HOME



picture info

Arrow Slit
An arrowslit (often also referred to as an arrow loop, loophole or loop hole, and sometimes a balistraria) is a narrow vertical aperture in a fortification A fortification is a military construction or building designed for the defense of territories in warfare, and is also used to establish rule in a region during peacetime. The term is derived from Latin ''fortis'' ("strong") and ''facere'' ( ... through which an archer Archery is the art, sport, practice, or skill of using a bow to shoot arrows.Paterson ''Encyclopaedia of Archery'' p. 17 The word comes from the Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic ... can launch arrow An arrow is a fin-stabilized projectile launched by a bow and arrow, bow. A typical arrow usually consists of a long, stiff, straight ''shaft'' with a weighty (and usually sharp and pointed) ''arrowhead'' attached to the front end, multiple fi ...s or a crossbowman can launch bolts. ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Arrow Slat Corfe Castle
An arrow is a fin-stabilized projectile launched by a bow and arrow, bow. A typical arrow usually consists of a long, stiff, straight ''shaft'' with a weighty (and usually sharp and pointed) ''arrowhead'' attached to the front end, multiple fin-like stabilizer (aeronautics), stabilizers called ''fletchings'' mounted near the rear, and a slot at the rear end called ''nock (arrow), nock'' for engaging the bowstring. A container or bag carrying additional arrows for convenient reloading is called a ''quiver''. The use of bows and arrows by humans predates recorded history and is common to most cultures. A craftsman who makes arrows is a ''fletcher (occupation), fletcher'', and one that makes arrowheads is an ''arrowsmith''.Paterson ''Encyclopaedia of Archery'' p. 56 History The oldest evidence of likely arrowheads, dating to c. 64,000 years ago, were found in Sibudu Cave, current South Africa. Backwell L, d'Errico F, Wadley L.(2008). Middle Stone Age bone tools from the Howie ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Siege Of Syracuse (214–212 BCE)
Siege of Syracuse may refer to: Sieges By the Athenians: * Siege of Syracuse (415–413 BC), during the Sicilian Expedition By, or in league with, the Carthaginians: * Siege of Syracuse (397 BC) * Siege of Syracuse (343 BC) * Siege of Syracuse (311–309 BC) * Siege of Syracuse (278 BC) By the Roman Republic: * Siege of Syracuse (213–212 BC), during the Second Punic War against Carthage By the Arab Aghlabid dynasty: * Siege of Syracuse (827–828) * Siege of Syracuse (868) * Siege of Syracuse (877–878) Other * Siege of Syracuse (film), ''Siege of Syracuse'' (film), a 1960 historical drama film See also

* List of sieges of Syracuse {{disambiguation ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

