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Sir William Hamilton, 9th Baronet
Sir William Hamilton, 9th Baronet FRSE (8 March 1788 – 6 May 1856) was a Scottish metaphysician. He is often referred to as William Stirling Hamilton of Preston, in reference to his mother, Elizabeth Stirling. Early life He was born in rooms at the University of Glasgow, He was from an academic family: his father Professor William Hamilton, had in 1781, on the recommendation of William Hunter, been appointed to succeed his own father, Dr Thomas Hamilton, as Regius Professor of Anatomy, Glasgow; he died in 1790, aged 32. William Hamilton and his younger brother, Thomas Hamilton, were brought up by their mother. Hamilton received his early education at Glasgow Grammar School, except for two years which he spent in a private school at Chiswick in Kent, and in 1807 went as a Snell Exhibitioner, to Balliol College, Oxford. He obtained a first class in ''literis humanioribus'' and took his BA in 1811 (MA 1814). He had been intended for the medical profession, but soon aft ...
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William Rowan Hamilton
Sir William Rowan Hamilton Doctor of Law, LL.D, Doctor of Civil Law, DCL, Royal Irish Academy, MRIA, Royal Astronomical Society#Fellow, FRAS (3/4 August 1805 – 2 September 1865) was an Irish mathematician, astronomer, and physicist. He was the Andrews Professor of Astronomy at Trinity College Dublin, and Royal Astronomer of Ireland, living at Dunsink Observatory. Hamilton's scientific career included the study of geometrical optics, ideas from Fourier analysis, and his work on quaternions which made him one of the founders of modern linear algebra. He made major contributions in optics, classical mechanics and abstract algebra. His work was fundamental to modern theoretical physics, particularly his reformulation of Newtonian mechanics, now called Hamiltonian mechanics. It is now central both to electromagnetism and to quantum mechanics. Early life Hamilton was the fourth of nine children born to Sarah Hutton (1780–1817) and Archibald Hamilton (1778–1819),Bruno (2003) who ...
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Bust Of Sir William Hamilton, By William Brodie, Old College, University Of Edinburgh
Bust commonly refers to: * A woman's breasts * Bust (sculpture), of head and shoulders * An arrest Bust may also refer to: Places *Bust, Bas-Rhin, a city in France *Lashkargah, Afghanistan, known as Bust historically Media * ''Bust'' (magazine) of feminist pop culture *''Bust'', a British television series (1987–1988) *"Bust", a 2015 song by rapper Waka Flocka Flame Other uses *Bust, in blackjack *Boom and bust economic cycle * Draft bust in sports, referring to an highly touted athlete that does not meet expectations See also *Busted (other) *Crimebuster (other) Crimebuster or crime busters or ''variation'', may refer to: Comics * ''Crimebuster'' (Boy Comics), alter-ego of Chuck Chandler, fictional boy hero of the 1940s-1950s * ''Crimebuster'' (Marvel Comics) * ''Crimebusters'' (DC Comics), a short-li ... * Gangbuster (other) {{Disambiguation ...
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Advocate
An advocate is a professional in the field of law. Different countries' legal systems use the term with somewhat differing meanings. The broad equivalent in many English law–based jurisdictions could be a barrister or a solicitor. However, in Scottish, Manx, South African, Italian, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Scandinavian, Polish, Israeli, South Asian and South American jurisdictions, "Advocate" indicates a lawyer of superior classification. "Advocate" is in some languages an honorific for lawyers, such as " Adv. Sir Alberico Gentili". "Advocate" also has the everyday meaning of speaking out to help someone else, such as patient advocacy or the support expected from an elected politician; this article does not cover those senses. Europe United Kingdom and Crown dependencies England and Wales In England and Wales, Advocates and proctors practiced civil law in the Admiralty Courts and also, but in England only, in the ecclesiastical courts of the Church of Engla ...
