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Henry Hotze
Henry Hotze (September 2, 1833 – April 19, 1887) was a Swiss Americans, Swiss American propagandist for the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. He acted as a Confederate agent in Great Britain, attempting to build support for the Southern cause there. Hotze attempted to use liberal arguments of self-determination in favor of national independence, echoing the failed European revolutions of 1848. He also promised that the Confederacy would be a low-tariff nation in contrast to the high-tariff United States, and he emphasized the consequences of cotton shortages for the industrial workers in Britain, as caused by the Union blockade of Southern ports. Early life and career He was the son of Rudolph Hotze, a captain in the French Royal Service, and Sophie Esslinger. He was educated in a Jesuit setting and emigrated to the United States in his youth. He became a naturalized citizen in 1855, and lived in Mobile, Alabama, where he made important connections th ...
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Felix Senac
Felix Senac (July 28, 1815January 27, 1866) was a Confederate States Navy agent to Europe from 1862 to 1865. A native of Pensacola, Florida, Senac married in Mobile, Alabama, and moved his family to Key West just prior to the American Civil War. In 1861 he tendered his resignation as Paymaster of the while the vessel was still in La Spezia, Italy. He would be paymaster of the Confederate navy in Europe until the end of the Civil War. He died in 1866 while in Wiesbaden, Germany. His daughter Ruby married the famous Confederate propagandist Henry Hotze in 1867 in Paris. Senac was related by marriage to Confederate States Navy secretary Stephen Mallory and Marine Corps 2nd lieutenant John L. Rapier. In a letter to the Confederate agent James Dunwoody Bulloch, Mallory describes him thus: "He speaks French with purity and elegance, Spanish also, possesses fine business capacity, and is a gentleman of ripe judgement and rare merit". Early life Felix Senac was born on July 28, 18 ...
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Switzerland
). Swiss law does not designate a ''capital'' as such, but the federal parliament and government are installed in Bern, while other federal institutions, such as the federal courts, are in other cities (Bellinzona, Lausanne, Luzern, Neuchâtel, St. Gallen a.o.). , coordinates = , largest_city = Zürich , official_languages = , englishmotto = "One for all, all for one" , religion_year = 2020 , religion_ref = , religion = , demonym = , german: Schweizer/Schweizerin, french: Suisse/Suissesse, it, svizzero/svizzera or , rm, Svizzer/Svizra , government_type = Federal assembly-independent directorial republic with elements of a direct democracy , leader_title1 = Federal Council , leader_name1 = , leader_title2 = , leader_name2 = Walter Thurnherr , legislature = Federal Assembly , upper_house = Council of ...
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The Index Paper 2
''The'' () is a grammatical article in English, denoting persons or things already mentioned, under discussion, implied or otherwise presumed familiar to listeners, readers, or speakers. It is the definite article in English. ''The'' is the most frequently used word in the English language; studies and analyses of texts have found it to account for seven percent of all printed English-language words. It is derived from gendered articles in Old English which combined in Middle English and now has a single form used with pronouns of any gender. The word can be used with both singular and plural nouns, and with a noun that starts with any letter. This is different from many other languages, which have different forms of the definite article for different genders or numbers. Pronunciation In most dialects, "the" is pronounced as (with the voiced dental fricative followed by a schwa) when followed by a consonant sound, and as (homophone of pronoun ''thee'') when followed by a ...
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John Slidell
John Slidell (1793July 9, 1871) was an American politician, lawyer, and businessman. A native of New York, Slidell moved to Louisiana as a young man and became a Representative and Senator. He was one of two Confederate diplomats captured by the United States Navy from the British ship RMS ''Trent'' in 1861 and later released. He was the older brother of Alexander Slidell Mackenzie, a US naval officer. Early life He was born to merchant John Slidell and Margery née Mackenzie, a Scot. He graduated from Columbia University (then College) 1810. In 1835, Slidell married Mathilde Deslonde. They had three children, Alfred Slidell, Marie Rosine (later n 30 Sept. 1872''comtesse'' ountessde St. Roman), and Marguerite Mathilde (later n 3 Oct. 1864''baronne'' aroness Frederic Emile d'Erlanger). Political career Prior to the Mexican–American War, Slidell was sent to Mexico, by President James Knox Polk, to negotiate an agreement whereby the Rio Grande would be the southern border ...
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James Williams (ambassador)
James Williams (July 1, 1796 – April 10, 1869) was an American Diplomatic rank#Historical ranks.2C 1815-1961, Minister Resident (Ambassador) to the Ottoman Empire, appointed on January 14, 1858 by James Buchanan, President James Buchanan. James Williams remained in this function until the outbreak of the American Civil War, terminating his functions on May 25, 1861. A native of Tennessee, he remained in Europe supporting the Confederacy by selling Confederate bonds, as well as writing numerous articles and books in favor of the South alongside Henry Hotze in London. Accused of treason for joining the Confederate cause as a US Government employee, he remained in Europe and died in Austria in 1869. Early life James Williams was born in Grainger County, Tennessee in 1796. He later moved to Chattanooga, Tennessee, Chattanooga with his brother William Williams where both brothers owned and ran a profitable steamboat business, transporting salt and furs on the Tennessee River ...
