HOME



Scottish Folklore
Scottish folklore encompasses the folklore Folklore is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the tradition A tradition is a belief A belief is an attitude Attitude may refer to: Philosophy and psychology * Attitude (psycholog ... of the Scottish people The Scots ( sco, Scots Fowk; gd, Albannaich) are a nation A nation is a community A community is a social unitThe term "level of analysis" is used in the social sciences to point to the location, size, or scale of a research target. ... from their earliest records until today. Folklorists Folklore studies, also known as folkloristics, and occasionally tradition studies or folk life studies in the United Kingdom, is the branch of anthropology devoted to the study of folklore. This term, along with its synonyms,According to Alan Du ..., both academic and amateur, have published a variety of works focused specifically on the area over the years.Sanderso ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Folklore
Folklore is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the tradition A tradition is a belief A belief is an attitude Attitude may refer to: Philosophy and psychology * Attitude (psychology) In psychology Psychology is the science of mind and behavior. Psychology includes the study of conscious ...s common to that culture, subculture or group. This includes oral tradition Oral tradition, or oral lore, is a form of human communication Human communication, or anthroposemiotics, is the field dedicated to understanding how human Humans (''Homo sapiens'') are the most populous and widespread species of prima ...s such as tales, proverbs A proverb (from la, proverbium) is a simple and insightful, traditional saying A saying is any concisely written or spoken expression that is especially memorable because of its meaning or style. Sayings are categorized as follows: * Aphorism ... and jokes A jo ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Scottish People
The Scots ( sco, Scots Fowk; gd, Albannaich) are a nation and ethnic group native to Scotland. Historically, they emerged in the Scotland in the Early Middle Ages, early Middle Ages from an amalgamation of two Celtic languages, Celtic-speaking peoples, the Picts and Gaels, who founded the Kingdom of Scotland (or ''Kingdom of Alba, Alba'') in the 9th century. In the following two centuries, the Celtic-speaking Hen Ogledd, Cumbrians of Kingdom of Strathclyde, Strathclyde and the Germanic-speaking Anglo-Saxons, Angles of north Northumbria became part of Scotland. In the Scotland in the High Middle Ages, High Middle Ages, during the 12th-century Davidian Revolution, small numbers of Normans, Norman nobles migrated to the Lowlands. In the 13th century, the Norse-Gaels of the Kingdom of the Isles, Western Isles became part of Scotland, followed by the Norse of the Northern Isles in the 15th century. In modern usage, "Scottish people" or "Scots" refers to anyone whose linguistic, c ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Folkloristics
Folklore studies, also known as folkloristics, and occasionally tradition studies or folk life studies in the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed. The Guardian' and Telegraph' use Britain as a synonym for the United Kingdom. Some prefer to use Britain as shorth ..., is the branch of anthropology Anthropology is the scientific study of human Humans (''Homo sapiens'') are the most abundant and widespread species In biology Biology is the natural science that studies life and living organisms, including their anatomy, ... devoted to the study of folklore Folklore is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the tradition A tradition is a belief A belief is an attitude Attitude may refer to: Philosophy and psychology * Attitude (psycholog .... This term, along with its synonyms, gained ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Loch Ness Monster
The Loch Ness Monster, or Nessie ( gd, Uilebheist Loch Nis), is a creature in Scottish folkloreScottish folklore encompasses the folklore Folklore is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to that culture, subculture or group. These include oral traditions such as Narrat ... that is said to inhabit Loch Ness Loch Ness (; gd, Loch Nis ) is a large, deep, freshwater loch in the Scottish Highlands extending for approximately southwest of Inverness. Its surface is above sea level. Loch Ness is best known for alleged sightings of the cryptozoology ... in the Scottish Highlands The Highlands ( sco, the Hielands; gd, a’ Ghàidhealtachd , 'the place of the Gaels The Gaels ( ; ga, Na Gaeil ; gd, Na Gàidheil ; gv, Ny Gaeil ) are an ethnolinguistic group An ethnolinguistic group (or ethno-linguistic group) .... It is often described as large, long-necked, and with one or more humps p ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Brownie (folklore)
A brownie or broonie ( Scots), also known as a or (Scottish Gaelic Scottish Gaelic ( gd, Gàidhlig ), also known as Scots Gaelic and Gaelic, is a Goidelic language The Goidelic or Gaelic languages ( ga, teangacha Gaelacha; gd, cànanan Goidhealach; gv, çhengaghyn Gaelgagh) form one of the two groups o ...), is a household spirit A household deity is a deity A deity or god is a supernatural The supernatural encompasses supposed phenomena that are not subject to the laws of nature.https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/supernatural By definition, a supernatu ... from Scottish folkloreScottish folklore encompasses the folklore Folklore is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to that culture, subculture or group. These include oral traditions such as Narrat ... that is said to come out at night while the owners of the house are asleep and perform various chores and farming t ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Bogle
A bogle, boggle, or bogill is a Northumbrian language, Northumbrian''Rambles in Northumberland, and on the Scottish border ...'' by William Andrew Chatto, Chapman and Hall, 1835 and Scots language, Scots term for a ghost or folkloric being,''The local historian's table book, of remarkable occurrences, historical facts, traditions, legendary and descriptive ballads [&c.] connected with the counties of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland and Durham.'' by Moses Aaron Richardson, M. A. Richardson, 1843 used for a variety of related folkloric creatures including Shellycoats,''Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border'' by Walter Scott, Sr. Barghests, Brag (folklore), Brags, the Hedley Kow and even giants such as those associated with Devil's Causeway, Cobb's Causey (also known as "ettins", "yetuns" or "yotuns" in Northumberland and "Etenes", "Yttins" or "Ytenes" in the South and South West).''Northumberland Words – A Glossary of Words Used in the County of Northumberland and on the Tynes ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Kelpie