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Balliol College, Oxford
Balliol College () is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. One of Oxford's oldest colleges, it was founded around 1263 by John I de Balliol, a landowner from Barnard Castle in County Durham, who provided the foundation and endowment for the college. When de Balliol died in 1268, his widow, Dervorguilla, a woman whose wealth far exceeded that of her husband, continued his work in setting up the college, providing a further endowment and writing the statutes. She is considered a co-founder of the college. The college's alumni include four former Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom ( H. H. Asquith, Harold Macmillan, Edward Heath, and Boris Johnson), Harald V of Norway, Empress Masako of Japan, five Nobel laureates, several Lords of Appeal in Ordinary, and numerous literary and philosophical figures, including Shoghi Effendi, Adam Smith, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Aldous Huxley. John Wycliffe, who translated the Bible into English, was ma ...
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Snell Exhibitioner
The Snell Exhibition is an annual scholarship awarded to students of the University of Glasgow to allow them to undertake postgraduate study at Balliol College, Oxford. The award was founded by the bequest of Sir John Snell in a will made in 1677, although the original stipulation referred to the University of Oxford, rather than Balliol in particular. Snell died on 6 August 1679, but wrangling over the will meant that it was nearly twenty years before the first scholarships were awarded; the first four Snell Exhibitioners were admitted to Balliol in mid-1699. Snell had been a Royalist in the Civil War, and was later secretary to the Duke of Monmouth and had the management of his Scottish estates. He intended the bequest to be used to educate Scottish clergymen for the then-established Scottish Episcopal Church. By Adam Smith's day, the bequest was mostly regarded as an educational charity, though its exact status was not settled until later. "By the will of John Snell his exhibit ...
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Kent
Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London to the north-west, Surrey to the west and East Sussex to the south-west, and Essex to the north across the estuary of the River Thames; it faces the French department of Pas-de-Calais across the Strait of Dover. The county town is Maidstone. It is the fifth most populous county in England, the most populous non-Metropolitan county and the most populous of the home counties. Kent was one of the first British territories to be settled by Germanic tribes, most notably the Jutes, following the withdrawal of the Romans. Canterbury Cathedral in Kent, the oldest cathedral in England, has been the seat of the Archbishops of Canterbury since the conversion of England to Christianity that began in the 6th century with Saint Augustine. Rochester Cathedral in Medway is England's second-oldest cathedral. Located between London and the Strait of Dover, which separates England from m ...
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High School Of Glasgow
The High School of Glasgow is an independent, co-educational day school in Glasgow, Scotland. The original High School of Glasgow was founded as the choir school of Glasgow Cathedral in around 1124, and is the oldest school in Scotland, and the twelfth oldest in the United Kingdom. On its closure as a selective grammar school by Glasgow City Corporation in 1976, it immediately continued as a co-educational independent school as a result of fundraising activity by its Former Pupil Club and via a merge by the Club with Drewsteignton School. The school maintains a relationship with the Cathedral, where it holds an annual service of commemoration and thanksgiving in September. It counts two British Prime Ministers, two Lords President and the founder of the University of Aberdeen among its alumni. It is a selective school, meaning prospective pupils must sit an entrance test to gain admission. In 2009 and 2017, ''The Times'' placed it as the top independent school in Scotland for ...
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Thomas Hamilton (writer)
Thomas Hamilton (17897 December 1842) was a Scottish soldier and author. Life He was born in Pisa, Tuscany, the second son of William Hamilton (1758–1790), professor of anatomy and botany at Glasgow. He was the younger brother of metaphysician Sir William Hamilton (1788–1856). Their father died a few months after Thomas was born. After preliminary education at Glasgow, he was placed in 1801 as a pupil with the Rev. Dr. Home, in Chiswick, England, and some months later with the Rev. Dr. Scott, Hounslow, also in England. For several months in 1803, he was with Dr. Sommers at Mid Calder, Midlothian, preparatory to entering Glasgow University, where he matriculated the following November. He studied there for three years, proving himself an able if not very diligent student. His close college companion, of whom he saw little in later life, was Michael Scott, the author of ''Tom Cringle's Log''. Hamilton's bias was towards the army, and in 1810, after fully showing his incapa ...
