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List Of British Army Full Generals
This is a list of full generals in the British Army since the Acts of Union 1707. The rank of General (United Kingdom), general (or ''full general'' to distinguish it from the lower general officer ranks) is the highest rank currently achievable by serving officers in the British Army. It ranks above Lieutenant-general (United Kingdom), lieutenant-general and below Field marshal (United Kingdom), field marshal which is now only awarded as an honorary rank. The annotation "Held rank in the East Indies." indicates that the officer served in India in the East India Company's army. __NOTOC__ :''This list is Wikipedia:WikiProject Lists#Incomplete lists, incomplete after 1876; you can help by expanding it.'' See also *List of British generals and brigadiers (covers all ranks from brigadier (and brigadier-general) to field marshal) *List of Royal Marines full generals (the equivalent ranked officers in the Royal Marines) *List of field marshals of the British Army *List of Royal Air F ...
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British Army
The British Army is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed. The Guardian' and Telegraph' use Britain as a synonym for the United Kingdom. Some prefer to use Britain as shorth ..., a part of the British Armed Forces The British Armed Forces, also known as Her Majesty's Armed Forces, are the military services responsible for the defence of the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom .... , the British Army comprises 80,040 regular full-time personnel and 30,020 reserve personnel. The modern British Army traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army

General Of The Cavalry
General of the Cavalry (german: General der Kavallerie) was a General officer rank in the cavalry in various states of which the modern states of German and Austria are Successor state, successors or in other armies which used the German model. Artillery officers of equivalent rank were called "General of the Artillery" (''General der Artillerie''), and infantry officers of equivalent rank "General of the Infantry" (''General der Infanterie''). For more details see: *General of the Cavalry (Austria) for the Imperial Army (Holy Roman Empire), Imperial Army of the Holy Roman Empire, Imperial and Royal Army during the Napoleonic Wars, Imperial Army of the Austrian Empire, and Austro-Hungarian Army, Imperial Army of the Austro-Hungarian Empire *General of the Cavalry (Finland) for the Finnish Defence Forces of the Republic of Finland. *General of the Cavalry (Germany) for the German Army (German Empire), German Imperial Army, the interwar ''Reichswehr'', and the ''Wehrmacht'' *General of ...
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James Cholmondeley
James Cholmondeley (18 April 1708 – 13 October 1775) was a British Army officer and Member of parliament#United Kingdom, Member of Parliament between 1731 and 1747. He fought at Battle of Fontenoy, Fontenoy and during the Jacobite rising of 1745, 1745 Rising commanded a brigade at the Battle of Falkirk Muir, Battle of Falkirk, where he suffered severe exposure. He retired from politics in 1747 and ceased his active military service in 1750, although promoted General (United Kingdom), General in 1770. His marriage ended in divorce in 1737 and he had no children; he died in 1775 and was buried in Westminster Abbey. Life James Cholmondeley was born in April 1708, third son of George Cholmondeley, 2nd Earl of Cholmondeley, George, 2nd Earl of Cholmondeley (1666-1733) and Anna Elizabeth van Ruytenburgh (ca 1672–1722). His eldest brother, also named James, died young and George Cholmondeley, 3rd Earl of Cholmondeley, George, Viscount Malpas (1703-1770) became heir; he had three ...
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John Mordaunt (British Army Officer)
General Sir John Mordaunt (1697 – 23 October 1780) was a British soldier and British Whig Party, Whig politician, the son of Lieutenant-General Harry Mordaunt and Margaret Spencer. He was best known for his command of the Raid on Rochefort which ended in failure and his subsequent court-martial. Cleared on a technicality, he was nonetheless barred from holding further military command. Early career Mordaunt entered the army in 1721 and was promoted Captain (British Army and Royal Marines), captain in 3rd Dragoon Guards, George Wade's Regiment of Dragoon Guards in 1726. He became a lieutenant-colonel in the 3rd Foot Guards in 1731. He entered Parliament for Pontefract (UK Parliament constituency), Pontefract in 1730, for which he sat until 1734, and was then member for Whitchurch (UK Parliament constituency), Whitchurch 1735–1741 and Cockermouth (UK Parliament constituency), Cockermouth 1741–1768. In Parliament he was a steadfast Whig and supporter of Robert Walpole. ...
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James St Clair
General The Hon. James St Clair (1688 – 30 November 1762), was a Scotland, Scottish soldier and Whig (British political faction), Whig politician. Background St Clair was the second son of Henry St Clair, 10th Lord Sinclair and his wife Grizel Cockburn, daughter of Sir James Cockburn, 1st Baronet. As a child he received a commission into the Royal Regiment of Foot, 1st Battalion, Royal Regiment of Foot. Military career St Clair became an ensign of 6th Regiment of Foot in 1694, however was set on halfpay in 1713. In the next year, he was admitted to the 3rd Foot Guards and was promoted to captain in 1714. He served as 2nd major of his regiment from 1722 and as 1st major from 1725, having been advanced to the rank of brevet colonel two years before. In 1734, St Clair was appointed to the command of the Cheshire Regiment, 22nd Regiment of Foot and three years later he was transferred to the colonelship of the Royal Regiment of Foot (later renamed as 1st (Royal) Regiment of Foot), w ...
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William Stanhope, 1st Earl Of Harrington
William Stanhope, 1st Earl of Harrington, His Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, PC (c. 16838 December 1756) was a Kingdom of Great Britain, British Politician, statesman and diplomat. Life William Stanhope was born in 1683 at the family home in Elvaston, Derbyshire, third surviving son of John Stanhope and Dorothy Agard. His elder brother Charles Stanhope (1673–1760), Charles Stanhope (1673–1760) was also a politician and deeply involved in the South Sea Company financial scandal, while his cousin James Stanhope, 1st Earl Stanhope, James Stanhope (1673–1721) is considered an alternative candidate to Robert Walpole for the title of Britain's first Prime Minister. He married Anne Griffiths, who died in 1719 giving birth to twin sons, William Stanhope, 2nd Earl of Harrington, William, 2nd Earl of Harrington (1719–1779) and Thomas (1719–1743). Career Educated at Eton College, Stanhope was commissioned in 1703 as a lieutenant in the 2nd Foot Guards during the ...
