HOME



Daryl Lindsay
Sir Ernest Daryl Lindsay (31 December 1889, in Creswick, Victoria (Australia), Victoria – 25 December 1976, in Mornington, Victoria, Mornington) was an Australian artist and member of the creative Lindsay family. Early life He was the youngest son in a large family born to Anglo-Irish surgeon Robert Charles Alexander and Jane Elizabeth Lindsay (née Williams), of Creswick, Victoria, who had ten children. Daryl and his brothers Percy (the eldest), Lionel Lindsay, Lionel, and Norman Lindsay, Norman, achieved distinction in the arts. Ruby, also an artist, became well known in artistic circles as the wife of the cartoonist/illustrator/journalist Will Dyson. Prior to World War I, Daryl became a Jackaroo (trainee), jackaroo near Collarenebri and later served in the war in France. In England he became a medical artist for the First Australian Imperial Force, Australian Imperial Force. He made many contacts in the art world and studied at the Slade School of Art in London. Daryl had m ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Creswick
Creswick is a town in west-central Victoria, Australia, Victoria, Australia, 18 kilometres north of Ballarat, Victoria, Ballarat and 122 kilometres northwest of Melbourne, in the Shire of Hepburn. It is 430 metres above sea level. At the Census in Australia#2016, 2016 census, Creswick had a 2016_Australian_census, population of 3,170. Creswick was named after the Creswick family, the pioneer settlers of the region. History The area was inhabited by the Dja Dja Wurrung people before white settlement. The pioneer white settlers were Henry, Charles and John Creswick, three brothers who started a large sheep station in 1842. Creswick is a former gold-mining town, established during the Victorian gold rushes in the 1850s. The Post Office opened on 1 September 1854 but was named Creswick's Creek until around 1857. The population reached a peak of 25,000 during the gold rush. Today, local industries include forestry, grazing and agriculture. Creswick was the site of the ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Commonwealth Art Advisory Board
The National Gallery of Australia (originally the Australian National Gallery) is the national art museum of Australia as well as one of the list of largest art museums, largest art museums in Australia, holding more than 166,000 works of art. Located in Canberra in the Australian Capital Territory, it was established in 1967 by the Government of Australia, Australian government as a national public art museum. Establishment Prominent Australian artist Tom Roberts had lobbied various Australian prime ministers, starting with the first, Edmund Barton. Prime Minister Andrew Fisher accepted the idea in 1910, and the following year Parliament established a bipartisan committee of six political leaders—the ''Historic Memorials Committee''. The Committee decided that the government should collect portraits of Australian Governor-General of Australia, governors-general, parliamentary leaders and the principal "fathers" of Federation of Australia, federation to be painted by Austra ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Australian Knights Bachelor
Australians, colloquially referred to as "Aussies", are the citizens, nationality, nationals and individuals associated with the country of Australia. Between 1788 and the Second World War, the vast majority of settlers and immigrants came from the Anglo-Celtic Australians, British Isles (principally English Australians, England, Irish Australians, Ireland and Scottish Australians, Scotland), although there was significant immigration from Chinese Australians, China and German Australians, Germany during the 19th century. Many early British settlements were List of Australian penal colonies, penal colonies to house Convicts in Australia, transported convicts. immigration to Australia, Immigration of "free settlers" increased exponentially from the 1850s, following Australian gold rushes, a series of gold rushes. In the decades immediately following the Second World War, Australia received a Post-war immigration to Australia, large wave of immigration from across European Aus ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

1976 Deaths
Events January * January January is the first month of the year in the Julian calendar, Julian and Gregorian calendars and the first of seven months to have a length of 31 days. The first day of the month is known as New Year's Day. It is, on average, the coldest mon ... – The Cray-1 The Cray-1 was a supercomputer A supercomputer is a computer with a high level of performance as compared to a general-purpose computer. The performance of a supercomputer is commonly measured in floating-point operations per second (FLOPS) ..., the first commercially developed supercomputer upright=1.5, Computing power of the top 1 supercomputer each year, measured in FLOPS A supercomputer is a computer with a high level of performance as compared to a general-purpose computer. The performance of a supercomputer is commonly mea ..., is released by Seymour Cray Seymour Roger Cray (September 28, 1925 – October 5, 1996
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