A kelpie, or water kelpie, is a shape-shifting spirit inhabiting lochs in Scottish folkloreScottish folklore encompasses the folklore Folklore is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to that culture, subculture or group. These include oral traditions such as Narrat .... It is a Celtic legend; however, analogues exist in other cultures. It is usually described as a black horse-like creature, able to adopt human form. Some accounts state that the kelpie retains its hooves when appearing as a human, leading to its association with the Christian idea of Satan Satan, (''śāṭān''), meaning "adversary"; grc, ὁ σατανᾶς or σατάν (''ho satanas'' or ''satan''); ar, شيطان (''shaitan''), meaning "astray", "distant", or sometimes "devil" also known as the Devil, is an entity in th ... as alluded to by Robert Burns The name Robert is an ancient Germanic given name, from Proto-Ger ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Selkie
In Celtic The words Celt and Celtic (also Keltic) may refer to: Ethno-linguistics *Celts The Celts (, see pronunciation of ''Celt'' for different usages) are. "CELTS location: Greater Europe time period: Second millennium B.C.E. to present ancestry: ... and Norse Norse is demonym for Norsemen, a medieval North Germanic ethnolinguistic group ancestral to modern Scandinavians, defined as speakers of Old Norse from about the 9th to the 13th centuries. Norse may also refer to: Culture and religion * Norse m ... mythology, selkies (also spelled ', ', ') or selkie folk ( sco, selkie fowk) meaning 'seal folk' are mythological beings capable of therianthropy Therianthropy is the mythology, mythological ability of human beings to metamorphosis, metamorphose into other animals by means of shapeshifting. It is possible that cave drawings found at Trois Frères, Les Trois Frères, in France, depict ancien ..., changing from seal Seal may refer to any of the following: ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Wulver
The wulver or wullver is a kind of Gray wolf, wolf-like humanoid creature in the folklore of the Shetland Islands of Scotland. In modern times, the origin of the wulver has been disputed. History The wulver is said by the Shetland folklorist Jessie Saxby to be benevolent, although later accounts state that they became violent if provoked. They were generally friendly to locals, however, and were known to share the fish they caught with them. They were usually described as looking like furry people with the head of a wolf. Some accounts claim they were never human to begin with. Saxby, in ''Shetland Traditional Lore'' writes:In previous publications, Saxby spelled the word as "wullver." Interpretations After researching folklore traditions gathered primarily from Scottish Gaelic, Gaelic areas of Scotland, an authority on congenital disorders, Susan Schoon Eberly, has speculated that the tale of the wulver may have its basis in humans suffering a medical condition; possibly Hu ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Bean-nighe
The bean-nighe (Scottish Gaelic for "washerwoman" or "laundress"; ) is a female spirit in Scottish folklore, regarded as an omen of death and a messenger from the Otherworld. She is a type of ''ban-sìth'' (in Irish language, Irish, ''bean sídhe'', anglicized as "banshee") that haunts desolate streams and washes the clothing of those about to die. ''Les Lavandières'' is the French word under which these "night washerwomen" are perhaps best known. She is also called nigheag, “the little washer,” nigheag na h-ath, “little washer of the ford,” or nigheag bheag a bhroin, “little washer of the sorrow.” Legends The ''bean-nighe'', also known as the Washing Woman or Washer at the Ford, is seen in lonely places beside a stream or pool, washing the blood from the linen and grave-clothes of those who are about to die. Her characteristics vary depending on the locality, and differing traditions ascribe to her the powers of imparting knowledge or the granting of wishes if she is a ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Blue Men Of The Minch
The blue men of the Minch, also known as storm kelpies ( gd, na fir ghorma ), are mythological creatures inhabiting the stretch of water between the northern Outer Hebrides and mainland Scotland, looking for sailors to drown and stricken boats to sink. They appear to be localised to the Minch and surrounding areas, unknown in other parts of Scotland and without counterparts in the rest of the world. Apart from their blue colour, the mythical creatures look much like humans, and are about the same size. They have the power to create storms, but when the weather is fine they float sleeping on or just below the surface of the water. The blue men swim with their torsos raised out of the sea, twisting and diving as porpoises do. They are able to speak, and when a group approaches a ship its chief may shout two lines of poetry to the master of the vessel and challenge him to complete the verse. If the skipper fails in that task then the blue men will attempt to Capsizing, capsize his sh ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Folklore (journal)
The Folklore Society (FLS) is a national association in the United Kingdom for the study of folklore. It was founded in London in 1878 to study traditional vernacular culture, including traditional music, song, dance and drama, narrative, arts and crafts, customs and belief. The foundation was prompted by a suggestion made by Eliza Gutch in the pages of ''Notes and Queries''.Jacqueline Simpson (Editor), Steve Roud (Editor) (2003). ''A Dictionary of English Folklore''. Oxford University Press. The Society is a Charitable organization, registered charity under English law. The Folklore Society office is at Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, The Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, 50 Fitzroy Street, London. Members William Thoms, the editor of ''Notes and Queries'' who had first introduced the term ''folk-lore'', seems to have been instrumental in the formation of the society and, along with George Laurence Gomme, G. L. Gomme, was ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]