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Ireland
Ireland ( ; ga, Éire ; Ulster Scots dialect, Ulster-Scots: ) is an island in the Atlantic Ocean, North Atlantic Ocean, in Northwestern Europe, north-western Europe. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel (Great Britain and Ireland), North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland is the List of islands of the British Isles, second-largest island of the British Isles, the List of European islands by area, third-largest in Europe, and the List of islands by area, twentieth-largest on Earth. Geopolitically, Ireland is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially Names of the Irish state, named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. As of 2022, the Irish population analysis, population of the entire island is just over 7 million, with 5.1 million living in the Republic of Ireland and 1.9 million in Northern Ireland, ranking it the List of European islan ...
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France
France (), officially the French Republic ( ), is a country primarily located in Western Europe. It also comprises of overseas regions and territories in the Americas and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Its metropolitan area extends from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea; overseas territories include French Guiana in South America, Saint Pierre and Miquelon in the North Atlantic, the French West Indies, and many islands in Oceania and the Indian Ocean. Due to its several coastal territories, France has the largest exclusive economic zone in the world. France borders Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Switzerland, Monaco, Italy, Andorra, and Spain in continental Europe, as well as the Netherlands, Suriname, and Brazil in the Americas via its overseas territories in French Guiana and Saint Martin. Its eighteen integral regions (five of which are overseas) span a combined area of and contain clos ...
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The Index (journal)
Index (or its plural form indices) may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Fictional entities * Index (''A Certain Magical Index''), a character in the light novel series ''A Certain Magical Index'' * The Index, an item on a Halo megastructure in the ''Halo'' series of video games Periodicals and news portals * ''Index Magazine'', a publication for art and culture * Index.hr, a Croatian online newspaper * index.hu, a Hungarian-language news and community portal * ''The Index'' (Kalamazoo College), a student newspaper * ''The Index'', an 1860s European propaganda journal created by Henry Hotze to support the Confederate States of America * '' Truman State University Index'', a student newspaper Other arts, entertainment and media * The Index (band) * ''Indexed'', a Web cartoon by Jessica Hagy * ''Index'', album by Ana Mena Business enterprises and events * Index (retailer), a former UK catalogue retailer * INDEX, a market research fair in Lucknow, India * Index Corp ...
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Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston
Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston, (20 October 1784 – 18 October 1865) was a British statesman who was twice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid-19th century. Palmerston dominated British foreign policy during the period 1830 to 1865, when Britain stood at the height of its imperial power. He held office almost continuously from 1807 until his death in 1865. He began his parliamentary career as a Tory, defected to the Whigs in 1830, and became the first prime minister from the newly formed Liberal Party in 1859. He was highly popular with the British public. David Brown argues that "an important part of Palmerston's appeal lay in his dynamism and vigour". Henry Temple succeeded to his father's Irish peerage (which did not entitle him to a seat in the House of Lords, leaving him eligible to sit in the House of Commons) as the 3rd Viscount Palmerston in 1802. He became a Tory MP in 1807. From 1809 to 1828 he served as Secretary at War, organising the fi ...
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Money And Market Review
Money is any item or verifiable record that is generally accepted as payment for goods and services and repayment of debts, such as taxes, in a particular country or socio-economic context. The primary functions which distinguish money are as a medium of exchange, a unit of account, a store of value and sometimes, a standard of deferred payment. Money was historically an emergent market phenomenon that possess intrinsic value as a commodity; nearly all contemporary money systems are based on unbacked fiat money without use value. Its value is consequently derived by social convention, having been declared by a government or regulatory entity to be legal tender; that is, it must be accepted as a form of payment within the boundaries of the country, for "all debts, public and private", in the case of the United States dollar. Contexts which erode public confidence, such as the circulation of counterfeit money or domestic hyperinflation, can cause good money to lose its value. ...
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Morning Herald
The ''Morning Herald'' was an early daily newspaper in the United Kingdom. The newspaper was founded in 1780 by the Reverend Sir Henry Bate Dudley, former editor of ''The Morning Post''. It was initially a liberal paper aligned with the Prince of Wales, but later became aligned with the Tories. In 1843, it was bought by Edward Baldwin, then after his death in 1848 was acquired by James Johnstone, who also owned the ''Evening Standard The ''Evening Standard'', formerly ''The Standard'' (1827–1904), also known as the ''London Evening Standard'', is a local free daily newspaper in London, England, published Monday to Friday in tabloid format. In October 2009, after be ...''. He differentiated the two newspapers by charging 4d a copy for the ''Herald'' and only 2d for the ''Standard''. This was initially successful, and he briefly created the ''Evening Herald'' as a companion to the ''Morning Herald'', but neither edition made a profit, the evening edition soon clo ...
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