1890 Births
Year 189 ( CLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday A common year starting on Wednesday is any non-leap year A leap year (also known as an intercalary year or wikt:bissextile, bissextile year) is a calendar year that contains an additional day (or, in the case of a lunisolar calendar, a month) add ... (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar Gaius Julius Caesar (; 12 July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC) was a Roman Roman or Romans usually refers to: *Rome, the capital city of Italy *Ancient Rome, Roman civilization from 8th century B .... At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Silanus and Silanus (or, less frequently, year 942 ''Ab urbe condita 300px, Antoninianus of Pacatianus, Roman usurper, usurper of Roman emperor Philip the Arab, Philip in 248. It reads ''ROMAE AETERAEANOMIL ESIMOET PRIMO'', 'To eternal Rome, in its one thousand and first year.' ''Ab urbe condita'' ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

National Library Of Australia
The National Library of Australia (NLA), formerly the Commonwealth National Library and Commonwealth Parliament Library, is the largest reference library A library is a collection of materials, books or media that are easily accessible for use and not just for display purposes. It is responsible for housing updated information in order to meet the user's needs on a daily basis. A library provid ... in Australia, responsible under the terms of the ''National Library Act 1960'' for "maintaining and developing a national collection of library material, including a comprehensive collection of library material relating to Australia Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a Sovereign state, sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australia (continent), Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous List of islands of Australia, sma ... and the Australian people Australians, colloquially referred to as "Aussies", are the citize ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Bacchus Marsh, Victoria
Bacchus Marsh (Wathawurrung language, Wathawurrung: ''Pullerbopulloke'') is an urban centre and suburban locality in Victoria (Australia), Victoria, Australia located approximately north west of the state capital Melbourne and west of Melton, Victoria, Melton at a near equidistance to the major cities of Melbourne, Ballarat and Geelong. The population of the Bacchus Marsh urban area was 22,223 at June 2018. Bacchus Marsh is the largest urban area in the Local government in Australia, local government area of Shire of Moorabool. Traditionally a Market gardening, market garden area producing a large amount of the region's fruits and vegetables, in recent decades it has transformed into the main commuter town on the Melbourne-Ballarat, Victoria, Ballarat corridor. It was named after one of its original inhabitants, Captain William Henry Bacchus, who saw the great value of this locality as it was situated on two rivers — the Lerderderg River, Lerderderg and Werribee River, Werri ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Great Depression
The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression An economic depression is a sustained, long-term downturn in economic activity in one or more economies. It is a more severe economic downturn than a economic recession, recession, which is a slowdown in economic activity over the course of a norma ... that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied around the world; in most countries, it started in 1929 and lasted until the late 1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. The Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how intensely the global economy can decline. The Great Depression started in the United States after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash A stock market crash is a sudden dramatic decline of stock In finance, stock (also capital stock) co ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Mornington Peninsula
The Mornington Peninsula is a peninsula located south of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia), Victoria, Australia. It is surrounded by Port Phillip to the west, Western Port to the east and Bass Strait to the south, and is connected to the mainland in the north. Geographically, the peninsula begins its protrusion from the mainland in the area between Pearcedale, Victoria, Pearcedale and an area north of Frankston, Victoria, Frankston. The area was originally home to the ''Mayone-bulluk'' and ''Boonwurrung-Balluk'' clans and formed part of the Bunurong, Boonwurrung nation's territory prior to European settlement. Much of the peninsula has been cleared for agriculture and settlements. However, small areas of the native ecology remain in the peninsula's south and west, some of which is protected by the Mornington Peninsula National Park. In 2002, around 180,000 people lived on the peninsula and in nearby areas, most in the built-up towns on its western shorelines which are sometimes r ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Langwarrin South
Langwarrin South is an official bounded locality in Melbourne, Victoria (Australia), Victoria, Australia, 47 km south-east from Melbourne's Melbourne central business district, central business district. Its Local government areas of Victoria, local government area is the City of Frankston. At the Census in Australia#2006, 2006 Census, Langwarrin South had a population of 1003. Langwarrin South is bounded in the north by Robinsons Road, in the east by Dandenong-Hastings Road, in the south by Golf Links and Baxter-Tooradin Roads and in the west by the route of the proposed extension of the Mornington Peninsula Freeway. Mulberry Hill Langwarrin South is the location of Mulberry Hill (Langwarrin South, Victoria), Mulberry Hill, the former home of Daryl Lindsay and writer Joan Lindsay, author of Picnic at Hanging Rock (novel), Picnic at Hanging Rock. Joan Lindsay bequeathed the house to the National Trust of Australia. Situated on Golf Links Road, the house is open to the publ ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]