towns in Greece Populated places in Corinthia Ports and harbours of Greece Populated coastal places in Greece 1858 establishments in Europe New Testament cities