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Sir Robert Rich, 4th Baronet
Field Marshal Field marshal (or field-marshal, abbreviated as FM) is the most senior military rank, ordinarily senior to the general officer A general officer is an officer of high rank in the armies, and in some nations' air forces, space force ... Sir Robert Rich, 4th Baronet (3 July 1685 – 1 February 1768) was a British British may refer to: Peoples, culture, and language * British people The British people, or Britons, are the citizens of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ir ... cavalry Historically, cavalry (from the French word ''cavalerie'', itself derived from "cheval" meaning "horse") are soldier A soldier is a person who is a member of a professional army An army (from Latin ''arma'' "arms, weapons" via O ... officer. As a junior officer he fought at the Battle of Schellenberg The Battle of Schellenberg, also known as the Battle of Donauw ...
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Old Style
Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) indicate a dating system from before and after a calendar change, respectively. Usually this is the change from the Julian calendar The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar Gaius Julius Caesar (; 12 July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC) was a Roman Roman or Romans usually refers to: *Rome, the capital city of Italy *Ancient Rome, Roman civilization from 8th century B ... to the Gregorian calendar The Gregorian calendar is the calendar A calendar is a system of organizing days. This is done by giving names to periods of time, typically days, weeks, months and years. A calendar date, date is the designation of a single, speci ... as enacted in various European countries between 1582 and the 20th century. In England England is a Countries of the United Kingdom, country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest ...
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John Ligonier, 1st Earl Ligonier
Field marshal (United Kingdom), Field Marshal John Ligonier, 1st Earl Ligonier, (7 November 168028 April 1770), was a French Huguenot exile, born Jean Louis de Ligonier in Castres, Castres, Southern France. He had a long and distinguished career in the British army and was appointed Commander-in-chief of the British Armed Forces, Commander-in-chief in 1758. During the Seven Years' War, he also served as Master-General of the Ordnance#Masters-General of the Ordnance, 1544–1855, Master-General of the Ordnance, effectively acting as Minister of War for the Pitt–Newcastle ministry. He retired from active duty in 1763 and died at his home in London on 28 April 1770. Military career The son of Louis de Ligonier, a member of a Huguenot family of Castres in the south of France that had emigrated to England in 1697,Pilkington p. 546 and Louise Ligonier (née du Poncet), John Ligonier was educated in France and Switzerland. He joined a regiment in Flanders commanded by John Cutts, 1s ...
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Lord Mark Kerr (governor)
Lord Mark Kerr (baptised 1 April 1676 – 2 February 1752) was a Scottish-born professional soldier, who served in the War of the Spanish Succession and the War of the Quadruple Alliance. He reached the rank of General officer, General in the British Army, and held a number of important administration posts, including Governor of Edinburgh Castle. Life Lord Mark Kerr was born in 1676, fourth son of Robert Kerr, 1st Marquess of Lothian, Robert Kerr, 1st Marquis of Lothian (1636-1703) and his wife, Jean Campbell (d. 1700), daughter of Archibald Campbell, 1st Marquess of Argyll. Through their relationship with Argyll, the family was closely associated with Presbyterian and Whigs (British political party), Whig interests and supported the 1688 Glorious Revolution in Scotland, Glorious Revolution. He never married and died in London on 2 February 1752. He was buried in St Mary Abbots, St Mary Abbots, Kensington, the memorial being lost when the church was rebuilt in 1878. Career In ...
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Philip Honywood (died 1752)
General Sir Philip Honywood Knight Companion of the Bath, KB (also spelled Honeywood; c.1677 – 17 June 1752) was a British Army officer. Biography He was born the second son of Charles Ludovic Honywood of Charing, Kent and Mary Clement. Sir Robert Honeywood was his grandfather: Sir Robert married Frances Vane, daughter of Sir Henry Vane the Elder.Noble, Mark ''Memoirs of the Protectorate-house of Cromwell'' Birmingham 1784 Vol.2 p.487 His father died when Philip was about ten. He entered the Army as an ensign in James Stanley, 10th Earl of Derby, James Stanley's 16th Regiment of Foot, regiment of foot on 12 June 1694,Charles Dalton (1898)''English Army Lists and Commission Registers 1661–1714'', volume IV p. 29-30 and served under King William III in the Netherlands. He was promoted to captain in the Royal Fusiliers on 1 April 1696, and captain in George Hastings, 8th Earl of Huntingdon, the Earl of Huntingdon's newly raised regiment on 10 March 1702. In the reign of Qu ...
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General Of The Infantry
General of the Infantry is a military rank of a General officer A general officer is an Officer (armed forces), officer of highest military ranks, high rank in the army, armies, and in some nations' air forces, space forces, or marines. In some usages the term "general officer" refers to a rank above colo ... in the infantry Infantry is an army specialization whose military personnel, personnel engage in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and armored warfare, armored forces. Also known as foot soldiers, infantrymen or infanteer, i ... and refers to: * General of the Infantry (Austria) * General of the Infantry (Bulgaria) * General of the Infantry (Germany) General of the Infantry (german: General der Infanterie; short: General d. Inf.) is a former rank of the German Ground forces (de: Heer). Presently it is an appointment or position given to an OF-8 rank officer, who is responsible for particul ... ('), a rank of a general in th ...
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