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Regius Professor Of Anatomy, Glasgow
{{Use British English, date=October 2017 The Regius Chair of Anatomy is a Regius professorship at the University of Glasgow in Scotland. Founded in 1718 as the Regius Chair of Anatomy and Botany the province of the chair was restricted to anatomy in 1818 when the Regius Chair of Botany was founded. Regius Professors of Anatomy and Botany/Regius Professors of Anatomy * Thomas Brisbane, MD (1720) * Robert Hamilton, MD (1742) * Joseph Black, MD (1756), Later Professor of the Practice of Medicine * Thomas Hamilton, MD (1757) * William Hamilton, MD (1781) * James Jeffray, MD (1790) * Allen Thomson, MA MD LLD DCL FRS (1848) * John Cleland, MA MD FRS (1877) * Thomas Hastie Bryce, MA MD FRS (1909) * Duncan MacCallum Blair, MB DSc (1935-1944) * William James Hamilton, MD DSc (1946) * George McCreath Wyburn, MB ChB DSc (1948) * Raymond John Scothorne, BSc MD FRSE (1973-1990) References *''Who, What and Where: The History and Constitution of the University of Glasgow''. Compiled by Mi ...
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William Hunter (anatomist)
William Hunter (23 May 1718 – 30 March 1783) was a Scottish anatomist and physician. He was a leading teacher of anatomy, and the outstanding obstetrician of his day. His guidance and training of his equally famous brother, John Hunter, was also of great importance. Early life and career Hunter was born at Long Calderwood, now a part of East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire, to Agnes Paul (c.1685–1751) and John Hunter (1662/3–1741). He was the elder brother of surgeon, John Hunter. After studying divinity at the University of Glasgow, he went into medicine in 1737, studying under William Cullen. Arriving in London, Hunter became resident pupil to William Smellie (1741–44) and he was trained in anatomy at St George's Hospital, London, specialising in obstetrics. He followed the example of Smellie in giving a private course on dissecting, operative procedures and bandaging, from 1746. His courtly manners and sensible judgement helped him to advance until he became the lead ...
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William Hamilton (physician)
William Hamilton FRSE (31 July 1758 – 13 March 1790) was a Scottish physician and botanist. He was one of the founding members of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1783. Life He was born in Glasgow on 31 July 1758, the son of Isabel Anderson, daughter of William Anderson, who taught ecclesiastical history at Glasgow University from 1721 to 1752, and Prof Thomas Hamilton (died 1782), professor of anatomy and botany at the University of Glasgow. He attended Glasgow Grammar School, then the University of Glasgow graduating with an MA in 1775. He then studied medicine, first at the University of Edinburgh and then from 1777 in London under William Hunter (anatomist), Prof William Hunter, acting as Hunter’s demonstrator in his dissecting rooms. In 1780 he returned to Glasgow to take over his ailing father’s anatomy classes. When his father died in 1782, he was granted his professorship in anatomy and botany. He continued in this role until his death, also practising at the Gla ...
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University Of Glasgow
, image = UofG Coat of Arms.png , image_size = 150px , caption = Coat of arms Flag , latin_name = Universitas Glasguensis , motto = la, Via, Veritas, Vita , mottoeng = The Way, The Truth, The Life , established = , type = Public research universityAncient university , endowment = £225.2 million , budget = £809.4 million , rector = Rita Rae, Lady Rae , chancellor = Dame Katherine Grainger , principal = Sir Anton Muscatelli , academic_staff = 4,680 (2020) , administrative_staff = 4,003 , students = () , undergrad = () , postgrad = () , city = Glasgow , country = Scotland, UK , colours = , website = , logo ...
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