English Longbow
The English longbow was a powerful medieval In the history of Europe The history of Europe concerns itself with the discovery and collection, the study, organization and presentation and the interpretation of past events and affairs of the people of Europe since the beginning of ... type of longbow (a tall bow for archery) about long used by the English and Welsh for hunting and as a weapon in warfare. English use of longbows was effective against the French during the Hundred Years' War The Hundred Years’ War (french: link=yes, La guerre de Cent Ans; 1337–1453) was a series of armed conflicts between the kingdoms of and during the . It originated from disputed claims to the between the English and the French roy ..., particularly at the start of the war in the battles of Sluys Sluis (; zea, label=Zeelandic Zeelandic ( zea, Zeêuws; nl, Zeeuws; vls, Zêeuws) is a group of Friso-Franconian language varieties spoken in the southwestern part ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Firearm
A firearm is any type of gun A gun is a designed to use a shooting tube () to launch typically solid s, but can also project pressurized (e.g. s/s, s for or , , and technically also s), (e.g. ) or even s (e.g. ). Solid projectiles may be free-flying (as with and s ... designed to be readily carried and used by an individual. The term is legally defined further in different countries (see Legal definitions Law is a system of rules created and law enforcement, enforced through social or governmental institutions to regulate behavior,Robertson, ''Crimes against humanity'', 90. with its precise definition a matter of longstanding debate. It has bee ...). The first firearms originated in 10th-century China China (), officially the People's Republic of China (PRC; ), is a country in . It is the world's , with a of more than 1.4 billion. China spans five geographical and 14 different countries, the in the world after . Covering an area of ap ..., when ba ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Loophole (firearm)
A loophole is a protected small opening, which allows a firearm to be aimed and discharged, while providing cover and concealment for the rifleman. To prevent detection, the rifle's muzzle should not protrude through the loophole, particularly at night to hide the muzzle flash. Arrowslit The precursor to the loophole for firearms was the arrowslit, which is a narrow aperture in a fortification for an archer to launch arrows or an Arbalist (crossbowman), arbalist to launch crossbow bolts. The earliest use of the arrowslit was alleged to have been by Archimedes during the Siege of Syracuse (214–212 BCE), siege of Syracuse in 214–212 BC. Arrowslits were used in ancient Greek warfare and by the military of ancient Rome. There was a reintroduction of arrowslits during the medieval warfare period at Dover Castle and Framlingham Castle in England and by Richard I of England, Richard the Lionheart at Château Gaillard in France. First World War During the First World War, ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Gunpowder
Gunpowder, also commonly known as black powder to distinguish it from modern smokeless powder, is the earliest known chemical explosive. It consists of a mixture of sulfur, carbon (in the form of charcoal) and potassium nitrate (saltpeter). The sulfur and carbon act as fuels while the saltpeter is an oxidizer. Gunpowder has been widely used as a propellant in firearms, artillery, rocketry, and pyrotechnics, including use as a blasting agent for explosives in quarrying, mining, and road#Construction, road building. Gunpowder is classified as a explosive material, low explosive because of its relatively slow decomposition rate and consequently low brisance. Low explosives deflagration, deflagrate (i.e., burn at subsonic speeds), whereas high explosives detonation, detonate producing a supersonic shockwave. Ignition of gunpowder packed behind a projectile generates enough pressure to force the shot from the muzzle at high speed, but usually not enough force to rupture the gun barre ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Château Gaillard
Château Gaillard () is a Middle Ages, medieval castle ruin overlooking the River Seine above the Communes of France, commune of Les Andelys, in the French Departments of France, department of Eure, in Normandy. It is located some north-west of Paris and from Rouen. Construction began in 1196 under the auspices of Richard I of England, Richard the Lionheart, who was simultaneously King of England and feudal Duke of Normandy. The castle was expensive to build, but the majority of the work was done in an unusually short period of time. It took just two years and, at the same time, the town of Les Andelys, Petit Andely was constructed. Château Gaillard has a complex and advanced design, and uses early principles of concentric fortification; it was also one of the earliest European castles to use machicolations. The castle consists of three enclosures separated by dry moats, with a keep in the inner enclosure. Château Gaillard was captured in 1204 by the king of France, Philip II ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Richard I Of England
Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England This list of kings and queens of the begins with , who initially ruled , one of the which later made up modern England. Alfred styled himself King of the from about 886, and while he was not the first king to claim to rule all of the , his ... from 1189 until his death in 1199. He also ruled as Duke of Normandy In the Middle Ages, the Duke of Normandy was the ruler of the Duchy of Normandy in north-western Kingdom of France, France. The duchy arose out of a grant of land to the Viking leader Rollo by the French king Charles the Simple, Charles III in 911 ..., Aquitaine Aquitaine ( , , ; oc, Aquitània ; eu, Akitania; Poitevin-Saintongeais: ''Aguiéne''), archaic Guyenne or Guienne ( oc, Guiana), is a historical region of southwestern France France (), officially the French Republic (french: link=n ... and Gascony Gascony (; french: Gascogne ; oc, Gasconha ; eu, Gaskoinia) ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Framlingham Castle
Framlingham Castle is a castle in the market town of Framlingham Framlingham is an English market town A market town is a European Human settlement, settlement that obtained by custom or royal charter, in the Middle Ages, the right to host market (place), markets (market right), which distinguished it ... in Suffolk Suffolk () is a ceremonial county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first published by William Chambers (publisher), W ... in England. An early motte and bailey A motte-and-bailey castle is a European fortification with a wooden or stone keep situated on a raised area of ground called a motte, accompanied by a walled courtyard, or Bailey (castle), bailey, surrounded by a protective Rampart (fortification) ... or ringwork A ringwork is a form of fortified defense (military), defensive structure, usually Circle, circular or ova ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Dover Castle
Dover Castle is a medieval castle in Dover Dover () is a town and major ferry port in Kent Kent is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary, L. Brookes (ed.), 2005, Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, Edi ..., Kent Kent is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first published by William Chambers (publisher), William and Robert ..., England. It was founded in the 11th century and has been described as the "Key to England" due to its defensive significance throughout history. Some sources say it is the largest castle in England, a title also claimed by Windsor Castle Windsor Castle is a at in the English county of . It is strongly associated with the and succeeding , and embodies almost a millennium of . The original castle was built in the 11th  ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Castle
A castle is a type of fortification, fortified structure built during the Middle Ages predominantly by the nobility or royalty and by Military order (monastic society), military orders. Scholars debate the scope of the word ''castle'', but usually consider it to be the private fortified residence of a lord or noble. This is distinct from a palace, which is not fortified; from a fortress, which was not always a residence for royalty or nobility; and from a fortified settlement, which was a public defence – though there are many similarities among these types of construction. Usage of the term has varied over time and has been applied to structures as diverse as hill forts and country houses. Over the approximately 900 years that castles were built, they took on a great many forms with many different features, although some, such as curtain wall (fortification), curtain walls, arrowslits, and portcullises, were commonplace. European-style castles originated in the 9 ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

City Wall
A defensive wall is a fortification A fortification is a military construction or building designed for the defense of territories in warfare, and is also used to establish rule in a region during peacetime. The term is derived from Latin ''fortis'' ("strong") and ''facere'' ( ... usually used to protect a city, town or other settlement from potential aggressors. The walls can range from simple palisades or earthworks to extensive military fortifications with towers, bastions and gates for access to the city. From ancient to modern times, they were used to enclose settlements. Generally, these are referred to as city walls or town walls, although there were also wall A wall is a structure and a surface that defines an area; carries a load; provides security Security is freedom from, or resilience against, potential Potential generally refers to a currently unrealized ability. The term is used in a wide ...s, such as the Great Wall of China The Great Wall ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]